JoVE Visualize What is visualize?
Stop Reading. Start Watching.
Advanced Search
Stop Reading. Start Watching.
Regular Search
Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Tumor-to-Tumor Metastasis: Report of Two Cases of Renal Cell Carcinoma Metastasizing to Microcystic Serous Cystadenoma of the Pancreas.
Int. J. Surg. Pathol.
PUBLISHED: 05-31-2014
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Metastatic cancer to the pancreas accounts for less than 2% of all pancreatic malignancies. In contrast to other metastatic tumors, renal cell carcinoma (RCC) has a propensity to metastasize as a solitary pancreatic lesion. While symptomatic patients may present with obstructive jaundice, abdominal pain, or gastrointestinal bleeding, the diagnosis of metastatic pancreatic involvement is often made in asymptomatic patients, during follow-up evaluation in the aftermath of an initial diagnosis of renal cell carcinoma. Microcystic serous cystadenoma of the pancreas is an uncommon pancreatic exocrine neoplasm that morphologically resembles conventional (clear cell) RCC, in so far as both tumors are characterized by neoplastic cells with clear cytoplasm, relatively uniform nuclei and scant associated tumor stroma. Herein, we report 2 immunohistochemically confirmed cases of unsuspected metastatic RCC to the pancreas, with the metastatic tumor in each case confined to a preexisting microcystic serous cystadenoma of the pancreas.
Related JoVE Video
Pelvic floor muscle training in males: practical applications.
Urology
PUBLISHED: 02-01-2014
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
The pelvic floor muscles are vital to male genitourinary health. Pelvic floor muscle training may prove helpful in a variety of clinical circumstances: stress urinary incontinence that follows prostate surgery, overactive bladder, postvoid dribbling, erectile dysfunction, ejaculation issues including premature ejaculation, and pelvic pain due to levator muscle spasm.
Related JoVE Video
Assessing decision-making capacity: a primer for the development of hospital practice guidelines.
HEC Forum
PUBLISHED: 01-15-2014
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Decision making capacity (DMC) is a fundamental concept grounding the principle of respect for autonomy and the practice of obtaining informed consent. DMC must be determined and documented every time a patient undergoes a hospital procedure and for routine care when there is reason to believe decision making ability is compromised. In this paper we explore a path toward ethically informed development and implementation of a hospital policy related to DMC assessment. We begin with a review of the context of DMC assessment before discussing some considerations relevant to policy creation by healthcare ethics committees. The discussion concludes in a presentation of a typology of capacity assessment policies, which draws upon a sampling of currently used hospital policies to illustrate relevant ethical considerations.
Related JoVE Video
Low (20 cGy) doses of 1 GeV/u (56)Fe--particle radiation lead to a persistent reduction in the spatial learning ability of rats.
Radiat. Res.
PUBLISHED: 11-11-2011
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Exposure to galactic cosmic radiation (GCR) is considered to be a potential health risk in long-term space travel, and it represents a significant risk to the central nervous system (CNS). The most harmful component of GCR is the HZE [high-mass, highly charged (Z), high-energy] particles, e.g. (56)Fe. In previous ground-based experiments, exposure to high doses of HZE-particle radiation induced pronounced deficits in hippocampus-dependent learning and memory in rodents. Recent data suggest that glutamatergic transmission in hippocampal synaptosomes is impaired after low (60 cGy) doses of 1 GeV/u (56)Fe particles, which could lead to impairment of hippocampus-dependent spatial memory. To assess the effects of mission-relevant (20-60 cGy) doses of 1 GeV/u (56)Fe particles on hippocampus-dependent spatial memory, male Wistar rats either received sham treatment or were irradiated and tested 3 months later in the Barnes maze test. Compared to the controls, rats that received 20, 40 and 60 cGy 1 GeV/u (56)Fe particles showed significant impairments in their ability to locate the escape box in the Barnes maze, which was manifested by progressively increasing escape latency times over the 3 days of testing. However, this increase was not due to a lack of motivation of the rats to escape, because the total number of head pokes (and especially incorrect head pokes) remained constant over the test period. Given that rats exposed to X rays did not exhibit spatial memory impairments until >10 Gy was delivered, the RBE for 1 GeV/u (56)Fe-particle-induced hippocampal spatial memory impairment is ?50. These data demonstrate that mission-relevant doses of 1 GeV/u (56)Fe particles can result in severe deficits in hippocampus-dependent neurocognitive tasks, and the extreme sensitivity of these processes to 1 GeV/u (56)Fe particles must arise due to the perturbation of multiple processes in addition to killing neuronal cells.
Related JoVE Video
A novel method to quantify histochemical changes throughout the mediolateral axis of the substantia gelatinosa after spared nerve injury: characterization with TRPV1 and substance P.
J Pain
PUBLISHED: 03-31-2010
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Nerve injury dramatically increases or decreases protein expression in the spinal cord dorsal horn. Whether the spatial distribution of these changes is restricted to the central innervation territories of injured nerves or could spread to adjacent territories in the dorsal horn is not understood. To address this question, we developed a simple computer software-assisted method to precisely distinguish and efficiently quantify immunohistochemical staining patterns across the mediolateral axis of the dorsal horn 2 weeks after transection of either the tibial and common peroneal nerves (thus sparing the sural branch, spared nerve injury, [SNI]), the tibial nerve, or the common peroneal and sural nerves. Using thiamine monophosphatase (TMP) histochemistry, we determined that central terminals of the tibial, common peroneal, sural, and posterior cutaneous nerves occupy the medial 35%, medial-central 20%, central-lateral 20%, and lateral 25% of the substantia gelatinosa, respectively. We then used these calculations to show that SNI reduced the expression of SP and TRPV1 immunoreactivity within the tibial and peroneal innervation territories in the L4 dorsal horn, without changing expression in the uninjured, sural sector. We conclude that SNI-induced loss of SP and TRPV1 in central terminals of dorsal horn is restricted to injured fibers. Our new method enables direct comparison of injured and uninjured terminals in the dorsal horn so as to better understand their relative contributions to mechanisms of chronic pain.
Related JoVE Video
Informed consent to tissue donation: policies and practice.
Cell Tissue Bank
PUBLISHED: 09-22-2009
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Nearly 10 years ago, the tissue industrys informed consent practices with donor families in the United States were criticized. In response, the industry, along with the Inspector General of the Department of Health and Human Services, suggested elements to be included in the informed consent process. This study examines which of these elements were present in the informed consent documents of 45 (78%) of the nations 58 Organ Procurement Organizations (OPOs). Some elements, such as involvement of for-profit companies, were present in almost all. Others, such as labeling tissue as a gift from donor families, never were. The authors conclude that the time is ripe for reexamination of the informed consent process with an eye to meaningful consent that promotes the benefits of tissue transplantation and at the same time protects the rights and interests of donor families; can be realistically implemented; and, maintains the trust of the American public.
Related JoVE Video
The role of animal models in evaluating reasonable safety and efficacy for human trials of cell-based interventions for neurologic conditions.
J. Cereb. Blood Flow Metab.
PUBLISHED: 01-31-2009
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Progress in regenerative medicine seems likely to produce new treatments for neurologic conditions that use human cells as therapeutic agents; at least one trial for such an intervention is already under way. The development of cell-based interventions for neurologic conditions (CBI-NCs) will likely include preclinical studies using animals as models for humans with conditions of interest. This paper explores predictive validity challenges and the proper role for animal models in developing CBI-NCs. In spite of limitations, animal models are and will remain an essential tool for gathering data in advance of first-in-human clinical trials. The goal of this paper is to provide a realistic lens for viewing the role of animal models in the context of CBI-NCs and to provide recommendations for moving forward through this challenging terrain.
Related JoVE Video
The cultural context model: how does it facilitate couples therapeutic change?
J Marital Fam Ther
PUBLISHED: 01-24-2009
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
This study examines how therapeutic change in couples is facilitated in the Cultural Context Model based on the models identified family processes: critical consciousness, empowerment, and accountability. Participants included four female therapists and three couples who sought treatment voluntarily, two heterosexual couples, and one lesbian couple with diverse class and ethnic backgrounds who had spent at least 12 months receiving services at the Institute for Family Services and who were compliant with treatment. Videotaped sessions were analyzed by coding descriptive data using a constant comparative analysis method. An analysis of therapeutic interventions and clients changes showed that the model works in four realms: conversational, behavioral, ritual, and community building.
Related JoVE Video
CMS final rule requires NPI submission for Medicare and Medicaid provider enrollments and orders.
Del Med J
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Despite the recent debate in the U.S. Supreme Court regarding the constitutionality of the health care reform act, CMS published a final rule related to several provisions from the Affordable Care Act (the Act).
Related JoVE Video
Attitudes towards euthanasia and assisted suicide: a comparison between psychiatrists and other physicians.
Bioethics
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Euthanasia and physician assisted-suicide are terms used to describe the process in which a doctor of a sick or disabled individual engages in an activity which directly or indirectly leads to their death. This behavior is engaged by the healthcare provider based on their humanistic desire to end suffering and pain. The psychiatrists involvement may be requested in several distinct situations including evaluation of patient capacity when an appeal for euthanasia is requested on grounds of terminal somatic illness or when the patient is requesting euthanasia due to mental suffering. We compare attitudes of 49 psychiatrists towards euthanasia and assisted suicide with a group of 54 other physicians by means of a questionnaire describing different patients, who either requested physician-assisted suicide or in whom euthanasia as a treatment option was considered, followed by a set of questions relating to euthanasia implementation. When controlled for religious practice, psychiatrists expressed more conservative views regarding euthanasia than did physicians from other medical specialties. Similarly female physicians and orthodox physicians indicated more conservative views. Differences may be due to factors inherent in subspecialty education. We suggest that in light of the unique complexity and context of patient euthanasia requests, based on their training and professional expertise psychiatrists are well suited to take a prominent role in evaluating such requests to die and making a decision as to the relative importance of competing variables.
Related JoVE Video

What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.