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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Impact of chronic graft-versus-host disease on late relapse and survival on 7489 patients after myeloablative allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation for leukemia.
Clin. Cancer Res.
PUBLISHED: 10-29-2014
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Purpose: Malignancy relapse remains a major obstacle for successful allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). Chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD) is associated with fewer relapses. However, when studying effects of cGVHD on relapse it is difficult to separate from acute GVHD effects as most cases of cGVHD occur within the first year post-transplant at the time when acute GVHD is still active. Experimental design: The current study based on CIBMTR registry data investigated cGVHD and its association with the incidence of late relapse and survival in 7489 patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML), acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) and myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) who were leukemia-free at12 months after myeloablative allogeneic HCT. Results: Forty-seven percent of the study population was diagnosed with cGVHD at 12 months after transplant. The protective effect of cGVHD on relapse was present only in patients with CML (RR: 0.47, 95% CI: 0.37-0.59, P <0.0001). cGVHD was significantly associated with higher risk of treatment related mortality, (RR: 2.43, 95% CI: 2.09-2.82, P <0.0001) and inferior overall survival (RR: 1.56, 95% CI: 1.41-1.73, P <0.0001) for all diseases. In patients with CML all organ sites and presentation types of cGVHD were equally associated with lower risk of late relapse. Conclusions: These results indicate that clinically relevant anti-leukemia effects of cGVHD on late relapses are present only in CML but not in AML, ALL or MDS. Chronic GVHD in patients who are one year survivors after myeloablative allogeneic HCT is primarily associated with higher TRM and inferior survival.
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Significant improvement in survival after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation during a period of significantly increased use, older recipient age, and use of unrelated donors.
J. Clin. Oncol.
PUBLISHED: 05-28-2013
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Over the past four decades, allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (alloHCT) has evolved as a curative modality for patients with hematologic diseases. This study describes changes in use, technique, and survival in a population-based cohort.
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Trends in use of and survival after autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation in North America, 1995-2005: significant improvement in survival for lymphoma and myeloma during a period of increasing recipient age.
Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
PUBLISHED: 03-29-2013
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Autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation (auto-HCT) is performed to treat relapsed and recurrent malignant disorders and as part of initial therapy for selected malignancies. This study evaluated changes in use, techniques, and survival in a population-based cohort of 68,404 patients who underwent first auto-HCT in a US or Canadian center between 1994 and 2005 and were reported to the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research (CIBMTR). The mean annual number of auto-HCTs performed was highest during 1996-1999 (6948), and decreased subsequently 2000-2003 (4783), owing mainly to fewer auto-HCTs done to treat breast cancer. However, the mean annual number of auto-HCTs increased from 5278 annually in 1994-1995 to 5459 annually in 2004-2005, reflecting increased use for multiple myeloma, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, and Hodgkin lymphoma. Despite an increase in the median recipient age from 44 to 53 years, there has been a significant improvement in overall survival (OS) from 1994 to 2005 in patients with chemotherapy-sensitive relapsed non-Hodgkin lymphoma (day +100 OS, from 85% to 96%; 1-year OS, from 68% to 80%; P < .001) and chemotherapy-sensitive multiple myeloma (day +100 OS, from 96% to 98%; 1-year OS, from 83% to 92%; P < .001). This improvement in OS was most pronounced in middle-aged (>40 years) and older (>60 years) individuals.
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Outcomes of allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation for adolescent and young adults compared with children and older adults with acute myeloid leukemia.
Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
PUBLISHED: 09-13-2011
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Adolescents and young adults (AYAs) with cancer have not experienced improvements in survival to the same extent as children and older adults. We compared outcomes among children (<15 years), AYAs (15-40 years) and older adults (>40 years) receiving allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) for acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Our cohort consisted of 900 children, 2,708 AYA, and 2,728 older adult recipients of HLA-identical sibling or unrelated donor (URD) transplantation using myeloablative or reduced-intensity/nonmyeloablative conditioning. Outcomes were assessed over three time periods (1980-1988, 1989-1997, 1998-2005) for siblings and two time periods (1989-1997, 1998-2005) for URD HCT. Analyses were stratified by donor type. Results showed overall survival for AYAs using either siblings or URD improved over time. Although children had better and older adults had worse survival compared with AYAs, improvements in survival for AYAs did not lag behind those for children and older adults. After sibling donor HCT, 5-year adjusted survival for the three time periods was 40%, 48%, and 53% for children, 35%, 41%, and 42% for AYAs, and 22%, 30%, and 34% for older adults. Among URD HCT recipients, 5-year adjusted survival for the two time periods was 38% and 37% for children, 24% and 28% for AYAs, and 19% and 23% for older adults. Improvements in survival occurred because of a reduction in risk of treatment-related mortality. The risk of relapse did not change over time. Improvements in survival among AYAs undergoing allogeneic HCT for AML have paralleled those among children and older adults.
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Risk factors associated with increased nonrelapse mortality and with poor overall survival in children with chronic graft-versus-host disease.
Blood
PUBLISHED: 08-30-2011
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There is a paucity of information regarding the factors that affect nonrelapse mortality (NRM) and overall survival among children that develop chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD). We performed multivariate analyses using data from the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research to identify risk factors for NRM and survival in 1117 pediatric subjects with leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome, transplanted from related donors, unrelated donors (URD), or unrelated cord blood between 1995 and 2004. We identified 4 variables associated with higher NRM: HLA partially matched or mismatched URD, peripheral blood cell graft, Karnofsky/Lansky score < 80 at cGVHD diagnosis, and platelets < 100 × 10(9)/L at cGVHD diagnosis. Factors associated with significantly worse survival were: age > 10 years, transplantation from HLA partially matched or mismatched URD, advanced disease at transplantation, Karnofsky/Lansky < 80; and platelets < 100 × 10(9)/L. Cumulative incidence of discontinuation of systemic immune suppression at 1, 3, and 5 years after diagnosis of cGVHD were 22% (20%-25%), 34% (31%-37%), and 37% (34%-40%), respectively. This is the largest study elucidating variables affecting outcome after diagnosis of cGVHD in pediatric allograft recipients. These variables may be useful for risk stratification, development of future clinical trials, and family counseling in children with cGVHD.
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Chronic GVHD risk score: a Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research analysis.
Blood
PUBLISHED: 04-14-2011
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Several risk factors are associated with increased mortality in patients with chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD), but there is considerable variability in the reported factors. Therefore, we evaluated patient, transplantation, and cGVHD characteristics to develop a risk score in 5343 patients with cGVHD. Ten variables were identified as being significant in multivariate analysis of overall survival and nonrelapse mortality (NRM): age, prior acute GVHD, time from transplantation to cGVHD, donor type, disease status at transplantation, GVHD prophylaxis, gender mismatch, serum bilirubin, Karnofsky score, and platelet count. These 10 variables were used to build a cGVHD risk score, and 6 risk groups (RGs) were identified. The 5-year NRM was 5% (1%-9%) in RG1, 20% (19%-23%) in RG2, 33% (29%-37%) in RG3, 43% (40%-46%) in RG4, 63% (53%-74%) in RG5, and 72% (59%-85%) in RG6. The 5-year overall survival was highest at 91% (95% confidence interval [CI]:85%-97%) in RG1, followed by 67% (65%-69%) in RG2, 51% (46%-55%) in RG3, 40% (37%-43%) in RG4, 21% (12%-30%) in RG5, and 4% (0%-9%) in RG6 (all P < .01). This analysis demonstrates the usefulness of data from a large registry to develop risk-score categories for major transplantation outcomes. Validation of this cGVHD risk score is needed in a different population to ensure its broad applicability.
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Malignancies after hematopoietic cell transplantation for primary immune deficiencies: a report from the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research.
Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
PUBLISHED: 03-16-2011
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We describe the incidence of malignancy in patients with primary immunodeficiency disorders (PIDD) following hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). From the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research, 2266 PIDD patients who had undergone allogeneic HCT between 1968 and 2003 were identified. Patient, disease, and transplant factors for development of malignancy were examined and pathology reports for reported malignancies reviewed independently by a pathologist for confirmation. The incidence of malignancy was highest for Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (3.3%), with an overall incidence of 2.3% for PIDD. Post-HCT malignancy was confirmed for 52 of 63 reported cases. Forty-five of 52 patients developed posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLD) at a median of 3 months post-HCT. Of these, 26 had received T cell-depleted (TCD) bone marrow. Three patients who developed myelodysplastic syndrome had received TCD marrow and total body irradiation. Three patients developed a solid tumor. Patients with PIDD are at a relatively low risk of developing malignancies post-HCT compared with their historic risk of cancer. The most frequent malignancy or lymphoproliferative disorder was early-onset PTLD. As in other HCT recipients, TCD appears to correlate with PTLD development. Our results lend support to the hypothesis that immune reconstitution in PIDD following HCT leads to a decrease in cancer risk.
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Outcomes of hematologic malignancies after unrelated donor hematopoietic cell transplantation according to place of residence.
Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
PUBLISHED: 10-05-2009
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Studies suggest that patients who live in rural areas may have worse clinical outcomes compared with patients living in urban areas. We studied whether place of residence (rural versus urban) is associated with clinical outcomes of patients with leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) who received an unrelated donor hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). Patients residential ZIP code at the time of transplant was used to determine rural or urban designation based on the Rural Urban Commuting Codes. The study included 6140 patients reported to the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research (CIBMTR) from 121 U.S. HCT centers: 1179 (19%) came from rural areas, whereas 4961 (81%) came from urban areas. Rural and urban patients were similar in patient-, disease-, and transplant-related characteristics aside from household income and distance traveled to the HCT center. After adjusting for income and other significant patient, disease, and transplant-related variables, the risk of overall mortality between patients residing in rural and urban areas were not statistically significant (relative risk 1.01, 95% confidence intervals 0.93-1.10, P = .74). Similar outcomes were noted for treatment-related mortality (TRM), disease-free survival (DFS), and relapse. Patients income, derived from the U.S. Census and based on their residential ZIP code, was independently associated with outcomes. In summary, our study showed no differences in the clinical outcomes of patients from rural or urban areas after unrelated donor HCT.
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Race and outcomes of autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation for multiple myeloma.
Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
PUBLISHED: 09-11-2009
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Blacks are twice as likely to develop and die from multiple myeloma (MM), and are less likely to receive an autologous hematopoietic-cell transplant (AHCT) for MM compared to Whites. The influence of race on outcomes of AHCT for MM is not well described. We compared the probability of overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS), disease progression, and nonrelapse mortality (NRM) among Black (N=303) and White (N=1892) recipients of AHCT for MM, who were reported to the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research (CIBMTR) from 1995 to 2005. The Black cohort was more likely to be female, and had better Karnofsky performance scores, but lower hemoglobin and albumin levels at diagnosis. Black recipients were younger and more likely to be transplanted later in their disease course. Disease stage and treatment characteristics prior to AHCT were similar between the 2 groups. Black and White recipients had similar probabilities of 5-year OS (52% versus 47%, P=.19) and PFS (19% versus 21%, P=.64) as well as cumulative incidences of disease progression (72% versus 72%, P=.97) and NRM (9% versus 8%, P=.52). In multivariate analyses, race was not associated with any of these endpoints. Black recipients of AHCT for MM have similar outcomes compared to Whites, suggesting that the reasons underlying lower rates of AHCT in Blacks need to be studied further to ensure equal access to effective therapy.
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Race and socioeconomic status influence outcomes of unrelated donor hematopoietic cell transplantation.
Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
PUBLISHED: 05-20-2009
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Success of hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) can vary by race, but the impact of socioeconomic status (SES) is not known. To evaluate the role of race and SES, we studied 6207 unrelated-donor myeloablative (MA) HCT recipients transplanted between 1995 and 2004 for acute or chronic leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Patients were reported by transplant center to be White (n = 5253), African American (n = 368), Asian/Pacific-Islander (n = 141), or Hispanic (n = 445). Patient income was estimated from residential zip code at time of HCT. Cox regression analysis adjusting for other significant factors showed that African American (but not Asian or Hispanic) recipients had worse overall survival (OS) (relative-risk [RR] 1.47; 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.29-1.68, P < .001) compared to Whites. Treatment-related mortality (TRM) was higher in African Americans (RR 1.56; 95% CI 1.34-1.83, P < .001) and in Hispanics (RR 1.30; 95% CI 1.11-1.51, P = .001). Across all racial groups, patients with median incomes in the lowest quartile (<$34,700) had worse OS (RR 1.15; 95% CI 1.04-1.26, P = .005) and higher risks of TRM (RR 1.21; 1.07-1.36, P = .002). Inferior outcomes among African Americans are not fully explained by transplant-related factors or SES. Potential other mechanisms such as genetic polymorphisms that have an impact on drug metabolism or unmeasured comorbidities, socioeconomic factors, and health behaviors may be important. Low SES, regardless of race, has a negative impact on unrelated donor HCT outcomes.
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Long-term survival and late deaths after hematopoietic cell transplantation for primary immunodeficiency diseases and inborn errors of metabolism.
Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
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It is uncertain whether late mortality rates after hematopoietic cell transplantation for severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID), non-SCID primary immunodeficiency diseases (non-SCID PIDD), and inborn errors of metabolism (IEM) return to rates observed in the general population, matched for age, sex, and nationality. We studied patients with SCID (n = 201), non-SCID PIDD (n = 405), and IEM (n = 348) who survived for at least 2 years after transplantation with normal T cell function (SCID) or >95% donor chimerism (non-SCID PIDD and IEM). Importantly, mortality rate was significantly higher in these patients compared with the general population for several years after transplantation. The rate decreased toward the normal rate in patients with SCID and non-SCID PIDD beyond 6 years after transplantation, but not in patients with IEM. Active chronic graft-versus-host disease at 2 years was associated with increased risk of late mortality for all diseases (hazard ratio [HR], 1.87; P = .05). In addition, late mortality was higher in patients with non-SCID PIDD who received T cell-depleted grafts (HR 4.16; P = .007) and in patients with IEM who received unrelated donor grafts (HR, 2.72; P = .03) or mismatched related donor grafts (HR, 3.76; P = .01). The finding of higher mortality rates in these long-term survivors for many years after transplantation confirms the need for long-term surveillance.
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JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.