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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Impact of comorbidities on the treatment of atopic dermatitis in clinical practice.
Int J Clin Pharmacol Ther
PUBLISHED: 08-06-2014
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Atopic dermatitis is often associated with atopic comorbidities such as allergic rhinitis, allergic asthma and food allergy. The aim of the present study was to analyze treatment data pertaining to atopic dermatitis patients in Germany with regard to the presence of other atopic comorbidities in the primary care and to investigate whether the presence of atopic codiagnoses has an impact on the treatment of atopic dermatitis (AD) patients.
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The allergic emergency--management of severe allergic reactions.
J Dtsch Dermatol Ges
PUBLISHED: 01-06-2014
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Anaphylaxis is characterized by the sudden onset of acute allergic symptoms involving two or more organ systems. An acute allergic emergency is a challenge for physicians due to its life-threatening potential. The incidence of anaphylactic reactions has increased in recent years. Most frequent elicitors of mast cell and primarily histamine dependent anaphylactic reactions are food, insect venom or drugs. Allergic -reactions are graded into four groups according to the classification by Ring and Messmer; grade I is defined by the onset of cutaneous symptoms only whereas grade IV is characterized by cardiovascular shock as well as cardiac and/or respiratory arrest. The treatment of allergic reactions should be guided by the severity of the reaction. Initially an intramuscular epinephrine injection into the lateral thigh should be given if cutaneous, mucosal and cardiovascular/respiratory symptoms occur. Additionally, the patient should receive intravenous antihistamines and corticosteroids. For self-treatment in the case of an allergic emergency, oral antihistamines and corticosteroids should be prescribed to the patient.
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Treatment outcomes of AIDS-associated Kaposi's sarcoma under a routine antiretroviral therapy program in Lilongwe, Malawi: bleomycin/vincristine compared to vincristine monotherapy.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
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Despite Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) being the most prevalent AIDS-associated cancer in resource limited settings, optimal treatment options remain unknown. We assessed whether bleomycin/vincristine compared to vincristine monotherapy was associated with improved treatment outcomes for AIDS-associated KS among patients initiating combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) in Malawi.
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Age-related changes in the mitochondrial proteome of the fungus Podospora anserina analyzed by 2D-DIGE and LC-MS/MS.
J Proteomics
PUBLISHED: 05-15-2013
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Many questions concerning the molecular processes during biological aging remain unanswered. Since mitochondria are central players in aging, we applied quantitative two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) coupled to protein identification by mass spectrometry to study the age-dependent changes in the mitochondrial proteome of the fungus Podospora anserina - a well-established aging model. 67 gel spots exhibited significant, but remarkably moderate intensity changes. While typically the observed changes in protein abundance occurred progressively with age, for several proteins a pronounced change was observed at late age, sometimes inverting the trend observed at younger age. The identified proteins were assigned to a wide range of metabolic pathways including several implicated previously in biological aging. An overall decrease for subunits of complexes I and V of oxidative phosphorylation was confirmed by Western blot analysis and blue-native electrophoresis. Changes in several groups of proteins suggested a general increase in protein biosynthesis possibly reflecting a compensatory mechanism for increased quality control-related protein degradation at later age. Age-related augmentation in abundance of proteins involved in biosynthesis, folding, and protein degradation pathways sustain these observations. Furthermore, a significant decrease of two enzymes involved in the degradation of ?-aminobutyrate (GABA) supported its previously suggested involvement in biological aging.
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A Genome-Wide Longitudinal Transcriptome Analysis of the Aging Model Podospora anserine.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
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Aging of biological systems is controlled by various processes which have a potential impact on gene expression. Here we report a genome-wide transcriptome analysis of the fungal aging model Podospora anserina. Total RNA of three individuals of defined age were pooled and analyzed by SuperSAGE (serial analysis of gene expression). A bioinformatics analysis identified different molecular pathways to be affected during aging. While the abundance of transcripts linked to ribosomes and to the proteasome quality control system were found to decrease during aging, those associated with autophagy increase, suggesting that autophagy may act as a compensatory quality control pathway. Transcript profiles associated with the energy metabolism including mitochondrial functions were identified to fluctuate during aging. Comparison of wild-type transcripts, which are continuously down-regulated during aging, with those down-regulated in the long-lived, copper-uptake mutant grisea, validated the relevance of age-related changes in cellular copper metabolism. Overall, we (i) present a unique age-related data set of a longitudinal study of the experimental aging model P. anserina which represents a reference resource for future investigations in a variety of organisms, (ii) suggest autophagy to be a key quality control pathway that becomes active once other pathways fail, and (iii) present testable predictions for subsequent experimental investigations.
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Reactive oxygen species target specific tryptophan site in the mitochondrial ATP synthase.
Biochim. Biophys. Acta
PUBLISHED: 09-12-2011
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The release of reactive oxygen species (ROS) as side products of aerobic metabolism in the mitochondria is an unavoidable consequence. As the capacity of organisms to deal with this exposure declines with age, accumulation of molecular damage caused by ROS has been defined as one of the central events during the ageing process in biological systems as well as in numerous diseases such as Alzheimers and Parkinsons Dementia. In the filamentous fungus Podospora anserina, an ageing model with a clear defined mitochondrial etiology of ageing, in addition to the mitochondrial aconitase the ATP synthase alpha subunit was defined recently as a hot spot for oxidative modifications induced by ROS. In this report we show, that this reactivity is not randomly distributed over the ATP Synthase, but is channeled to a single tryptophan residue 503. This residue serves as an intra-molecular quencher for oxidative species and might also be involved in the metabolic perception of oxidative stress or regulation of enzyme activity. A putative metal binding site in the proximity of this tryptophan residue appears to be crucial for the molecular mechanism for the selective targeting of oxidative damage.
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Alternative oxidase dependent respiration leads to an increased mitochondrial content in two long-lived mutants of the aging model Podospora anserina.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-07-2011
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The retrograde response constitutes an important signalling pathway from mitochondria to the nucleus which induces several genes to allow compensation of mitochondrial impairments. In the filamentous ascomycete Podospora anserina, an example for such a response is the induction of a nuclear-encoded and iron-dependent alternative oxidase (AOX) occurring when cytochrome-c oxidase (COX) dependent respiration is affected. Several long-lived mutants are known which predominantly or exclusively respire via AOX. Here we show that two AOX-utilising mutants, grisea and PaCox17::ble, are able to compensate partially for lowered OXPHOS efficiency resulting from AOX-dependent respiration by increasing mitochondrial content. At the physiological level this is demonstrated by an elevated oxygen consumption and increased heat production. However, in the two mutants, ATP levels do not reach WT levels. Interestingly, mutant PaCox17::ble is characterized by a highly increased release of the reactive oxygen species (ROS) hydrogen peroxide. Both grisea and PaCox17::ble contain elevated levels of mitochondrial proteins involved in quality control, i. e. LON protease and the molecular chaperone HSP60. Taken together, our work demonstrates that AOX-dependent respiration in two mutants of the ageing model P. anserina is linked to a novel mechanism involved in the retrograde response pathway, mitochondrial biogenesis, which might also play an important role for cellular maintenance in other organisms.
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A potential impact of DNA repair on ageing and lifespan in the ageing model organism Podospora anserina: decrease in mitochondrial DNA repair activity during ageing.
Mech. Ageing Dev.
PUBLISHED: 03-19-2009
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The free radical theory of ageing states that ROS play a key role in age-related decrease in mitochondrial function via the damage of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA), proteins and lipids. In the sexually reproducing ascomycete Podospora anserina ageing is, as in other eukaryotes, associated with mtDNA instability and mitochondrial dysfunction. Part of the mtDNA instabilities may arise due to accumulation of ROS induced mtDNA lesions, which, as previously suggested for mammals, may be caused by an age-related decrease in base excision repair (BER). Alignments of known BER protein sequences with the P. anserina genome revealed high homology. We report for the first time the presence of BER activities in P. anserina mitochondrial extracts. DNA glycosylase activities decrease with age, suggesting that the increased mtDNA instability with age may be caused by decreased ability to repair mtDNA damage and hence contribute to ageing and lifespan control in this ageing model. Additionally, we find low DNA glycosylase activities in the long-lived mutants grisea and DeltaPaCox17::ble, which are characterized by low mitochondrial ROS generation. Overall, our data identify a potential role of mtDNA repair in controlling ageing and life span in P. anserina, a mechanism possibly regulated in response to ROS levels.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.