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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Similar replicative fitness is shared by the subtype B and unique BF recombinant HIV-1 isolates that dominate the epidemic in Argentina.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
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The HIV-1 epidemic in South America is dominated by pure subtypes (mostly B and C) and more than 7 BF and BC recombinant forms. In Argentina, circulating recombinant forms (CRFs) comprised of subtypes B and F make up more than 50% of HIV infections. For this study, 28 HIV-1 primary isolates were obtained from patients in Buenos Aires, Argentina and initially classified into subtype B (n?=?9, 32.1%), C (n?=?1, 3.6%), and CRFs (n?=?18, 64.3%) using partial pol and vpu-env sequences, which proved to be inconsistent and inaccurate for these phylogenetic analyses. Near full length genome sequences of these primary HIV-1 isolates revealed that nearly all intersubtype BF recombination sites were unique and countered previous "CRF" B/F classifications. The majority of these Argentinean HIV-1 isolates were CCR5-using but 4 had a dual/mixed tropism as predicted by both phenotypic and genotypic assays. Comparison of the replicative fitness of these BF primary HIV-1 isolates to circulating B, F, and C HIV-1 using pairwise competitions in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) indicated a similarity in fitness of these BF recombinants to subtypes B and F HIV-1 (of the same co-receptor usage) whereas subtype C HIV-1 was significantly less fit than all as previously reported. These results suggest that the multitude of BF HIV-1 strains present within the Argentinean population do not appear to have gained replicative fitness following recent B and F recombination events.
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Membrane damage and repair in primary monocytes exposed to human ?-defensin-3.
J. Leukoc. Biol.
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Interactions of AMPs with plasma membranes of primary human immune cells are poorly characterized. Analysis of PI exclusion as a measure of membrane integrity indicated that hBD-3 caused membrane perturbations in monocytes but not T or B cells at concentrations typically used to kill bacteria or to induce activation of APCs. Bleb-like structures were observed in monocytes exposed to hBD-3. These cells also increased surface expression of LAMP1, a membrane repair marker after exposure to hBD-3. Furthermore, cell death was enhanced by adding an inhibitor of membrane repair. Removal of cholesterol from membranes resulted in greater susceptibility of cells to hBD-3, but cholesterol content was not different between the cell types, as assessed by filipin staining. Freshly isolated monocytes expressed higher levels of the negatively charged phospholipid, PS, on their outer leaflet compared with B or T cells. Preincubation of monocytes with molecules that bind PS protected these cells from hBD-3-induced membrane damage, suggesting that outer-membrane PS expression can at least partially explain monocyte susceptibility to hBD-3. The potential for membrane disruption caused by AMPs should be evaluated in various cell types when considering these molecules for therapeutic applications in humans.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.