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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Smc5/6 Coordinates Formation and Resolution of Joint Molecules with Chromosome Morphology to Ensure Meiotic Divisions.
PLoS Genet.
PUBLISHED: 12-01-2013
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DURING MEIOSIS, STRUCTURAL MAINTENANCE OF CHROMOSOME (SMC) COMPLEXES UNDERPIN TWO FUNDAMENTAL FEATURES OF MEIOSIS: homologous recombination and chromosome segregation. While meiotic functions of the cohesin and condensin complexes have been delineated, the role of the third SMC complex, Smc5/6, remains enigmatic. Here we identify specific, essential meiotic functions for the Smc5/6 complex in homologous recombination and the regulation of cohesin. We show that Smc5/6 is enriched at centromeres and cohesin-association sites where it regulates sister-chromatid cohesion and the timely removal of cohesin from chromosomal arms, respectively. Smc5/6 also localizes to recombination hotspots, where it promotes normal formation and resolution of a subset of joint-molecule intermediates. In this regard, Smc5/6 functions independently of the major crossover pathway defined by the MutL? complex. Furthermore, we show that Smc5/6 is required for stable chromosomal localization of the XPF-family endonuclease, Mus81-Mms4(Eme1). Our data suggest that the Smc5/6 complex is required for specific recombination and chromosomal processes throughout meiosis and that in its absence, attempts at cell division with unresolved joint molecules and residual cohesin lead to severe recombination-induced meiotic catastrophe.
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A Mec1- and PP4-dependent checkpoint couples centromere pairing to meiotic recombination.
Dev. Cell
PUBLISHED: 06-20-2010
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The faithful alignment of homologous chromosomes during meiotic prophase requires the coordination of DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair with large-scale chromosome reorganization. Here we identify the phosphatase PP4 (Pph3/Psy2) as a mediator of this process in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In pp4 mutants, early stages of crossover repair and homology-independent pairing of centromeres are coordinately blocked. We traced the loss of centromere pairing to the persistent phosphorylation of the chromosomal protein Zip1 on serine 75. Zip1-S75 is a consensus site for the ATR-like checkpoint kinase Mec1, and centromere pairing is restored in mec1 mutants. Importantly, Zip1-S75 phosphorylation does not alter chromosome synapsis or DSB repair, indicating that Mec1 separates centromere pairing from the other functions of Zip1. The centromeric localization and persistent activity of PP4 during meiotic prophase suggest a model whereby Zip1-S75 phosphorylation dynamically destabilizes homology-independent centromere pairing in response to recombination initiation, thereby coupling meiotic chromosome dynamics to DSB repair.
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Temperature-dependent modulation of chromosome segregation in msh4 mutants of budding yeast.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 08-10-2009
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In many organisms, homologous chromosomes rely upon recombination-mediated linkages, termed crossovers, to promote their accurate segregation at meiosis I. In budding yeast, the evolutionarily conserved mismatch-repair paralogues, Msh4 and Msh5, promote crossover formation in conjunction with several other proteins, collectively termed the Synapsis Initiation Complex (SIC) proteins or ZMMs (Zip1-Zip2-Zip3-Zip4-Spo16, Msh4-Msh5, Mer3). zmm mutants show decreased levels of crossovers and increased chromosome missegregation, which is thought to cause decreased spore viability.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.