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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Genetic services and testing in the Sultanate of Oman. Sultanate of Oman steps into modern genetics.
J Community Genet
PUBLISHED: 04-15-2013
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The Sultanate of Oman is a rapidly developing Muslim country with well-organised government-funded health care services, including primary, secondary and tertiary, and rapidly expanding medical genetic facilities. At the present time, the Omani population is characterised by a rapid rate of growth, large family size, consanguineous marriages, and the presence of genetic isolates. The preservation of a tribal structure in the community coupled with traditional isolation has produced unique and favourable circumstances for building genealogical records and the study of genetic disease. Genetic services developed in the Sultanate of Oman in the past decade have become an important component of health care. The recently constructed Genetic Centre in Muscat expects to meet the needs of the Omani population in provision of genetic services and research, in a manner deferential to the cultural and religious traditions of the country.
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Mutations in DDX59 implicate RNA helicase in the pathogenesis of orofaciodigital syndrome.
Am. J. Hum. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 03-27-2013
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Orofaciodigital syndrome (OFD) is a recognized clinical entity with core defining features in the mouth, face, and digits, in addition to various other features that have been proposed to define distinct subtypes. The three genes linked to OFD-OFD1, TMEM216, and TCTN3-play a role in ciliary biology, a finding consistent with the clinical overlap between OFD and other ciliopathies. Most autosomal-recessive cases of OFD, however, remain undefined genetically. In two multiplex consanguineous Arab families affected by OFD, we identified a tight linkage interval in chromosomal region 1q32.1. Exome sequencing revealed a different homozygous variant in DDX59 in each of the two families, and at least one of the two variants was accompanied by marked reduction in the level of DDX59. DDX59 encodes a relatively uncharacterized member of the DEAD-box-containing RNA helicase family of proteins, which are known to play a critical role in all aspects of RNA metabolism. We show that Ddx59 is highly enriched in its expression in the developing murine palate and limb buds. At the cellular level, we show that DDX59 is localized dynamically to the nucleus and the cytoplasm. Consistent with the absence of DDX59 representation in ciliome databases and our demonstration of its lack of ciliary localization, ciliogenesis appears to be intact in mutant fibroblasts but ciliary signaling appears to be impaired. Our data strongly implicate this RNA helicase family member in the pathogenesis of OFD, although the causal mechanism remains unclear.
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Severe neuronopathic autosomal recessive osteopetrosis due to homozygous deletions affecting OSTM1.
Bone
PUBLISHED: 03-18-2013
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Autosomal recessive osteopetrosis (ARO, MIM 259700) is a genetically heterogeneous rare skeletal disorder characterized by failure of osteoclast resorption leading to pathologically increased bone density, bone marrow failure, and fractures. In the neuronopathic form neurological complications are especially severe and progressive. An early identification of the underlying genetic defect is imperative for assessment of prognosis and treatment by hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Here we describe for the first time homozygous microdeletions of different sizes affecting the OSTM1 gene in two unrelated consanguineous families with children suffering from neuronopathic infantile malignant osteopetrosis. Patients showed an exceptionally severe phenotype with variable CNS malformations, seizures, blindness, and deafness. Multi-organ failure due to sepsis led to early death between six weeks and five months of age in spite of intensive care treatment. Analysis of the breakpoints revealed different mechanisms underlying both rearrangements. Microdeletions seem to represent a considerable portion of OSTM1 mutations and should therefore be included in a sufficient diagnostic screening.
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Duplications of BHLHA9 are associated with ectrodactyly and tibia hemimelia inherited in non-Mendelian fashion.
J. Med. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 12-06-2011
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Split-hand/foot malformation (SHFM)-also known as ectrodactyly-is a congenital disorder characterised by severe malformations of the distal limbs affecting the central rays of hands and/or feet. A distinct entity termed SHFLD presents with SHFM and long bone deficiency. Mouse models suggest that a defect of the central apical ectodermal ridge leads to the phenotype. Although six different loci/mutations (SHFM1-6) have been associated with SHFM, the underlying cause in a large number of cases is still unresolved.
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Identification of a novel candidate gene for non-syndromic autosomal recessive intellectual disability: the WASH complex member SWIP.
Hum. Mol. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 04-15-2011
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High-throughput sequencing has greatly facilitated the elucidation of genetic disorders, but compared with X-linked and autosomal dominant diseases, the search for genetic defects underlying autosomal recessive diseases still lags behind. In a large consanguineous family with autosomal recessive intellectual disability (ARID), we have combined homozygosity mapping, targeted exon enrichment and high-throughput sequencing to identify the underlying gene defect. After appropriate single-nucleotide polymorphism filtering, only two molecular changes remained, including a non-synonymous sequence change in the SWIP [Strumpellin and WASH (Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein and scar homolog)-interacting protein] gene, a member of the recently discovered WASH complex, which is involved in actin polymerization and multiple endosomal transport processes. Based on high pathogenicity and evolutionary conservation scores as well as functional considerations, this gene defect was considered as causative for ID in this family. In line with this assumption, we could show that this mutation leads to significantly reduced SWIP levels and to destabilization of the entire WASH complex. Thus, our findings suggest that SWIP is a novel gene for ARID.
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Deep sequencing reveals 50 novel genes for recessive cognitive disorders.
Nature
PUBLISHED: 03-09-2011
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Common diseases are often complex because they are genetically heterogeneous, with many different genetic defects giving rise to clinically indistinguishable phenotypes. This has been amply documented for early-onset cognitive impairment, or intellectual disability, one of the most complex disorders known and a very important health care problem worldwide. More than 90 different gene defects have been identified for X-chromosome-linked intellectual disability alone, but research into the more frequent autosomal forms of intellectual disability is still in its infancy. To expedite the molecular elucidation of autosomal-recessive intellectual disability, we have now performed homozygosity mapping, exon enrichment and next-generation sequencing in 136 consanguineous families with autosomal-recessive intellectual disability from Iran and elsewhere. This study, the largest published so far, has revealed additional mutations in 23 genes previously implicated in intellectual disability or related neurological disorders, as well as single, probably disease-causing variants in 50 novel candidate genes. Proteins encoded by several of these genes interact directly with products of known intellectual disability genes, and many are involved in fundamental cellular processes such as transcription and translation, cell-cycle control, energy metabolism and fatty-acid synthesis, which seem to be pivotal for normal brain development and function.
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Autosomal recessive mental retardation: homozygosity mapping identifies 27 single linkage intervals, at least 14 novel loci and several mutation hotspots.
Hum. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 08-18-2010
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Mental retardation (MR) has a worldwide prevalence of around 2% and is a frequent cause of severe disability. Significant excess of MR in the progeny of consanguineous matings as well as functional considerations suggest that autosomal recessive forms of MR (ARMR) must be relatively common. To shed more light on the causes of autosomal recessive MR (ARMR), we have set out in 2003 to perform systematic clinical studies and autozygosity mapping in large consanguineous Iranian families with non-syndromic ARMR (NS-ARMR). As previously reported (Najmabadi et al. in Hum Genet 121:43-48, 2007), this led us to the identification of 12 novel ARMR loci, 8 of which had a significant LOD score (OMIM: MRT5-12). In the meantime, we and others have found causative gene defects in two of these intervals. Moreover, as reported here, tripling the size of our cohort has enabled us to identify 27 additional unrelated families with NS-ARMR and single-linkage intervals; 14 of these define novel loci for non-syndromic ARMR. Altogether, 13 out of 39 single linkage intervals observed in our cohort were found to cluster at 6 different loci on chromosomes, i.e., 1p34, 4q27, 5p15, 9q34, 11p11-q13 and 19q13, respectively. Five of these clusters consist of two significantly overlapping linkage intervals, and on chr 1p34, three single linkage intervals coincide, including the previously described MRT12 locus. The probability for this distribution to be due to chance is only 1.14 × 10(-5), as shown by Monte Carlo simulation. Thus, in contrast to our previous conclusions, these novel data indicate that common molecular causes of NS-ARMR do exist, and in the Iranian population, the most frequent ones may well account for several percent of the patients. These findings will be instrumental in the identification of the underlying genes.
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Developmental and degenerative features in a complicated spastic paraplegia.
Ann. Neurol.
PUBLISHED: 05-04-2010
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We sought to explore the genetic and molecular causes of Troyer syndrome, one of several complicated hereditary spastic paraplegias (HSPs). Troyer syndrome had been thought to be restricted to the Amish; however, we identified 2 Omani families with HSP, short stature, dysarthria and developmental delay-core features of Troyer syndrome-and a novel mutation in the SPG20 gene, which is also mutated in the Amish. In addition, we analyzed SPG20 expression throughout development to infer how disruption of this gene might generate the constellation of developmental and degenerative Troyer syndrome phenotypes.
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Extended molecular spectrum of beta- and alpha-thalassemia in Oman.
Hemoglobin
PUBLISHED: 04-01-2010
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Sickle cell disease is known to be very common in the Omani population, although data are limited concerning beta-thalassemia (beta-thal). We report the molecular background of 87 unrelated patients from the Sultanate of Oman, diagnosed with beta-thal major (beta-TM), beta-thal intermedia (beta-TI) or minor. Diagnosis was based on clinical and hematological data and confirmed by molecular analysis. We found 11 different beta-thal determinants in our cohort, which consists of subjects from different regions of Oman. Six of these mutations have not been previously reported in the Omani population. The prevalence of alpha-thal single gene deletions (-alpha(3.7) and -alpha(4.2)) in the same cohort was very high (58.3%). These data will contribute to the implementation of a country-wide service for early molecular detection of hemoglobinopathies and for providing genetic counseling following premarital screening.
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Fatal cardiac arrhythmia and long-QT syndrome in a new form of congenital generalized lipodystrophy with muscle rippling (CGL4) due to PTRF-CAVIN mutations.
PLoS Genet.
PUBLISHED: 02-05-2010
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We investigated eight families with a novel subtype of congenital generalized lipodystrophy (CGL4) of whom five members had died from sudden cardiac death during their teenage years. ECG studies revealed features of long-QT syndrome, bradycardia, as well as supraventricular and ventricular tachycardias. Further symptoms comprised myopathy with muscle rippling, skeletal as well as smooth-muscle hypertrophy, leading to impaired gastrointestinal motility and hypertrophic pyloric stenosis in some children. Additionally, we found impaired bone formation with osteopenia, osteoporosis, and atlanto-axial instability. Homozygosity mapping located the gene within 2 Mbp on chromosome 17. Prioritization of 74 candidate genes with GeneDistiller for high expression in muscle and adipocytes suggested PTRF-CAVIN (Polymerase I and transcript release factor/Cavin) as the most probable candidate leading to the detection of homozygous mutations (c.160delG, c.362dupT). PTRF-CAVIN is essential for caveolae biogenesis. These cholesterol-rich plasmalemmal vesicles are involved in signal-transduction and vesicular trafficking and reside primarily on adipocytes, myocytes, and osteoblasts. Absence of PTRF-CAVIN did not influence abundance of its binding partner caveolin-1 and caveolin-3. In patient fibroblasts, however, caveolin-1 failed to localize toward the cell surface and electron microscopy revealed reduction of caveolae to less than 3%. Transfection of full-length PTRF-CAVIN reestablished the presence of caveolae. The loss of caveolae was confirmed by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) in combination with fluorescent imaging. PTRF-CAVIN deficiency thus presents the phenotypic spectrum caused by a quintessential lack of functional caveolae.
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Dosage effect of zero to three functional LBR-genes in vivo and in vitro.
Nucleus
PUBLISHED: 01-03-2010
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The Lamin B receptor (LBR) is a pivotal architectural protein in the nuclear envelope. Mutations in the Lamin B receptor lead to nuclear hyposegmentation (Pelger-Huët anomaly). We have exactly quantified the nuclear lobulation in neutrophils from individuals with 0, 1, 2 and 3 functional copies of the lamin B receptor gene and analyzed the effect of different mutation types. Our data demonstrate that there is a highly significant gene-dosage effect between the gene copy number and the nuclear segmentation index of neutrophils. This finding is paralleled by a dose-dependent increase in LBR protein and staining intensity of the nuclear membrane in corresponding lymphoblastoid cell lines, which demonstrates a significant correlation on the protein level as well. We further show that LBR expression continually increases during granulopoiesis in vitro from human precursor cells with ovoid nuclei to multi-segmented neutrophil nuclei 11 days later, indicating relevance for regular human granulopoiesis. Altogether, LBR is a unique model that will allow the systematic study of gene-dosage effects and of modifying endogeneous and exogeneous factors on granulopoiesis.
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High-throughput sequencing of microdissected chromosomal regions.
Eur. J. Hum. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 11-04-2009
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The linkage of disease gene mapping with DNA sequencing is an essential strategy for defining the genetic basis of a disease. New massively parallel sequencing procedures will greatly facilitate this process, although enrichment for the target region before sequencing remains necessary. For this step, various DNA capture approaches have been described that rely on sequence-defined probe sets. To avoid making assumptions on the sequences present in the targeted region, we accessed specific cytogenetic regions in preparation for next-generation sequencing. We directly microdissected the target region in metaphase chromosomes, amplified it by degenerate oligonucleotide-primed PCR, and obtained sufficient material of high quality for high-throughput sequencing. Sequence reads could be obtained from as few as six chromosomal fragments. The power of cytogenetic enrichment followed by next-generation sequencing is that it does not depend on earlier knowledge of sequences in the region being studied. Accordingly, this method is uniquely suited for situations in which the sequence of a reference region of the genome is not available, including population-specific or tumor rearrangements, as well as previously unsequenced genomic regions such as centromeres.
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A gradient of ROR2 protein stability and membrane localization confers brachydactyly type B or Robinow syndrome phenotypes.
Hum. Mol. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 07-29-2009
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Mutations in ROR2 cause dominant brachydactyly type B (BDB1) or recessive Robinow syndrome (RRS), each characterized by a distinct combination of phenotypic features. We here report a novel nonsense mutation in ROR2 (c.1324C>T; p.R441X) causing intracellular protein truncation in a patient exhibiting features of RRS in conjunction with severe recessive brachydactyly. The mutation is located at the same position as a previously described frame shift mutation causing dominant BDB1. To investigate the apparent discrepancy in phenotypic outcome, we analysed ROR2 protein stability and distribution in stably transfected cell lines expressing exact copies of several human RRS and BDB1 intracellular mutations. RRS mutant proteins were less abundant and retained intracellularly, although BDB1 mutants were stable and predominantly located at the cell membrane. The p.R441X mutation showed an intermediate pattern with membrane localization but also high endoplasmic reticulum retention. Furthermore, we observed a correlation between the severity of BDB1, the location of the mutation, and the amount of membrane-associated ROR2. Membrane protein fraction quantification revealed a gradient of distribution and stability correlating with the clinical phenotypes. This gradual model was confirmed by crossing mouse models for RRS and BDB1, yielding double heterozygous animals that exhibited an intermediate phenotype. We propose a model in which the RRS versus the BDB1 phenotype is determined by the relative degree of protein retention/degradation and the amount of mutant protein reaching the plasma membrane.
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Mutations in PYCR1 cause cutis laxa with progeroid features.
Nat. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 04-15-2009
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Autosomal recessive cutis laxa (ARCL) describes a group of syndromal disorders that are often associated with a progeroid appearance, lax and wrinkled skin, osteopenia and mental retardation. Homozygosity mapping in several kindreds with ARCL identified a candidate region on chromosome 17q25. By high-throughput sequencing of the entire candidate region, we detected disease-causing mutations in the gene PYCR1. We found that the gene product, an enzyme involved in proline metabolism, localizes to mitochondria. Altered mitochondrial morphology, membrane potential and increased apoptosis rate upon oxidative stress were evident in fibroblasts from affected individuals. Knockdown of the orthologous genes in Xenopus and zebrafish led to epidermal hypoplasia and blistering that was accompanied by a massive increase of apoptosis. Our findings link mutations in PYCR1 to altered mitochondrial function and progeroid changes in connective tissues.
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Cytogenetic studies in couples with recurrent miscarriage in the Sultanate of Oman.
Reprod. Biomed. Online
PUBLISHED: 03-21-2009
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Miscarriage, defined as spontaneous pregnancy loss at <20-28 weeks gestation, is a common clinical problem. Balanced chromosomal rearrangements in either parent are an important cause of repeated pregnancy loss, particularly in the first trimester. In this study, chromosomal abnormalities that cause recurrent miscarriage were evaluated in Omani parents and some of their dysmorphic children. A total of 380 couples (760 individuals) with two or more recurrent miscarriages were examined for chromosomal aberrations during the period 1999-2006. For each proband the chromosomal preparations were analysed and karyotyped after applying a Giemsa-trypsin banding method. The overall incidence of chromosomal anomaly was 26 out of 760 individuals (3.42%). These abnormalities included 21 (2.8%) structural aberrations and 5 (0.7%) numerical anomalies. In addition to these abnormalities, 39 (5.1%) chromosomal variants were also found. The nature of these abnormalities and their relation to obstetric history are discussed. In conclusion, chromosomal abnormality is one of the causes of recurrent miscarriage. This study illustrates the incidence and distribution of chromosomal abnormalities among Omani couples with recurrent miscarriage. Cytogenetic findings could provide valuable information for genetic counselling and allow monitoring of future pregnancies by prenatal diagnosis in couples with a history of recurrent miscarriage.
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A large-scale mutation search reveals genetic heterogeneity in 3M syndrome.
Eur. J. Hum. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 02-20-2009
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The 3M syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disorder recently ascribed to mutations in the CUL7 gene and characterized by severe pre- and postnatal growth retardation. Studying a series of 33 novel cases of 3M syndrome, we have identified deleterious CUL7 mutations in 23/33 patients, including 19 novel mutations and one paternal isodisomy of chromosome 6 encompassing a CUL7 mutation. Lack of mutations in 10/33 cases and exclusion of the CUL7 locus on chromosome 6p21.1 in six consanguineous families strongly support the genetic heterogeneity of the 3M syndrome.
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Recessive developmental delay, small stature, microcephaly and brain calcifications with locus on chromosome 2.
Am. J. Med. Genet. A
PUBLISHED: 01-24-2009
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Two interrelated Omani families are described with eight children manifesting a genetic disorder with widespread brain calcifications. Brain imaging showed extensive scattered calcifications of basal ganglia and cortex, suggesting possible Aicardi-Goutieres syndrome (AGS) or Coats Plus syndrome. However, the clinical features in the present families diverge substantially from these two conditions. Growth delay, mild developmental delay, and poor school performance were present in all affected individuals, but progressive deterioration of neurological function was not apparent, nor were there significant cortical whitematter disease or retinopathy. Genome-wide linkage and fine-mapping analyses of the extended family members and affected individuals indicate a genetic locus for this disorder on Chromosome 2 with a LOD score of 6.17. The Chromosome 2 locus is novel and the clinical presentation displays features distinguishing the condition from either Coats or AGS, making this a new variant or possibly a new disorder of inherited brain calcification.
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Evolutionarily assembled cis-regulatory module at a human ciliopathy locus.
Science
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Neighboring genes are often coordinately expressed within cis-regulatory modules, but evidence that nonparalogous genes share functions in mammals is lacking. Here, we report that mutation of either TMEM138 or TMEM216 causes a phenotypically indistinguishable human ciliopathy, Joubert syndrome. Despite a lack of sequence homology, the genes are aligned in a head-to-tail configuration and joined by chromosomal rearrangement at the amphibian-to-reptile evolutionary transition. Expression of the two genes is mediated by a conserved regulatory element in the noncoding intergenic region. Coordinated expression is important for their interdependent cellular role in vesicular transport to primary cilia. Hence, during vertebrate evolution of genes involved in ciliogenesis, nonparalogous genes were arranged to a functional gene cluster with shared regulatory elements.
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JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.