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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Phagocytosis of photoreceptor outer segments by transplanted human neural stem cells as a neuroprotective mechanism in retinal degeneration.
Invest. Ophthalmol. Vis. Sci.
PUBLISHED: 09-19-2013
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Transplantation of human central nervous system stem cells (HuCNS-SC) into the subretinal space of Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) rats preserves photoreceptors and visual function. To explore possible mechanism(s) of action underlying this neuroprotective effect, we performed a detailed morphologic and ultrastructure analysis of HuCNS-SC transplanted retinas.
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Clinical translation of human neural stem cells.
Stem Cell Res Ther
PUBLISHED: 08-29-2013
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Human neural stem cell transplants have potential as therapeutic candidates to treat a vast number of disorders of the central nervous system (CNS). StemCells, Inc. has purified human neural stem cells and developed culture conditions for expansion and banking that preserve their unique biological properties. The biological activity of these human central nervous system stem cells (HuCNS-SC®) has been analyzed extensively in vitro and in vivo. When formulated for transplantation, the expanded and cryopreserved banked cells maintain their stem cell phenotype, self-renew and generate mature oligodendrocytes, neurons and astrocytes, cells normally found in the CNS. In this overview, the rationale and supporting data for pursuing neuroprotective strategies and clinical translation in the three components of the CNS (brain, spinal cord and eye) are described. A phase I trial for a rare myelin disorder and phase I/II trial for spinal cord injury are providing intriguing data relevant to the biological properties of neural stem cells, and the early clinical outcomes compel further development.
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Translating stem cell studies to the clinic for CNS repair: current state of the art and the need for a Rosetta stone.
Neuron
PUBLISHED: 05-05-2011
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Since their discovery twenty years ago and prospective isolation a decade later, neural stem cells (NSCs), their progenitors, and differentiated cell derivatives along with other stem-cell based strategies have advanced steadily toward clinical trials, spurred by the immense need to find reparative therapeutics for central nervous system (CNS) diseases and injury. Current phase I/II trials using stem cells in the CNS are the vanguard for the widely anticipated next generation of regenerative therapies and as such are pioneering the stem cell therapy process. While translation has typically been the purview of industry, academic researchers are increasingly driven to bring their findings toward treatments and face challenges in knowledge gap and resource access that are accentuated by the unique financial, manufacturing, scientific, and regulatory aspects of cell therapy. Solutions are envisioned that both address the significant unmet medical need and lead to increased funding for basic and translational research.
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Neuroprotection of host cells by human central nervous system stem cells in a mouse model of infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis.
Cell Stem Cell
PUBLISHED: 05-20-2009
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Infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (INCL) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease caused by a deficiency in the lysosomal enzyme palmitoyl protein thioesterase-1 (PPT1). Ppt1 knockout mice display hallmarks of INCL and mimic the human pathology: accumulation of lipofuscin, degeneration of CNS neurons, and a shortened life span. Purified non-genetically modified human CNS stem cells, grown as neurospheres (hCNS-SCns), were transplanted into the brains of immunodeficient Ppt1(-/)(-) mice where they engrafted robustly, migrated extensively, and produced sufficient levels of PPT1 to alter host neuropathology. Grafted mice displayed reduced autofluorescent lipofuscin, significant neuroprotection of host hippocampal and cortical neurons, and delayed loss of motor coordination. Early intervention with cellular transplants of hCNS-SCns into the brains of INCL patients may supply a continuous and long-lasting source of the missing PPT1 and provide some therapeutic benefit through protection of endogenous neurons. These data provide the experimental basis for human clinical trials with these banked hCNS-SCns.
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Transplantation of human central nervous system stem cells - neuroprotection in retinal degeneration.
Eur. J. Neurosci.
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Stem cells derived from the human brain and grown as neurospheres (HuCNS-SC) have been shown to be effective in treating central neurodegenerative conditions in a variety of animal models. Human safety data in neurodegenerative disorders are currently being accrued. In the present study, we explored the efficacy of HuCNS-SC in a rodent model of retinal degeneration, the Royal College of Surgeons (RCS) rat, and extended our previous cell transplantation studies to include an in-depth examination of donor cell behavior and phenotype post-transplantation. As a first step, we have shown that HuCNS-SC protect host photoreceptors and preserve visual function after transplantation into the subretinal space of postnatal day 21 RCS rats. Moreover, cone photoreceptor density remained relatively constant over several months, consistent with the sustained visual acuity and luminance sensitivity functional outcomes. The novel findings of this study include the characterization and quantification of donor cell radial migration from the injection site and within the subretinal space as well as the demonstration that donor cells maintain an immature phenotype throughout the 7 months of the experiment and undergo very limited proliferation with no evidence of uncontrolled growth or tumor-like formation. Given the efficacy findings and lack of adverse events in the RCS rat in combination with the results from ongoing clinical investigations, HuCNS-SC appear to be a well-suited candidate for cell therapy in retinal degenerative conditions.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.