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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Cell microenvironment: confinement and deformation of single cells and their nuclei inside size-adapted microtubes (adv. Healthcare mater. 11/2014).
Adv Healthc Mater
PUBLISHED: 11-11-2014
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Biofunctionalized glass microtube structures serve as transparent cell culture scaffolds and are fabricated to impose spatial confinement on single cells on page 1753. S. Sanchez, C. K. Schmidt, and colleagues demonstrate the influence of the resulting cell deformation on the integrity of the nucleus of human osteosarcoma cells and on cell division. Their findings underline the versatility of the rolled-up microtubes for mimicking space restrictions present in physiological tissues.
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Confinement and deformation of single cells and their nuclei inside size-adapted microtubes.
Adv Healthc Mater
PUBLISHED: 03-11-2014
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Rolled-up transparent microtubes are shown to serve as cell culture scaffolds that exactly define the space available for single cell growth. Human U2OS osteosarcoma cells are confined within microtubes of different diameters and the effects of the cell deformation on the integrity of the DNA and cell survival are studied.
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Thermal activation of catalytic microjets in blood samples using microfluidic chips.
Lab Chip
PUBLISHED: 10-04-2013
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We demonstrate that catalytic microjet engines can out-swim high complex media composed of red blood cells and serum. Despite the challenge presented by the high viscosity of the solution at room temperature, the catalytic microjets can be activated at physiological temperature and, consequently, self-propel in diluted solutions of blood samples. We prove that these microjets self-propel in 10× diluted blood samples using microfluidic chips.
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Orthoretroviral-like prototype foamy virus Gag-Pol expression is compatible with viral replication.
Retrovirology
PUBLISHED: 04-06-2011
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Foamy viruses (FVs) unlike orthoretroviruses express Pol as a separate precursor protein and not as a Gag-Pol fusion protein. A unique packaging strategy, involving recognition of briding viral RNA by both Pol precursor and Gag as well as potential Gag-Pol protein interactions, ensures Pol particle encapsidation.
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Analysis of prototype foamy virus particle-host cell interaction with autofluorescent retroviral particles.
Retrovirology
PUBLISHED: 02-02-2010
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The foamy virus (FV) replication cycle displays several unique features, which set them apart from orthoretroviruses. First, like other B/D type orthoretroviruses, FV capsids preassemble at the centrosome, but more similar to hepadnaviruses, FV budding is strictly dependent on cognate viral glycoprotein coexpression. Second, the unusually broad host range of FV is thought to be due to use of a very common entry receptor present on host cell plasma membranes, because all cell lines tested in vitro so far are permissive.
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Characterization and manipulation of foamy virus membrane interactions.
Cell. Microbiol.
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Foamy viruses (FVs), a unique type of retroviruses, are characterized by several unusual features in their replication strategy. FVs, common to all non-human primates and several other species, display an extremely broad tropism in vitro. Basically, all mammalian cells and species examined, but also cells of amphibian or bird origin, are permissive to FV glycoprotein (Env)-mediated capsid release into the cytoplasm. The nature of the broadly expressed, and potentially evolutionary conserved, FV entry receptor molecule(s) is poorly characterized. Although recent data indicate that proteoglycans serve as an important factor for FV Env-mediated target cell attachment, additional uncharacterized molecules appear to be essential for the pH-dependent fusion of viral and cellular lipid membranes after endocytic uptake of virions. Furthermore, FVs show a very special assembly strategy. Unlike other retroviruses, the FV capsid precursor protein (Gag) undergoes only very limited proteolytic processing during assembly. This results in an immature morphology of capsids found in released FV virions. In addition, the FV Gag protein appears to lack a functional membrane-targeting signal. As a consequence, FVs utilize a specific interaction between capsid and cognate viral glycoprotein for initiation of thebudding process. Genetic fusion of heterologous targeting domains for plasma but not endosomal membranes to FV Gag enables glycoprotein-independent particle egress. However, this is at the expense of normal capsid morphogenesis and infectivity. The low-level Gag precursor processing and the requirement for a reversible, artificial Gag membrane association for effective pseudotyping of FV capsids by heterologous glycoproteins strongly suggest that FVs require a transient interaction of capsids with cellular membranes for viral replication. Under natural condition, this appears to be achieved by the lack of a membrane-targeting function of the FV Gag protein and the accomplishment of capsid membrane attachment through an unusual specific interaction with the cognate glycoprotein.
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A small-molecule-controlled system for efficient pseudotyping of prototype foamy virus vectors.
Mol. Ther.
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Foamy virus (FV) vector systems have recently demonstrated their power as efficient gene transfer tools for different target tissues. Unfortunately, FVs cannot be naturally pseudotyped by heterologous viral glycoproteins due to an unusual particle morphogenesis involving a FV Env-dependent particle release process. Therefore, current FV vector systems are constrained to the broad host cell range provided by the cognate viral glycoprotein. We evaluated different approaches for pseudotyping of FV vectors, in which the specific FV Gag-Env interaction, essential for particle egress, is substituted by a small-molecule controlled heterodimerization (HD) system. In one system developed, one HD-domain (HDD) is fused to a membrane-targeting domain (MTD), such as the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) Gag matrix (MA) subunit, with a second fused to the FV capsid protein. Coexpression of both components with different heterologous viral glycoproteins allowed an efficient, dimerizer-dependent pseudotyping of FV capsids. With this system FV vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein (VSV-G) pseudotype titers greater than 1 × 10(6) IU/ml were obtained, at levels comparable to authentic FV vector particles. As a proof-of-principle we demonstrate that Pac2 cells, naturally resistant to FV vectors, become permissive to FV VSV-G pseudotypes. Similar to other retroviral vectors, this FV pseudotyping system now enables adaptation of cell-specific targeting approaches for FVs.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.