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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Increasing frequency of severe clinical toxicity after use of 2,4-dinitrophenol in the UK: a report from the National Poisons Information Service.
Emerg Med J
PUBLISHED: 06-25-2014
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2,4-Dinitrophenol (DNP) increases energy consumption by uncoupling oxidative phosphorylation. Although not licensed as a medicine, it is sometimes used by 'body sculptors' and for weight loss as a 'fat burning' agent. This research was performed to characterise patterns of presentation, clinical features and outcomes of patients reported to the National Poisons Information Service (NPIS) in the UK after exposure to DNP.
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Was the death of Alexander the Great due to poisoning? Was it Veratrum album?
Clin Toxicol (Phila)
PUBLISHED: 12-26-2013
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Objective. To investigate the death of Alexander the Great to determine if he died from natural causes or was poisoned and, if the latter, what was the most likely poison. Methods. OVID MEDLINE (January 1950-May 2013) and ISI Web of Science (1900-May 2013) databases were searched and bibliographies of identified articles were screened for additional relevant studies. These searches identified 53 relevant citations. Classical literature associated with Alexanders death. There are two divergent accounts of Alexanders death. The first has its origins in the Royal Diary, allegedly kept in Alexanders court. The second account survives in various versions of the Alexander Romance. Nature of the terminal illness. The Royal Diary describes a gradual onset of fever, with a progressive inability to walk, leading to Alexanders death, without offering a cause of his demise. In contrast, the Romance implies that members of Alexanders inner circle conspired to poison him. The various medical hypotheses include cumulative debilitation from his previous wounds, the complications of alcohol imbibing (resulting in alcohol hepatitis, acute pancreatitis, or perforated peptic ulcer), grief, a congenital abnormality, and an unhealthy environment in Babylon possibly exacerbated by malaria, typhoid fever, or some other parasitic or viral illness. Was it poisoning? Of all the chemical and botanical poisons reviewed, we believe the alkaloids present in the various Veratrum species, notably Veratrum album, were capable of killing Alexander with comparable symptoms to those Alexander reportedly experienced over the 12 days of his illness. Veratrum poisoning is heralded by the sudden onset of epigastric and substernal pain, which may also be accompanied by nausea and vomiting, followed by bradycardia and hypotension with severe muscular weakness. Alexander suffered similar features for the duration of his illness. Conclusion. If Alexander the Great was poisoned, Veratrum album offers a more plausible cause than arsenic, strychnine, and other botanical poisons.
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Reported toxicity in 1486 liquid detergent capsule exposures to the UK National Poisons Information Service 2009-2012, including their ophthalmic and CNS effects.
Clin Toxicol (Phila)
PUBLISHED: 11-08-2013
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Context. Data on the ophthalmic and central nervous system (CNS) adverse effects of liquid detergent capsules (liquid laundry pods) are limited. Objective. To ascertain the reported toxicity of liquid detergent capsules, particularly their ophthalmic and CNS adverse effects, in a large case series. Methods. Between 1 May 2009 and 30 July 2012 the UK National Poisons Information Service collected prospectively 1509 telephone enquiries (involving 1486 exposures) relating to liquid detergent capsules. Results. The majority of patients (95.6%) were children aged less than 5. Exposure to these products occurred mainly as a result of ingestion alone (n = 1215; 81.8%), with eye contact alone (n = 110; 7.4%), and skin contact alone (n = 20; 1.3%) being less common; multiple routes of exposure were involved in 141 (9.5%) cases. Following ocular exposure (n = 212), features suggesting conjunctivitis (n = 145; 68.4%) and corneal ulceration (n = 6; 2.8%) developed. The most common features reported following ingestion alone were nausea and vomiting (n = 721; 59.3%), followed by coughing (n = 53; 4.4%), drowsiness/CNS depression (n = 49; 42 of these were children were aged 2 years or less) and foaming at the mouth (n = 47; 3.9%). A rash occurred in 22 patients where ingestion was considered to be the route of exposure. Twenty patients were exposed via the dermal route alone and developed erythema (n = 9), rash (n = 6) and burn (n = 3). Conclusions. Ocular exposure to liquid detergent capsules may lead to conjunctivitis and corneal ulceration; detergent ingestion may result in central nervous system (CNS)depression. Greater consumer awareness is required to reduce injury from liquid detergent capsules, particularly that involving the eye.
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Methoxetamine toxicity reported to the National Poisons Information Service: clinical characteristics and patterns of enquiries (including the period of the introduction of the UKs first Temporary Class Drug Order).
Emerg Med J
PUBLISHED: 01-24-2013
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To report the demographic and clinical characteristics of cases of methoxetamine toxicity reported to The National Poisons Information Service (NPIS) by healthcare professionals. To assess the pattern of enquiries from health professionals to the UK NPIS related to methoxetamine, including the period of the making of the UK first Temporary Class Drug Order (TCDO).
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The clinical toxicology of the designer "party pills" benzylpiperazine and trifluoromethylphenylpiperazine.
Clin Toxicol (Phila)
PUBLISHED: 04-19-2011
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Benzylpiperazine (BZP) and trifluoromethylphenylpiperazine (TFMPP) are synthetic phenylpiperazine analogues. BZP was investigated as a potential antidepressant in the early 1970s but was found unsuitable for this purpose. More recently, BZP and TFMPP have been used as substitutes for amfetamine-derived designer drugs. They were legally available in a number of countries, particularly in New Zealand, and were marketed as party pills, but are now more heavily regulated. This article will review the mechanisms of toxicity, toxicokinetics, clinical features, diagnosis, and management of poisoning due to BZP and TFMPP.
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Arsenical peripheral neuropathy.
Pract Neurol
PUBLISHED: 02-05-2010
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A 49-year-old white man returned urgently to the UK after spending 3 months in Goa. He had a several week history of vomiting, weight loss, a widespread desquamating skin rash, and symptoms and signs of a progressive painful sensorimotor neuropathy. He had a mild normocytic anaemia and lymphopenia. Nerve conduction studies revealed a severe predominantly axonal large fibre sensorimotor neuropathy, confirmed on subsequent sural nerve biopsy. Once he had left Goa most of his symptoms started to rapidly settle although the neuropathic symptoms remained severe. Arsenic poisoning was suspected. A spot urine arsenic concentration was 300 microg/l, confirming the diagnosis. He was treated with chelation therapy. Deliberate arsenic poisoning was highly likely.
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DMPS can reverse the features of severe mercury vapor-induced neurological damage.
Clin Toxicol (Phila)
PUBLISHED: 10-27-2009
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A 36-year-old jewelry producer presented with tremor, slurred speech, lethargy, headache, and incoordination. On examination he had a coarse tremor of the outstretched hands and protruded tongue, slurred speech, "Hatters shakes" handwriting, impaired heel-toe walking and heel-shin coordination, mild dysdiadochokinesis, and constricted visual fields to confrontation. The patient received four 5-day courses of oral 2,3-dimercapto-1-propanesulfonate (30 mg/kg/day), which was associated with substantial objective clinical improvement and the excretion of 99,406 microg mercury.
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A comparison of sodium calcium edetate (edetate calcium disodium) and succimer (DMSA) in the treatment of inorganic lead poisoning.
Clin Toxicol (Phila)
PUBLISHED: 10-27-2009
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This article reviews the experimental and clinical studies that have compared the efficacy (impact on urine lead excretion, blood and tissue lead concentrations, resolution of features and survival) of sodium calcium edetate (edetate calcium disodium) and succimer (DMSA) in the treatment of inorganic lead poisoning. It also summarizes the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic aspects and the adverse effects of treatment.
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Dimercaptosuccinic acid (succimer; DMSA) in inorganic lead poisoning.
Clin Toxicol (Phila)
PUBLISHED: 08-12-2009
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This article reviews data on the efficacy of succimer (dimercaptosuccinic acid, DMSA) in the treatment of human inorganic lead poisoning, the adverse effects associated with its use, and summarizes current understanding of the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic aspects.
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National audit of antidote stocking in acute hospitals in the UK.
Emerg Med J
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Inadequate stocking of essential antidotes in hospitals for the treatment of poisoned patients has been reported worldwide. Joint National Poisons Information Service (NPIS)/College of Emergency Medicine (CEM) guidelines for antidote stocking in UK emergency departments and acute hospitals were published in 2008.
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Hazard of household cleaning products: a study undertaken by the UK National Poisons Information Service.
Clin Toxicol (Phila)
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To ascertain the reported toxicity of current United Kingdom (UK) household products following the launch of new products, such as liquid detergent capsules, and the manufacture of more concentrated formulations.
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The clinical toxicology of ?-hydroxybutyrate, ?-butyrolactone and 1,4-butanediol.
Clin Toxicol (Phila)
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Gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB) and its precursors, gamma-butyrolactone (GBL) and 1,4-butanediol (1,4-BD), are drugs of abuse which act primarily as central nervous system (CNS) depressants. In recent years, the rising recreational use of these drugs has led to an increasing burden upon health care providers. Understanding their toxicity is therefore essential for the successful management of intoxicated patients. We review the epidemiology, mechanisms of toxicity, toxicokinetics, clinical features, diagnosis, and management of poisoning due to GHB and its analogs and discuss the features and management of GHB withdrawal.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.