JoVE Visualize What is visualize?
Stop Reading. Start Watching.
Advanced Search
Stop Reading. Start Watching.
Regular Search
Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Optical properties of graphene nanoribbons encapsulated in single-walled carbon nanotubes.
ACS Nano
PUBLISHED: 06-28-2013
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
We report the photoluminescence (PL) from graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) encapsulated in single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). New PL spectral features originating from GNRs have been detected in the visible spectral range. PL peaks from GNRs have resonant character, and their positions depend on the ribbon geometrical structure in accordance with the theoretical predictions. GNRs were synthesized using confined polymerization and fusion of coronene molecules. GNR@SWCNTs material demonstrates a bright photoluminescence both in infrared (IR) and visible regions. The photoluminescence excitation mapping in the near-IR spectral range has revealed the geometry-dependent shifts of the SWCNT peaks (up to 11 meV in excitation and emission) after the process of polymerization of coronene molecules inside the nanotubes. This behavior has been attributed to the strain of SWCNTs induced by insertion of the coronene molecules.
Related JoVE Video
Chiral-selective growth of single-walled carbon nanotubes on lattice-mismatched epitaxial cobalt nanoparticles.
Sci Rep
PUBLISHED: 02-25-2013
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Controlling chirality in growth of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) is important for exploiting their practical applications. For long it has been conceptually conceived that the structural control of SWNTs is potentially achievable by fabricating nanoparticle catalysts with proper structures on crystalline substrates via epitaxial growth techniques. Here, we have accomplished epitaxial formation of monometallic Co nanoparticles with well-defined crystal structure, and its use as a catalyst in the selective growth of SWNTs. Dynamics of Co nanoparticles formation and SWNT growth inside an atomic-resolution environmental transmission electron microscope at a low CO pressure was recorded. We achieved highly preferential growth of semiconducting SWNTs (~90%) with an exceptionally large population of (6, 5) tubes (53%) in an ambient CO atmosphere. Particularly, we also demonstrated high enrichment in (7, 6) and (9, 4) at a low growth temperature. These findings open new perspectives both for structural control of SWNTs and for elucidating the growth mechanisms.
Related JoVE Video
Growth kinetics of vertically aligned carbon nanotube arrays in clean oxygen-free conditions.
ACS Nano
PUBLISHED: 11-17-2011
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are an important technological system, as well as a fascinating system for studying basic principles of nanomaterials synthesis; yet despite continuing efforts for the past decade many important questions about this process remain largely unexplained. We present a series of parametric ethylene chemical vapor deposition growth studies in a "hot-wall" reactor using ultrapure process gases that reveal the fundamental kinetics of the CNT growth. Our data show that the growth rate is proportional to the concentration of the carbon feedstock and monotonically decreases with the concentration of hydrogen gas and that the most important parameter determining the rate of the CNT growth is the production rate of active carbon precursor in the gas phase reaction. The growth termination times obtained with the purified gas mixtures were strikingly insensitive to variations in both hydrogen and ethylene pressures ruling out the carbon encapsulation of the catalyst as the main process termination cause.
Related JoVE Video
Selective growth of SWNTs on partially reduced monometallic cobalt catalyst.
Chem. Commun. (Camb.)
PUBLISHED: 11-24-2010
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
SiO(2) supported cobalt (Co) catalyst could be partially reduced and anchored by unreduced Co ions during a carbon monoxide (CO) chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process. This resulted in the formation of sub-nanometre metallic Co clusters catalyzing the growth of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with a narrow diameter distribution.
Related JoVE Video
Predominant (6,5) single-walled carbon nanotube growth on a copper-promoted iron catalyst.
J. Am. Chem. Soc.
PUBLISHED: 09-23-2010
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
We have developed a magnesia (MgO)-supported iron-copper (FeCu) catalyst to accomplish the growth of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) using carbon monoxide (CO) as the carbon source at ambient pressure. The FeCu catalyst system facilitates the growth of small-diameter SWNTs with a narrow diameter distribution. UV-vis-NIR optical absorption spectra and photoluminescence excitation (PLE) mapping were used to evaluate the relative quantities of the different (n,m) species. We have also demonstrated that the addition of Cu to the Fe catalyst can also cause a remarkable increase in the yield of SWNTs. Finally, a growth mechanism for the FeCu-catalyzed synthesis of SWNTs has been proposed.
Related JoVE Video
Mechanism and kinetics of growth termination in controlled chemical vapor deposition growth of multiwall carbon nanotube arrays.
Nano Lett.
PUBLISHED: 01-17-2009
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
We have investigated growth kinetics of multiwall carbon nanotube (MWCNT) arrays produced by catalytic thermal decomposition of ethylene gas in hydrogen, water, and argon mixture. The MWCNT growth rate exhibits a nonmonotonic dependence on total pressure and reaches a maximum at approximately 750 Torr of total pressure. Water concentrations in excess of 3000 ppm lead to the decrease in the observed growth rate. Optimal pressure and water concentration combination results in a reliable growth of well-aligned MWCNT arrays at a maximum growth rate of approximately 30 microm/min. These MWCNT arrays can reach heights of up to 1 mm with typical standard deviations for the array height of less than 8% over a large number of process runs spread over the time of 8 months. Nanotube growth rate in this optimal growth region remains essentially constant until growth reaches an abrupt and irreversible termination. We present a quantitative model that shows how accumulation of the amorphous carbon patches at the catalyst particle surface and the carbon diffusion to the growing nanotube perimeter causes this abrupt growth cessation. The influence of the partial pressures of ethylene and hydrogen on the ethylene decomposition driving force explains the nonlinear behavior of the growth rate as a function of total process pressure.
Related JoVE Video
Cytotoxic effects of chemotherapeutic drugs and heterocyclic compounds at application on the cells of primary culture of neuroepithelium tumors.
Med Chem
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Neuroepithelial tumor cells were cultured in vitro. The biopsy material was taken from 93 children at removal of the brain tumors during neurosurgical operations. The individual features of the cells sensitivity of primary cultures in respect to protocol-approved chemotherapy drugs and changes in the Interleukin-6 (Il-6) level in the culture medium after the application of chemotherapy were established. The initial level of Il-6 exceeded 600.0 pg/ml in the cultural medium with histologically verified pilomyxoid astrocytoma cells, and ranged from 100.0 to 200.0 pg/ml in the medium at cultivation of ganglioneuroblastoma and pilocytic astrocytoma. A decrease in the Il-6 level in the medium culture of primary tumors cells was observed after the application of chemotherapeutic agents on the cells of pilomyxoid astrocytoma, astrocytomas, and pilocytic desmoplastic/nodular medulloblastoma. The production of Il-6 increased after application of cytostatic drugs on the cells of oligoastrocytomas. A decrease in Il-6 level after application of Cisplatin and Methotrexate and a 5-10 fold increase in the level of Il-6 after application of Etoposide, Carboplatin, Cytarabine, and Gemcitabine were registered in the medium with ganglioneuroblastoma. To improve the cytotoxic action of chemotherapeutic agents, the combined application of cytostatics with heterocyclic compounds was carried out. A computer modeling of ligand-protein complexes of carbamide using the Dock 6.4 and USF Chimera program packages was performed with molecular mechanics method. Special attention was drawn to the ability of several isoxazole heterocycles and isothiazolyl to inhibit the tyrosine kinase. It was proved in vitro that the joint application of chemotherapeutic agents and heterocyclic compounds could reduce the concentration of the cytostatic factor by 10 or more times, having maintained the maximum cytotoxic effect. It was assumed that the target amplification of cytotoxic action of chemotherapeutic agents had prospects for reducing toxic side effects of chemotherapy in vivo, which would be carried out only after the preclinical studies.
Related JoVE Video

What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.