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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Prevention of erectile dysfunction after radiotherapy for prostate cancer.
Asian J. Androl.
PUBLISHED: 08-19-2014
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With increasing scrutiny of prostate cancer (PCa) diagnosis and treatment, much attention has been given to the morbidity caused by radical prostatectomy (RP) and/or radiotherapy (RT). One of the most common side-effects of either treatment is erectile dysfunction (ED). [1] Approximately, 40% of patients will experience ED after RT for PCa. The post-RT ED causes significant patient dissatisfaction with cancer treatment as well as decrease in patient and partner psychosocial function. [2] To address this issue in patients undergoing RT, Pisansky et al. [3] conducted a prospective, randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial to assess the efficacy of a phosphodiesterase enzyme-5 inhibitor (PDE5i), tadalafil, as a preventive measure for patients undergoing RT for PCa and found no difference in erectile function between the control and treatment groups.
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Impact of low testosterone on response to treatment with tadalafil 5 mg once daily for erectile dysfunction.
Urology
PUBLISHED: 02-14-2014
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To evaluate, posthoc, the relationship between serum total testosterone and response to therapy in a study of tadalafil once daily for erectile dysfunction (ED).
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All men with vasculogenic erectile dysfunction require a cardiovascular workup.
Am. J. Med.
PUBLISHED: 01-16-2014
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An association between erectile dysfunction and cardiovascular disease has long been recognized, and studies suggest that erectile dysfunction is an independent marker of cardiovascular disease risk. Therefore, assessment and management of erectile dysfunction may help identify and reduce the risk of future cardiovascular events, particularly in younger men. The initial erectile dysfunction evaluation should distinguish between predominantly vasculogenic erectile dysfunction and erectile dysfunction of other etiologies. For men believed to have predominantly vasculogenic erectile dysfunction, we recommend that initial cardiovascular risk stratification be based on the Framingham Risk Score. Management of men with erectile dysfunction who are at low risk for cardiovascular disease should focus on risk-factor control; men at high risk, including those with cardiovascular symptoms, should be referred to a cardiologist. Intermediate-risk men should undergo noninvasive evaluation for subclinical atherosclerosis. A growing body of evidence supports the use of emerging prognostic markers to further understand cardiovascular risk in men with erectile dysfunction, but few markers have been prospectively evaluated in this population. In conclusion, we support cardiovascular risk stratification and risk-factor management in all men with vasculogenic erectile dysfunction.
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Peyronies disease: epidemiology, diagnosis, and management.
Curr Med Res Opin
PUBLISHED: 09-30-2013
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Abstract Objective: Peyronies disease (PD) is a progressive fibrotic disorder of the penis that is characterized by formation of collagen plaques on the tunica albuginea of the penis that may result in penile deformity, pain (typically early in the disease course), and often occurs in conjunction with erectile dysfunction. This reviews purpose is to raise awareness of PD among primary care physicians, who are likely to provide the initial diagnosis and information to patients. Methods: PubMed was searched for articles related to epidemiology, diagnosis, and management of PD. Reference lists of relevant articles were also examined for further pertinent research. Following the goals of this review, references were selected based on their appropriateness for a primary care audience. Results: The symptoms of PD may physically limit intercourse and impose a severe physical and psychological burden. The course of PD includes an early inflammatory phase that may last 1-18 months and a subsequent stable phase. In the early phase, patients may experience penile pain as the tunical plaque develops. During the stable phase, the plaque becomes more organized, penile curvature stabilizes, and the pain usually subsides. Currently, there are no US Food and Drug Administration approved therapies that have shown significant efficacy for PD. Nonsurgical treatment options are often used to manage PD with variable success. Most studies of nonsurgical management of PD are small, poorly controlled, and include patients in variable disease stages. Surgical treatment of PD is reserved for stable patients with erectile dysfunction and penile deformity that impairs sexual function. Conclusion: PD is frequently undiagnosed. Even when PD is correctly identified, choice of treatment is problematic, based on the limited currently available clinical data demonstrating clinical benefits associated with treatment. Newer medications in clinical testing seem to offer some potential benefit for men with PD, though further research is necessary.
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A Return to Normal Erectile Function with Tadalafil Once Daily after an Incomplete Response to As-Needed PDE5 Inhibitor Therapy.
J Sex Med
PUBLISHED: 07-10-2013
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An optimal outcome of an erectile dysfunction (ED) treatment is to enable a return to normal erectile function (as defined by an International Index of Erectile Function-Erectile Function [IIEF-EF] domain score ?26). As-needed (PRN) phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE5) inhibitor treatment does not always result in a return-to-normal erectile function.
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Bladder outlet obstruction triggers neural plasticity in sensory pathways and contributes to impaired sensitivity in erectile dysfunction.
Am. J. Physiol. Regul. Integr. Comp. Physiol.
PUBLISHED: 03-27-2013
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Lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) and erectile dysfunction (ED) are common problems in aging males worldwide. The objective of this work was to evaluate the effects of bladder neck nerve damage induced by partial bladder outlet obstruction (PBOO) on sensory innervation of the corpus cavernosum (CC) and CC smooth muscle (CCSM) using a rat model of PBOO induced by a partial ligation of the bladder neck. Retrograde labeling technique was used to label dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons that innervate the urinary bladder and CC. Contractility and relaxation of the CCSM was studied in vitro, and expression of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) was evaluated by Western blotting. Concentration of the sensory neuropeptides substance P (SP) and calcitonin gene-related peptide was measured by ELISA. Partial obstruction of the bladder neck caused a significant hypertrophy of the urinary bladders (2.5-fold increase at 2 wk). Analysis of L6-S2 DRG sections determined that sensory ganglia received input from both the urinary bladder and CC with 5-7% of all neurons double labeled from both organs. The contractile responses of CC muscle strips to KCl and phenylephrine were decreased after PBOO, followed by a reduced relaxation response to nitroprusside. A significant decrease in neuronal NOS expression, but not in endothelial NOS or protein kinase G (PKG-1), was detected in the CCSM of the obstructed animals. Additionally, PBOO caused some impairment to sensory nerves as evidenced by a fivefold downregulation of SP in the CC (P ? 0.001). Our results provide evidence that PBOO leads to the impairment of bladder neck afferent innervation followed by a decrease in CCSM relaxation, downregulation of nNOS expression, and reduced content of sensory neuropeptides in the CC smooth muscle. These results suggest that nerve damage in PBOO may contribute to LUTS-ED comorbidity and trigger secondary changes in the contraction/relaxation mechanisms of CCSM.
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The resurgence of the vacuum erection device (VED) for treatment of erectile dysfunction.
J Sex Med
PUBLISHED: 01-24-2013
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Vacuum erection devices (VEDs) have been approved in the United States since 1982 and offer a viable alternative to oral phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitors (PDE5i), injections and transurethral suppositories. Studies have demonstrated efficacy in erectile dysfunction (ED) associated with a variety of conditions. More recently, this modality has been evaluated in initial phosphodiesterase inhibitor nonresponders as well as for post-prostatectomy penile rehabilitation.
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Diagnosis and treatment of erectile dysfunction for reduction of cardiovascular risk.
J. Urol.
PUBLISHED: 01-09-2013
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We established erectile dysfunction as an often neglected but valuable marker of cardiovascular risk, particularly in younger men and men with diabetes. We also reviewed evidence that lifestyle change, combined with informed prescribing of pharmacotherapies used to mitigate cardiovascular risk, can improve overall vascular health and sexual functioning in men with erectile dysfunction.
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Testosterone regulates smooth muscle contractile pathways in the rat prostate: emphasis on PDE5 signaling.
Am. J. Physiol. Endocrinol. Metab.
PUBLISHED: 10-25-2011
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Testosterone (T) plays a permissive role in the development of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), and phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors (PDE5is) have been found to be effective for BPH and lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) in clinical trials. This study investigated the effect of T on smooth muscle (SM) contractile and regulatory signaling pathways, including PDE5 expression and functional activity in prostate in male rats (sham-operated, surgically castrated, and castrated with T supplementation). In vitro organ bath studies, real-time RT-PCR, Western blot analysis, and immunohistochemistry were performed. Castration heavily attenuated contractility, including sensitivity to phenylephrine with SM myosin immunostaining revealing a disrupted SM cell arrangement in the stroma. PDE5 was immunolocalized exclusively in the prostate stroma, and orchiectomy signficantly reduced PDE5 immunopositivity, mRNA, and protein expression, along with nNOS and ROK? mRNA, whereas it increased eNOS plus ?(1a) and ?(1b) adrenoreceptor expression in castrated animals. The PDE5i zaprinast significantly increased prostate strip relaxation to the nitric oxide donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP) in control but not castrated rats. But SNP alone was more effective on castrated rats, comparable with sham treated with SNP plus zaprinast. T supplementation prevented or restored all above changes, including SNP and zaprinast in vitro responsiveness. In conclusion, our data show that T positively regulates PDE5 expression and functional activities in prostate, and T ablation not only suppresses prostate size but also reduces prostatic SM contractility, with several potential SM contraction/relaxation pathways implicated. Zaprinast findings strongly suggest a major role for PDE5/cGMP in this signaling cascade. PDE5 inhibition may represent a novel mechanism for treatment of BPH.
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Benign prostatic hyperplasia evaluation and management by urologists and primary care physicians: practice patterns from the observational BPH registry.
J. Urol.
PUBLISHED: 07-24-2011
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We examined the evaluation of and management for lower urinary tract symptoms/benign prostatic hyperplasia by physician specialty (urologist vs primary care physician).
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Blebbistain, a myosin II inhibitor, as a novel strategy to regulate detrusor contractility in a rat model of partial bladder outlet obstruction.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 06-09-2011
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Partial bladder outlet obstruction (PBOO), a common urologic pathology mostly caused by benign prostatic hyperplasia, can coexist in 40-45% of patients with overactive bladder (OAB) and is associated with detrusor overactivity (DO). PBOO that induces DO results in alteration in bladder myosin II type and isoform composition. Blebbistatin (BLEB) is a myosin II inhibitor we recently demonstrated potently relaxed normal detrusor smooth muscle (SM) and reports suggest varied BLEB efficacy for different SM myosin (SMM) isoforms and/or SMM vs nonmuscle myosin (NMM). We hypothesize BLEB inhibition of myosin II as a novel contraction protein targeted strategy to regulate DO. Using a surgically-induced male rat PBOO model, organ bath contractility, competitive and Real-Time-RT-PCR were performed. It was found that obstructed-bladder weight significantly increased 2.74-fold while in vitro contractility of detrusor to various stimuli was impaired ?50% along with decreased shortening velocity. Obstruction also altered detrusor spontaneous activities with significantly increased amplitude but depressed frequency. PBOO switched bladder from a phasic-type to a more tonic-type SM. Expression of 5 myosin heavy chain (MHC) alternatively spliced isoform SM-A (associated with tonic-type SM) increased 3-fold while 3 MHC SM1 and essential light chain isoform MLC(17b) also exhibited increased relative expression. Total SMMHC expression was decreased by 25% while the expression of NMM IIB (SMemb) was greatly increased by 4.5-fold. BLEB was found to completely relax detrusor strips from both sham-operated and PBOO rats pre-contracted with KCl, carbachol or electrical field stimulation although sensitivity was slightly decreased (20%) only at lower doses for PBOO. Thus we provide the first thorough characterization of the response of rat bladder myosin to PBOO and demonstrate complete BLEB-induced PBOO bladder SM relaxation. Furthermore, the present study provides valuable evidence that BLEB may be a novel type of potential therapeutic agent for regulation of myogenic and nerve-evoked DO in OAB.
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The NERI Hypogonadism Screener: psychometric validation in male patients and controls.
Clin. Endocrinol. (Oxf)
PUBLISHED: 05-10-2011
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Hypogonadism (HG) is a clinical disorder consisting of reduced testosterone (T) levels and characteristic signs and symptoms of low T. Current instruments used to assess hypogonadal symptoms in men lack adequate measurement properties. To present data on the quantitative validation of a new self-report instrument (HG Screener) developed to identify men with symptoms of HG.
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Onset of efficacy of tadalafil once daily in men with erectile dysfunction: a randomized, double-blind, placebo controlled trial.
J. Urol.
PUBLISHED: 02-24-2010
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We evaluated the efficacy onset and safety of tadalafil 2.5 and 5 mg once daily for 14 days compared with placebo in men with erectile dysfunction.
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Standards for clinical trials in male sexual dysfunctions.
J Sex Med
PUBLISHED: 01-23-2010
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Clinical trials in male sexual dysfunction (MSD) are expanding. Consequently, there is a need for consensus standards in this area.
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Association of sexual dysfunction with lower urinary tract symptoms of BPH and BPH medical therapies: results from the BPH Registry.
Urology
PUBLISHED: 01-23-2009
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The severity of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) has correlated with erectile dysfunction (ED) and ejaculatory dysfunction (EjD) in large-scale epidemiologic studies. ED and EjD are also side effects of some medical therapies for LUTS suggestive of benign prostatic hyperplasia (LUTS/BPH). These relationships were examined in a physician office-based population of men enrolled in the BPH Registry.
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Efficacy and safety of once-daily tadalafil in men with erectile dysfunction who reported no successful intercourse attempts at baseline.
J Sex Med
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Tadalafil is efficacious and well tolerated for erectile dysfunction (ED), but effects in men with "complete ED" are unclear.
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The Princeton III Consensus recommendations for the management of erectile dysfunction and cardiovascular disease.
Mayo Clin. Proc.
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The Princeton Consensus (Expert Panel) Conference is a multispecialty collaborative tradition dedicated to optimizing sexual function and preserving cardiovascular health. The third Princeton Consensus met November 8 to 10, 2010, and had 2 primary objectives. The first objective focused on the evaluation and management of cardiovascular risk in men with erectile dysfunction (ED) and no known cardiovascular disease (CVD), with particular emphasis on identification of men with ED who may require additional cardiologic work-up. The second objective focused on reevaluation and modification of previous recommendations for evaluation of cardiac risk associated with sexual activity in men with known CVD. The Panels recommendations build on those developed during the first and second Princeton Consensus Conferences, first emphasizing the use of exercise ability and stress testing to ensure that each mans cardiovascular health is consistent with the physical demands of sexual activity before prescribing treatment for ED, and second highlighting the link between ED and CVD, which may be asymptomatic and may benefit from cardiovascular risk reduction.
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Prognostic utility of erectile dysfunction for cardiovascular disease in younger men and those with diabetes.
Am. Heart J.
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Multiple published studies have established erectile dysfunction (ED) as an independent risk marker for cardiovascular disease (CVD). In fact, incident ED has a similar or greater predictive value for cardiovascular events than traditional risk factors including smoking, hyperlipidemia, and family history of myocardial infarction. Here, we review evidence that supports ED as a particularly significant harbinger of CVD in 2 populations: men <60 years of age and those with diabetes. Although addition of ED to the Framingham Risk Score only modestly improved the 10-year predictive capacity of the Framingham Risk Score for myocardial infarction or coronary death data in men enrolled in the Massachusetts Male Aging Study, other epidemiologic studies suggest that the predictive value of ED is quite strong in younger men. Indeed, in the Olmstead County Study, men 40 to 49 years of age with ED had a 50-fold higher incidence of new-incident coronary artery disease than those without ED. However, ED had less predictive value (5-fold increased risk) for coronary artery disease in men 70 years and older. Several studies, including a large analysis of more than 6300 men enrolled in the ADVANCE study, suggest that ED is a particularly powerful predictor of CVD in diabetic men as well. Based on the literature reviewed here, we encourage physicians to inquire about ED symptoms in all men more than 30 years of age with cardiovascular risk factors. Identification of ED, particularly in men <60 years old and those with diabetes, represents an important first step toward CVD risk detection and reduction.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.