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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Engraftment kinetics and graft failure after single umbilical cord blood transplantation using a myeloablative conditioning regimen.
Haematologica
PUBLISHED: 06-27-2014
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Umbilical cord blood transplant recipients are exposed to an increased risk of graft failure, a complication leading to a higher rate of transplant-related mortality. The decision and timing to offer a second transplant after graft failure is challenging. With the aim of addressing this issue, we analyzed engraftment kinetics and outcomes of 1268 patients (73% children) with acute leukemia (64% acute lymphoblastic leukemia, 36% acute myeloid leukemia) in remission who underwent single-unit umbilical cord blood transplantation after a myeloablative conditioning regimen. The median follow-up was 31 months. The overall survival rate at 3 years was 47%; the 100-day cumulative incidence of transplant-related mortality was 16%. Longer time to engraftment was associated with increased transplant-related mortality and shorter overall survival. The cumulative incidence of neutrophil engraftment at day 60 was 86%, while the median time to achieve engraftment was 24 days. Probability density analysis showed that the likelihood of engraftment after umbilical cord blood transplantation increased after day 10, peaked on day 21 and slowly decreased to 21% by day 31. Beyond day 31, the probability of engraftment dropped rapidly, and the residual probability of engrafting after day 42 was 5%. Graft failure was reported in 166 patients, and 66 of them received a second graft (allogeneic, n=45). Rescue actions, such as the search for another graft, should be considered starting after day 21. A diagnosis of graft failure can be established in patients who have not achieved neutrophil recovery by day 42. Moreover, subsequent transplants should not be postponed after day 42.
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Unrelated cord blood transplantation for patients with primary or secondary myelofibrosis.
Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
PUBLISHED: 05-26-2014
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To determine whether umbilical cord blood transplantation (UCBT) is an alternative cure for myelofibrosis (MF), we evaluated 35 UCBTs reported to Eurocord. Seven patients had secondary acute myeloid leukemia (AML) at UCBT, and median age at UCBT was 54 years. Twenty-four patients received a reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) regimen, and 17 of 35 patients received total body irradiation (2 to 12 Gy)-fludarabine-cyclophosphamide (TCF) conditioning. The median follow-up was 24 months. The cumulative incidence of neutrophil recovery at 60 days was 80%. Fifteen patients relapsed after UCBT. The 2-year overall survival and event-free-survival (EFS) rates were 44% and 30%, respectively. All patients given TCF achieved neutrophil and platelet recovery, and the use of TCF was associated with superior EFS in the RIC population (44% versus 0%, P = .001). Patients with transformation to AML had similar outcomes to patients with less advanced stages. In conclusion, despite graft failure remaining a major concern, the role of UCBT in the management of MF, especially using RIC TCF-based regimens, deserves further investigation to improve results.
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Alternative donor transplantation for older patients with acute myeloid leukemia in first complete remission: a center for international blood and marrow transplant research-eurocord analysis.
Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
PUBLISHED: 01-23-2014
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We studied patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) over age 50 and in first complete remission (CR1) after adult unrelated donor (URD) (n = 441, 8/8 HLA matched; n = 94, 7/8 HLA matched) or umbilical cord blood (UCB; n = 205) transplantations. UCB recipients achieved CR1 within 8 weeks less often, and received reduced-intensity conditioning and cyclosporine-based graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) prophylaxis more often. Neutrophil recovery was slower in UCB (69% by day 28) compared with 8/8 HLA-matched URD (97%) and 7/8 HLA-matched (91%) (P < .001) recipients. Three-year transplantation-related mortality (TRM) was higher and leukemia-free survival (LFS) lower with UCB (35% and 28%, respectively) versus 8/8 HLA-matched URD (27% and 39%, respectively). TRM was higher in 7/8 HLA-matched URD (41%, P = .01), but LFS was similar at 34% (P = .39). Three-year chronic GVHD was the lowest in UCB (28%) versus 53% and 59% in 8/8 and 7/8 HLA-matched URD recipients, respectively. Three-year survival was 43% in 8/8 HLA-matched URD (95% confidence interval [CI], 38% to 48%), 30% in UCB (95% CI, 23% to 37%) (P = .002) and 37% in 7/8 URD (95% CI, 27 to 46). Allotransplantation for AML in CR1 with any of these grafts extends LFS for over one third of older patients. In the absence of an 8/8 HLA-matched URD or when transplantation is needed urgently, UCB can provide extended survival. Less frequent chronic GVHD with UCB transplantation may be of particular value for older patients.
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Impact of minimal residual disease on outcomes after umbilical cord blood transplantation for adults with Philadelphia-positive acute lymphoblastic leukaemia: an analysis on behalf of Eurocord, Cord Blood Committee and the Acute Leukaemia working party of the European g
Br. J. Haematol.
PUBLISHED: 01-19-2014
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The status of umbilical cord blood transplantation (UCBT) in adults with Philadelphia-positive acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (Ph+ALL) and the impact of minimal residual disease (MRD) before transplant are not well established. We analysed 98 patients receiving UCBT for Ph+ALL in first (CR1) or second (CR2) complete remission (CR1, n = 79; CR2, n = 19) with MRD available before UCBT (92% analysed by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction). Median age was 38 years and median follow-up was 36 months; 63% of patients received myeloablative conditioning and 42% received double-unit UCBT. Eighty-three patients were treated with at least one tyrosine kinase inhibitor before UCBT. MRD was negative (-) in 39 and positive (+) in 59 patients. Three-year cumulative incidence of relapse was 34%; 45% in MRD+ and 16% in MRD- patients (P =0·013). Three-year cumulative incidence of non-relapse mortality was 31%; it was increased in patients older than 35 years (P = 0·02). Leukaemia-free survival (LFS) at 3 years was 36%; 27% in MRD+ and 49% in MRD- patients (P = 0·05), and 41% for CR1 and 14% for CR2 (P = 0·008). Multivariate analysis identified only CR1 as being associated with improved LFS. In conclusion, MRD+ before UCBT is associated with increased relapse. Strategies to decrease relapse in UCBT recipients with Ph+ALL and MRD+ are needed.
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Cost-effectiveness and clinical outcomes of double versus single cord bloodtransplantation in adults with acute leukemia in France.
Haematologica
PUBLISHED: 10-18-2013
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Double cord blood transplantation extended the use of cord blood in adults for whom a single unit is not available, but it is limited due to its cost. To evaluate outcomes and cost-effectiveness of double compared to single cord blood transplantation, we analyzed 134 transplants in adults with acute leukemia in first remission. Transplants were performed in France with reduced or myeloablative conditioning regimens. Costs were estimated from donor search to 1-year after transplant. A Markov decision analysis model was used to calculate quality-adjusted-life-years and cost-effectiveness ratio within 4-years. Overall survival at 2 years was 42% versus 62% after single and double cord blood transplantation, (p=0.03); leukemia-free-survival was 33% for single and 53% for double (0.03). Relapse was 21% after double and 42% after single (p=0.006). No difference was observed for non-relapse-mortality and chronic-graft-versus-host-disease. Estimated cost within 1-year after reduced intensity conditioning, was 165.253 Euros and 191.827 Euros for single and double cord blood transplantation, respectively. After myeloablative conditioning it was 192.566 Euros for single and 213.050 Euros, for double cord blood transplantation. Compared to single, double cord blood transplantation was associated with a supplementary cost of 21.302 Euros and 32.420 Euros within 4 years, but with an improvement of quality-adjusted-life-year of 0.616 and 0.484, and an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of 34 581 Euros and 66 983 Euros in the myeloablative and reduced intensity settings, respectively. Our results showed that for adults with acute leukemia in CR1 in France, double is more cost-effective than single cord blood transplantation, with better outcomes, including quality-adjusted-life-year.
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Impact of allele-level HLA matching on outcomes after myeloablative single unit umbilical cord blood transplantation for hematologic malignancy.
Blood
PUBLISHED: 10-18-2013
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We studied the effect of allele-level matching at human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-A, -B, -C, and -DRB1 in 1568 single umbilical cord blood (UCB) transplantations for hematologic malignancy. The primary end point was nonrelapse mortality (NRM). Only 7% of units were allele matched at HLA-A, -B, -C, and -DRB1; 15% were mismatched at 1, 26% at 2, 30% at 3, 16% at 4, and 5% at 5 alleles. In a subset, allele-level HLA match was assigned using imputation; concordance between HLA-match assignment and outcome correlation was confirmed between the actual and imputed HLA-match groups. Compared with HLA-matched units, neutrophil recovery was lower with mismatches at 3, 4, or 5, but not 1 or 2 alleles. NRM was higher with units mismatched at 1, 2, 3, 4, or 5 alleles compared with HLA-matched units. The observed effects are independent of cell dose and patient age. These data support allele-level HLA matching in the selection of single UCB units.
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Alternative donor hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for mature lymphoid malignancies after reduced-intensity conditioning regimen: similar outcomes with umbilical cord blood and unrelated donor peripheral blood.
Haematologica
PUBLISHED: 08-09-2013
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We have reported encouraging results of unrelated cord blood transplantation for patients with lymphoid malignancies. Whether those outcomes are comparable to matched unrelated donor transplants remains to be defined. We studied 645 adult patients with mature lymphoid malignancies who received an allogeneic unrelated donor transplant using umbilical cord blood (n=104) or mobilized peripheral blood stem cells (n=541) after a reduced-intensity conditioning regimen. Unrelated cord blood recipients had more refractory disease. Median follow-up time was 30 months. Neutrophil engraftment (81% vs. 97%, respectively, p<0.0001) and chronic graft versus host disease (26% vs. 52%, P=0.0005) were less frequent after unrelated cord blood than after matched unrelated donor, whereas no differences were observed in grade II-IV acute graft versus host disease (29% vs. 32%), non-relapse mortality (29% vs. 28%), and relapse or progression (28% vs. 35%) at 36 months. There were also no significant differences in two-year progression-free survival (43% vs. 58%, respectively) and overall survival (36% vs. 51%) at 36 months. In a multivariate analysis, no differences were observed in the outcomes between the two stem cell sources except for a higher risk of neutrophil engraftment (hazard ratio = 2.12, p= p<0.0001) and chronic graft versus host disease (hazard ratio: 2.10, p=0.0002) after matched unrelated donor transplant. In conclusion, final outcomes after transplantation were not different between umbilical cord blood and matched unrelated donor transplant. Umbilical cord blood is a valuable alternative for patients with lymphoid malignancies lacking an HLA-matched donor, being associated with lower risk of chronic graft versus host disease.
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Analysis of risk factors influencing outcomes after cord blood transplantation in children with juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia: a EUROCORD, EBMT, EWOG-MDS, CIBMTR study.
Blood
PUBLISHED: 08-07-2013
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We retrospectively analyzed 110 patients with juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia, given single-unit, unrelated donor umbilical cord blood transplantation. Median age at diagnosis and at transplantation was 1.4 years (age range, 0.1-6.4 years) and 2.2 years (age range, 0.5-7.4 years), respectively. Before transplantation, 88 patients received chemotherapy; splenectomy was performed in 24 patients. Monosomy of chromosome 7 was the most frequent cytogenetic abnormality, found in 24% of patients. All but 8 patients received myeloablative conditioning; cyclosporine plus steroids was the most common graft-versus-host disease prophylaxis. Sixteen percent of units were HLA-matched with the recipient, whereas 43% and 35% had either 1 or 2 to 3 HLA disparities, respectively. The median number of nucleated cells infused was 7.1 × 10(7)/kg (range, 1.7-27.6 × 10(7)/kg). With a median follow-up of 64 months (range, 14-174 months), the 5-year cumulative incidences of transplantation-related mortality and relapse were 22% and 33%, respectively. The 5-year disease-free survival rate was 44%. In multivariate analysis, factors predicting better disease-free survival were age younger than 1.4 years at diagnosis (hazard ratio [HR], 0.42; P = .005), 0 to 1 HLA disparities in the donor/recipient pair (HR, 0.4; P = .009), and karyotype other than monosomy 7 (HR, 0.5; P = .02). Umbilical cord blood transplantation may cure a relevant proportion of children with juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia. Because disease recurrence remains the major cause of treatment failure, strategies to reduce incidence of relapse are warranted.
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Outcome of patients with hemoglobinopathies given either cord blood or bone marrow transplantation from an HLA-identical sibling.
Blood
PUBLISHED: 05-21-2013
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We analyzed the outcomes of 485 patients with thalassemia major (TM) or sickle cell disease (SCD) receiving HLA-identical sibling cord blood transplantation (CBT, n = 96) or bone marrow transplantation (BMT, n = 389). Compared with patients given BMT, CBT recipients were significantly younger (median age 6 vs 8 years, P = .02), and were treated more recently (median year 2001 vs 1999, P < .01). A higher proportion of patients with TM belonging to classes II-III of the Pesaro classification received BMT (44%) compared with CBT (39%, P < .01). In comparison with patients receiving BMT (n = 259, TM; n = 130, SCD), those given CBT (n = 66, TM; n = 30, SCD) had slower neutrophil recovery, less acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) and none had extensive chronic GVHD. With a median follow-up of 70 months, the 6-year overall survival was 95% and 97% after BMT and CBT, respectively (P = .92). The 6-year disease-free survival (DFS) was 86% and 80% in TM patients after BMT and CBT, respectively, whereas DFS in SCD patients was 92% and 90%, respectively. The cell dose infused did not influence outcome of patients given CBT. In multivariate analysis, DFS did not differ between CBT and BMT recipients. Patients with TM or SCD have excellent outcomes after both HLA-identical sibling CBT and BMT.
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Unrelated cord blood transplantation: outcomes after single-unit intrabone injection compared with double-unit intravenous injection in patients with hematological malignancies.
Transplantation
PUBLISHED: 03-20-2013
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Unrelated cord blood transplantation (UCBT) is associated with delayed hematopoietic recovery. Intrabone injection of cord blood cells (IB-UCBT) and double-UCBT (dUCBT) are designed to circumvent this problem.
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Outcomes of transplantation using various hematopoietic cell sources in children with Hurler syndrome after myeloablative conditioning.
Blood
PUBLISHED: 03-14-2013
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We report transplantation outcomes of 258 children with Hurler syndrome (HS) after a myeloablative conditioning regimen from 1995 to 2007. Median age at transplant was 16.7 months and median follow-up was 57 months. The cumulative incidence of neutrophil recovery at day 60 was 91%, acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) (grade II-IV) at day 100 was 25%, and chronic GVHD and 5 years was 16%. Overall survival and event-free survival (EFS) at 5 years were 74% and 63%, respectively. EFS after HLA-matched sibling donor (MSD) and 6/6 matched unrelated cord blood (CB) donor were similar at 81%, 66% after 10/10 HLA-matched unrelated donor (UD), and 68% after 5/6 matched CB donor. EFS was lower after transplantation in 4/6 matched unrelated CB (UCB) (57%; P = .031) and HLA-mismatched UD (41%; P = .007). Full-donor chimerism (P = .039) and normal enzyme levels (P = .007) were higher after CB transplantation (92% and 98%, respectively) compared with the other grafts sources (69% and 59%, respectively). In conclusion, results of allogeneic transplantation for HS are encouraging, with similar EFS rates after MSD, 6/6 matched UCB, 5/6 UCB, and 10/10 matched UD. The use of mismatched UD and 4/6 matched UCB was associated with lower EFS.
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Effect of donor-recipient HLA matching at HLA A, B, C, and DRB1 on outcomes after umbilical-cord blood transplantation for leukaemia and myelodysplastic syndrome: a retrospective analysis.
Lancet Oncol.
PUBLISHED: 10-06-2011
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The importance of matching at the HLA C locus has not been well defined for unrelated umbilical-cord blood transplantation. The selection algorithm for umbilical-cord blood units generally considers intermediate resolution HLA typing at A and B and allele-level typing at DRB1. We aimed to establish the relative importance of additional matching at HLA C.
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Family-directed umbilical cord blood banking.
Haematologica
PUBLISHED: 07-12-2011
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Umbilical cord blood transplantation from HLA-identical siblings provides good results in children. These results support targeted efforts to bank family cord blood units that can be used for a sibling diagnosed with a disease which can be cured by allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation or for research that investigates the use of allogeneic or autologous cord blood cells. Over 500 patients transplanted with related cord blood units have been reported to the Eurocord registry with a 4-year overall survival of 91% for patients with non-malignant diseases and 56% for patients with malignant diseases. Main hematologic indications in children are leukemia, hemoglobinopathies or inherited hematologic, immunological or metabolic disorders. However, family-directed cord blood banking is not widely promoted; many cord blood units used in sibling transplantation have been obtained from private banks that do not meet the necessary criteria required to store these units. Marketing by private banks who predominantly store autologous cord blood units has created public confusion. There are very few current validated indications for autologous storage but some new indications might appear in the future. Little effort is devoted to provide unbiased information and to educate the public as to the distinction between the different types of banking, economic models and standards involved in such programs. In order to provide a better service for families in need, directed-family cord blood banking activities should be encouraged and closely monitored with common standards, and better information on current and future indications should be made available.
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Milestones in umbilical cord blood transplantation.
Br. J. Haematol.
PUBLISHED: 07-05-2011
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Much has been learned about umbilical cord blood (UCB) since the first human cord blood transplant was performed back in 1988. Cord blood banks have been established worldwide for the collection, cryopreservation and distribution of UCB for allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation. UCB has now become one of the most commonly used sources of haematopoietic stem cells for allogeneic transplantation. Today, a global network of cord blood banks and transplant centres has been established with a large common inventory, allowing for more than 20000 transplants worldwide in children and adults with severe haematological diseases. Several studies have been published on UCB transplant, assessing risk factors such as cell dose and human leucocyte antigen mismatch. New strategies are ongoing to facilitate engraftment and reduce transplant-related mortality and include the use of reduced-intensity conditioning regimen, intra-bone injection of cord blood cells, double cord blood transplants or ex vivo expansion of cord blood cells. The absence of ethical concern and the unlimited supply of cells explain the increasing interest of using UCB for developing regenerative medicine.
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Umbilical cord blood transplantation for children with thalassemia and sickle cell disease.
Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
PUBLISHED: 01-16-2011
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We examined the efficacy of unrelated cord blood (CB) transplantation in children with thalassemia (n = 35) and sickle cell disease (n = 16), using data reported to 3 registries. Donor-recipient pairs were matched at HLA-A and -B (antigen level) and DRB1 (allele level) in 7 or HLA mismatched at 1 (n = 18), 2 (n = 25), or 3 loci (n = 1). Transplant conditioning was myeloablative (n = 39) or reduced intensity (n = 12). Neutrophil recovery with donor chimerism was documented in 24 patients; 11 patients developed grade II-IV acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD) and 10 patients, chronic GVHD (cGVHD). Overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) were 62% and 21% for thalassemia and 94% and 50% for sickle cell disease (SCD), respectively. In multivariate analysis, engraftment rate (hazard ratio [HR] 2.2, P = .05) and DFS (HR 0.4, P = .01) were higher with cell dose >5 × 10(7)/kg. The 2-year probability of DFS was 45% in patients who received grafts with cell dose >5 × 10(7)/kg and 13% with lower cell dose. Primary graft failure was the predominant cause of treatment failure occurring in 20 patients with thalassemia and 7 patients with SCD. Primary graft failure was fatal in 5 patients with thalassemia. These results suggest that only CB units containing an expected infused cell dose >5 × 10(7)/kg should be considered for transplantation for hemoglobinopathy.
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Is there an impact of killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors and KIR-ligand incompatibilities on outcomes after unrelated cord blood stem cell transplantation?
Best Pract Res Clin Haematol
PUBLISHED: 09-15-2010
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Donor killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR) ligand incompatibility in the graft-versus-host direction is associated with decreased relapse incidence and improved disease-free survival after haploidentical and human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-mismatched unrelated, haematopoietic stem cell transplantation. However, review of all published studies of allogeneic HLA-matched or mismatched stem cell transplantation shows that the results on the relationship between donor-recipient KIR(-ligand) (in)compatibility and outcomes are highly variable, ranging from highly beneficial to detrimental. Reasons for these differences may include the methodology to determine KIR(-ligand) incompatibility, the disease distribution and the transplant protocol or donor type. Two retrospective studies on the effects of KIR-ligand incompatibility in unrelated cord blood transplantation (UCBT) for haematological malignancies have resulted in conflicting results. The Eurocord study showed a favourable effect of KIR-ligand mismatching on relapse incidence and leukaemia-free survival, whereas the Minneapolis study showed no effect on these end points and a detrimental effect on incidence of graft-versus-host disease (GvHD). In patients with non-malignant disorders, KIR-ligand (in)compatibility between donor and recipient was not associated with outcomes in a recent Eurocord analysis. Therefore, the role of natural killer (NK) cell alloreactivity in UCBT is far from clear. It is too early to use a donor-recipient KIR(-ligand) algorithm for selection of a cord blood donor.
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Double cord blood transplantation: extending the use of unrelated umbilical cord blood cells for patients with hematological diseases.
Best Pract Res Clin Haematol
PUBLISHED: 09-15-2010
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Unrelated umbilical cord blood (UCB) has been widely used to treat patients lacking a well-matched HLA donor. Cell dose is a critical determinant of outcomes in cord blood transplantation, limiting the use of this strategy for low body weight patients. To overcome this limitation, infusion of two partially HLA-matched cord units was adopted as a new strategy. Since 2005, number of adult patients treated with UCB transplant is increased due to the higher number of cells available using two units and to the feasibility of reduced intensity conditioning regimen, extending successfully this strategy to heavier patients or for those with co-morbidities. Approximately 993 adults with hematological diseases have been transplanted with double UCB graft, and reported to Eurocord registry from 1999 to 2010. This article reviews the state of art and future directions with double umbilical cord blood units as a source of hematopoietic stem cells for transplantation.
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Alternative donors hematopoietic stem cells transplantation for adults with acute myeloid leukemia: Umbilical cord blood or haploidentical donors?
Best Pract Res Clin Haematol
PUBLISHED: 09-15-2010
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Use of allogeneic transplantation for patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) depends mainly on the risk of the disease, and HLA matched donor availability. In patients with high-risk leukemia, in the absence of a HLA (human leukocyte antigen) matched donor, alternative donors such as unrelated umbilical cord blood (UCB) or haploidentical donor (haplo) have been currently used. Both strategies have important advantages such as shorter time to transplant, which is particularly relevant to patients requiring urgent transplantation, and tolerance of HLA mismatched graft that make possible that a donor can be found for virtually all patients. However, in spite of higher incidence of graft failure in UCB transplatation recipients and higher relapse incidence after haplo transplants, final outcomes seem to be comparable with HLA matched unrelated hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (bone marrow or peripheral blood). Therefore, the complexity of choosing the best alternative donor will depend on urgency of the transplantation, status and risk of the disease, donor criteria and center experience. Here we review the current status of UCBT and haplo transplants to treat adults with high-risk acute myeloid leukemia and we discuss the main issues associated with the use of both hematopoietic stem cell transplant approaches.
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Effect of graft source on unrelated donor haemopoietic stem-cell transplantation in adults with acute leukaemia: a retrospective analysis.
Lancet Oncol.
PUBLISHED: 06-19-2010
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Umbilical-cord blood (UCB) is increasingly considered as an alternative to peripheral blood progenitor cells (PBPCs) or bone marrow, especially when an HLA-matched adult unrelated donor is not available. We aimed to determine the optimal role of UCB grafts in transplantation for adults with acute leukaemia, and to establish whether current graft-selection practices are appropriate.
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Influence of nucleated cell dose on overall survival of unrelated cord blood transplantation for patients with severe acquired aplastic anemia: a study by eurocord and the aplastic anemia working party of the European group for blood and marrow transplant
Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
PUBLISHED: 04-05-2010
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Information is scarce on outcomes after unrelated cord blood transplantation (UCBT) for patients with severe aplastic anemia (SAA). We retrospectively analyzed 71 patients (median age, 13 years; 28 adults) with SAA (9 with paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria [PNH]) who received a single-unit (n = 57; 79%) or double-unit UCBT (n = 14; 19%) in 32 centers between 1996 and 2009. A reduced-intensity conditioning regimen was provided in 68% of the patients. The cumulative incidence (CI) of neutrophil recovery was 51% ± 6% at day 60, with significantly better engraftment seen in recipients of higher prefreezing total nucleated cell (TNC) dose (>3.9 10(7)/kg; hazard ratio [HR], 1.5; P = .05). The CI of platelet engraftment at day 180 posttransplantation was 37% ± 7%, that of grade II-IV acute GVHD was 20% ± 5%, and that of chronic GVHD at 3 years was 18% ± 5%. At a median follow-up of 35 months (range, 3-83 months), the estimated probability of 3-year overall survival (OS) was 38% ± 6%. Significantly improved OS was seen in recipients of >3.9 10(7) TNCs/kg prefreezing (45%, compared with 18% for recipients of ? 3.9 10(7) TNC/kg; HR, 0.4; P = .007). These results highlight the fundamental role of cell dose for both engraftment and OS in patients with SAA undergoing UCBT.
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New autoimmune diseases after cord blood transplantation: a retrospective study of EUROCORD and the Autoimmune Disease Working Party of the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation.
Blood
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To describe the incidence, risk factors, and treatment of autoimmune diseases (ADs) occurring after cord blood transplantation (CBT), we analyzed both CBT recipients reported to EUROCORD who had developed at least 1 new AD and those who had not. Fifty-two of 726 reported patients developed at least 1 AD within 212 days (range, 27-4267) after CBT. Cumulative incidence of ADs after CBT was 5.0% +/- 1% at 1 year and 6.6% +/- 1% at 5 years. Patients developing ADs were younger and had more nonmalignant diseases (P < .001). ADs target hematopoietic (autoimmune hemolytic anemia, n = 20; Evans syndrome, n = 9; autoimmune thrombocytopenia, n = 11; and immune neutropenia, n = 1) and other tissues (thyroiditis, n = 3; psoriasis, n = 2; Graves disease, n 1; membranous glomerulonephritis, n = 2; rheumatoid arthritis, n = 1; ulcerative colitis, n = 1; and systemic lupus erythematosus, n = 1). Four patients developed 2 ADs (3 cases of immune thrombocytopenia followed by autoimmune hemolytic anemia and 1 Evans syndrome with rheumatoid arthritis). By multivariate analysis, the main risk factor for developing an AD was nonmalignant disease as an indication for CBT (P = .0001). Hematologic ADs were most often treated with steroids, rituximab, and cyclosporine. With a median follow-up of 26 months (range, 2-91), 6 of 52 patients died as a consequence of ADs. We conclude that CBT may be followed by potentially life-threatening, mainly hematologic ADs.
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Impact of donor-specific anti-HLA antibodies on graft failure and survival after reduced intensity conditioning-unrelated cord blood transplantation: a Eurocord, Société Francophone dHistocompatibilité et dImmunogénétique (SFHI) and Société Française de G
Haematologica
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Graft failure is a major complication after unrelated cord blood transplantation. Presence of HLA-antibodies before cord blood transplantation may impact graft failure. To analyze the effect of anti-HLA antibodies on unrelated cord blood transplantation outcomes, we analyzed 294 unrelated cord blood transplant recipients after reduced intensity conditioning regimen. The majority of the patients (82%) were transplanted for malignancies, 60% with double-unrelated cord blood transplant, 63% were HLA mismatched. Retrospectively, pre-unrelated cord blood transplant serum was tested for HLA-Ab using Luminex™ platform. Results were interpreted as mean fluorescence intensity (MFI) against donor-specific mismatch. Among 62 recipients (23%) who had anti-HLA antibodies before unrelated cord blood transplant, 14 patients had donor specific anti-HLA antibodies (DSA) (7 were donor-specific anti-HLA antibodies for single unrelated cord blood transplant and 7 for double unrelated cord blood transplant). Donor specific anti-HLA antibodies threshold ranged from 1620-17629 of mean fluorescence intensity (MFI). Cumulative incidence of Day-60 neutrophil engraftment was 76%: 44% for recipients with donor specific anti-HLA antibodies and 81% in those without donor specific anti-HLA antibodies (P=0.006). The cumulative incidence of 1-year transplant related mortality was 46% in patients with donor specific anti-HLA antibodies and 32% in those without antibodies (P=0.06). The presence of donor specific anti-HLA antibodies was associated with a trend for decreased survival rate (42% vs. 29%; P=0.07). Donor specific anti-HLA antibody in recipients of unrelated cord blood transplant is associated with graft failure and decreased survival. Patients screening for donor specific anti-HLA antibodies before unrelated cord blood transplantation is recommended before choosing an HLA mismatched cord blood unit. Whenever possible it is important to avoid selecting a unit for which the patient has donor specific anti-HLA antibodies.
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Effect of HLA-matching recipients to donor noninherited maternal antigens on outcomes after mismatched umbilical cord blood transplantation for hematologic malignancy.
Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
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Transplantation-related mortality (TRM) is high after HLA-mismatched umbilical cord blood (UCB) transplantation (UCBT). In utero, exposure to noninherited maternal antigen (NIMA) is recognized by the fetus, which induces T regulator cells to that haplotype. It is plausible that UCBTs in which recipients are matched to donor NIMAs may alleviate some of the excess mortality associated with this treatment. To explore this concept, we used marginal matched-pair Cox regression analysis to compare outcomes in 48 NIMA-matched UCBTs (ie, the NIMA of the donor UCB unit matched to the patient) and in 116 non-NIMA-matched UCBTs. All patients had a hematologic malignancy and received a single UCB unit. Cases and controls were matched on age, disease, disease status, transplantation-conditioning regimen, HLA match, and infused cell dose. TRM was lower after NIMA-matched UCBTs compared with NIMA-mismatched UCBTs (relative risk, 0.48; P = .05; 18% versus 32% at 5 years posttransplantation). Consequently, overall survival was higher after NIMA-matched UCBT. The 5-year probability of overall survival was 55% after NIMA-matched UCBTs versus 38% after NIMA-mismatched UCBTs (P = .04). When faced with the choice of multiple HLA-mismatched UCB units containing adequate cell doses, selecting an NIMA-matched UCB unit may improve survival after mismatched UCBT.
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JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.