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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Placebo Cessation in Binge Eating Disorder: Effect on Anthropometric, Cardiovascular, and Metabolic Variables.
Eur Eat Disord Rev
PUBLISHED: 09-23-2014
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The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of cessation of binge eating in response to placebo treatment in binge eating disorder (BED) on anthropometric, cardiovascular, and metabolic variables.
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Placebo response in binge eating disorder: a pooled analysis of 10 clinical trials from one research group.
Eur Eat Disord Rev
PUBLISHED: 01-08-2014
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The aim of this study was to gain further understanding of placebo response in binge eating disorder.
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Zonisamide in the treatment of bulimia nervosa: an open-label, pilot, prospective study.
Int J Eat Disord
PUBLISHED: 05-15-2013
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To assess preliminarily the effectiveness of zonisamide in bulimia nervosa.
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Adjunctive Methylphenidate in the Treatment of Bulimia Nervosa Co-occurring with Bipolar Disorder and Substance Dependence.
Innov Clin Neurosci
PUBLISHED: 04-05-2013
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Bulimia nervosa is associated with bipolar disorder, substance dependence, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, and anxiety disorders. Few reports, however, have addressed the treatment of patients with all of these conditions. We describe a young woman with bulimia nervosa, bipolar I disorder, cocaine and alcohol dependence, attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, and panic disorder who achieved a sustained (>1 year) remission of her bulimia nervosa symptoms and significant improvement of her attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder symptoms with adjunctive methylphenidate after her bipolar, substance use, and panic disorders were successfully treated with hospitalization, intensive psychotherapy, quetiapine, and lamotrigine. Further research into the use of stimulants in bulimia nervosa, including in patients with complex comorbidity, is required.
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Naltrexone/Bupropion combination therapy in overweight or obese patients with major depressive disorder: results of a pilot study.
Prim Care Companion CNS Disord
PUBLISHED: 02-18-2013
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Objective: To evaluate the effect of 32-mg/d naltrexone sustained release and 360-mg/d bupropion sustained release (NB32) in overweight and obese patients with major depressive disorder (MDD). Method: Twenty-five female patients with a DSM-IV diagnosis of MDD, an Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology-Self-Report score > 26, and a body mass index ? 27 and ? 43 kg/m(2) received up to 24 weeks of open-label treatment with NB32 with dietary and behavioral counseling (data collection: March 2008-July 2009). The primary endpoint was change from baseline in the Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) total score at 12 weeks; secondary endpoints included MADRS total score at week 24, change in weight, and Clinical Global Impressions-Improvement scale responder status (CGI-I score ? 2) at weeks 12 and 24 (modified intent-to-treat [mITT]: patients with ? 1 postbaseline MADRS total score on study drug; N = 23). Results: MADRS scores showed significant reductions at weeks 12 and 24 (mITT-last observation carried forward [LOCF]: -13.1 ± 7.1 and -15.3 ± 8.1, respectively, P < .001 vs baseline for all). Mean ± SD weight loss was -4.0% ± 4.6% (mITT-LOCF) and -6.1% ± 4.7% (observed cases) at week 12 and -5.3% ± 6.5% (mITT-LOCF) and -9.2% ± 6.2% (observed cases) at week 24 (P < .001 vs baseline for all). By week 24, 95% of patients (mITT-LOCF) were responders (CGI-I score ? 2) and 70% were in remission (CGI-I score = 1). The safety/tolerability profile of NB32 was consistent with its individual components; the most common adverse events were nausea, constipation, headache, and insomnia, with no serious adverse events attributed to NB32. Conclusion: Twenty-four weeks of open-label NB32 therapy with dietary and behavioral counseling was associated with improvement in depressive symptoms and reduced body weight in overweight/obese women with MDD. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00624858.
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A placebo-controlled pilot study of the novel opioid receptor antagonist ALKS-33 in binge eating disorder.
Int J Eat Disord
PUBLISHED: 02-05-2013
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To assess preliminarily the effectiveness of a novel opioid antagonist, ALKS-33, in binge eating disorder (BED).
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Bulimia nervosa presenting as rectal purging and rectal prolapse: case report and literature review.
Int J Eat Disord
PUBLISHED: 07-28-2011
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Rectal prolapse, but not rectal purging (excessive finger evacuation to induce defecation), has been formally associated with eating disorders in the medical literature. We describe a young woman with bulimia nervosa and irritable bowel syndrome who used rectal purging as a method of counteracting the effects of her binge eating and who underwent two corrective surgeries for rectal prolapse in a 15-month interval. Further research into the relationship between eating disorders, rectal purging, and gastrointestinal dysfunction is called for.
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Duloxetine in the treatment of binge eating disorder with depressive disorders: a placebo-controlled trial.
Int J Eat Disord
PUBLISHED: 05-14-2011
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This study evaluated duloxetine in the treatment of binge eating disorder (BED) with comorbid current depressive disorders.
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Acamprosate in the treatment of binge eating disorder: a placebo-controlled trial.
Int J Eat Disord
PUBLISHED: 03-12-2011
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To assess preliminarily the effectiveness of acamprosate in binge eating disorder (BED).
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Therapeutic potential of new second generation antipsychotics for major depressive disorder.
Expert Opin Investig Drugs
PUBLISHED: 11-26-2010
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Although a range of antidepressant medications are available, a substantial number of patients either do not respond adequately to these or are unable to tolerate their adverse effects. A treatment strategy that has gathered substantial empirical support is the use of second generation antipsychotic agents (SGAs) in combination with antidepressants for treatment-resistant nonpsychotic depression (TRD) or major depressive disorder (MDD) inadequately responsive to antidepressants. Aripiprazole, olanzapine and quetiapine each have indications that involve MDD. Growing evidence indicates that quetiapine, evaluated as the extended release formulation, is efficacious as monotherapy for nonpsychotic MDD.
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Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study of divalproex extended release loading monotherapy in ambulatory bipolar spectrum disorder patients with moderate-to-severe hypomania or mild mania.
J Clin Psychiatry
PUBLISHED: 02-23-2010
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To determine whether divalproex extended release (ER) would be effective in outpatients with DSM-IV-TR-diagnosed ambulatory bipolar spectrum disorder (BSD) and moderate-to-severe hypomanic or mild manic symptoms (hypomania/mild mania).
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Binge eating disorder pharmacotherapy clinical trails--who is left out?
Eur Eat Disord Rev
PUBLISHED: 06-18-2009
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This report examined the characteristics of subjects interested in binge eating disorder (BED) pharmacotherapy trails who were ineligible for participation.
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Lamotrigine in the treatment of binge-eating disorder with obesity: a randomized, placebo-controlled monotherapy trial.
Int Clin Psychopharmacol
PUBLISHED: 04-10-2009
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This study evaluated the efficacy and safety of lamotrigine in binge-eating disorder (BED) associated with obesity. Fifty-one outpatients with BED by Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, fourth edition criteria, and obesity were randomized to receive either lamotrigine (N=26) or placebo (N=25) in a 16-week, double-blind, flexible-dose study. Lamotrigine (236+/-150 mg/day) and placebo had similar rates of reduction of weekly frequency of binge-eating episodes and binge days, weight and BMI, measures of eating pathology, obsessive-compulsive symptoms, impulsivity, and global severity of illness. However, lamotrigine was associated with a numerically greater amount of weight loss (1.17 vs. 0.15 kg) and significant reductions in fasting levels of glucose, insulin, and triglycerides. It was also well tolerated and associated with no serious adverse events. As a result of an exceptionally high placebo response, it is likely that for efficacy measures except for body weight and metabolic indices, the study was incapable of detecting potentially clinically important drug-placebo difference.
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Role of antiepileptic drugs in the management of eating disorders.
CNS Drugs
PUBLISHED: 01-29-2009
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Growing evidence suggests that antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) may be useful in managing some eating disorders. In the present paper, we provide a brief overview of eating disorders, the rationale for using AEDs in the treatment of these disorders and review the data supporting the effectiveness of specific AEDs in the treatment of patients with eating disorders. In addition, the potential mechanisms of action of AEDs in these conditions are discussed. Of the available AEDs, topiramate appears to have the broadest spectrum of action as an anti-binge eating, anti-purging and weight loss agent, as demonstrated in two placebo-controlled studies in bulimia nervosa and three placebo-controlled studies in binge-eating disorder (BED) with obesity. Topiramate may also have beneficial effects in night-eating syndrome and sleep-related eating disorder, but controlled trials in these conditions are needed. The results of one small controlled study suggest that zonisamide may have efficacy in BED with obesity. However, both topiramate and zonisamide are associated with adverse effect profiles that may limit their use in patients with eating disorders. Phenytoin may be effective in some patients with compulsive binge eating, particularly if co-morbid EEG abnormalities are present, but available data are too varied to allow definitive conclusions to be made. Carbamazepine and valproate may be effective in treating patients with bulimia nervosa or anorexia nervosa when they are used to treat an associated psychiatric (e.g. mood) or neurological (e.g. seizure) disorder; otherwise, both agents, particularly valproate, are associated with weight gain. In conclusion, AEDs have an emerging role in the management of some eating disorders.
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N-acetylcysteine in bulimia nervosa--open-label trial.
Eat Behav
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The objective of this 12-week open-label flexible-dose study was to preliminarily assess the effectiveness of N-acetylcysteine (NAC) in bulimia nervosa (BN). The primary outcome was binge-purge episode frequency. Eight individuals with BN by DSM-IV criteria received NAC, but only two completed the study. NAC was not associated with significant reductions in frequency of binge-purge episodes or measures of clinical severity, eating, or mood pathology. In this trial, NAC was ineffective in BN and was associated with a high discontinuation rate.
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Current pharmacotherapy options for bulimia nervosa and binge eating disorder.
Expert Opin Pharmacother
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Growing evidence indicates binge eating, defined as the consumption of an abnormally large amount of food accompanied by a sense of loss of control, is an important public health problem. Although psychotherapy may be effective, not all patients respond adequately.
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Pharmacological management of binge eating disorder: current and emerging treatment options.
Ther Clin Risk Manag
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Growing evidence suggests that pharmacotherapy may be beneficial for some patients with binge eating disorder (BED), an eating disorder characterized by repetitive episodes of uncontrollable consumption of abnormally large amounts of food without inappropriate weight loss behaviors. In this paper, we provide a brief overview of BED and review the rationales and data supporting the effectiveness of specific medications or medication classes in treating patients with BED. We conclude by summarizing these data, discussing the role of pharmacotherapy in the BED treatment armamentarium, and suggesting future areas for research.
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Binge eating disorder in elderly individuals.
Int J Eat Disord
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To preliminarily describe the clinical features of elderly individuals with binge eating disorder (BED).
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A randomized, placebo-controlled study of zonisamide to prevent olanzapine-associated weight gain.
J Clin Psychopharmacol
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Weight gain is commonly observed with olanzapine treatment. Zonisamide is an antiepileptic drug associated with weight loss. This study examined the effectiveness of zonisamide in preventing weight gain in 42 patients beginning olanzapine for bipolar disorder or schizophrenia. Each patient had a body mass index of 22 mg/kg or greater and was randomized to taking olanzapine with either zonisamide (n = 20) or placebo (n = 22) for 16 weeks. The primary outcome measure was change in body weight in kilograms from baseline. In the primary analysis using longitudinal regression, patients who received zonisamide had a significantly slower rate of weight gain and increase in body mass index than those who received placebo. The patients treated with zonisamide gained a mean (SD) of 0.9 (3.3) kg, whereas those treated with placebo gained a mean (SD) of 5.0 (5.5) kg; P = 0.01. None of the patients in the zonisamide group, compared with 7 patients (33%) in the placebo group, gained 7% of body weight or greater from baseline (Fisher exact test, P = 0.009). The zonisamide group, however, reported significantly more cognitive impairment as an adverse event than the placebo group (25% vs 0, respectively; P = 0.02). Zonisamide was effective for mitigating weight gain in patients with bipolar disorder or schizophrenia initiating treatment with olanzapine but was associated with cognitive impairment as an adverse event.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.