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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Insulin-like growth factor-I regulates LH release by modulation of kisspeptin and NMDA-mediated neurotransmission in young and middle-aged female rats.
Endocrinology
PUBLISHED: 03-10-2014
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This study investigated potential mechanisms by which age and IGF-I receptor (IGF-Ir) signaling in the neuroendocrine hypothalamus affect estradiol-positive feedback effects on GnRH neuronal activation and on kisspeptin and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-induced LH release and on the abundance of NMDA receptor subunits Nr1 and Nr2b and Kiss1r transcript and protein in the hypothalamus of young and middle-aged female rats. We infused vehicle, IGF-I, or JB-1, a selective antagonist of IGF-Ir, into the third ventricle of ovariectomized female rats primed with estradiol or vehicle and injected with vehicle, kisspeptin (3 or 30 nmol/kg), or NMDA (15 or 30 mg/kg). Regardless of dose, NMDA and kisspeptin resulted in significantly more LH release, GnRH/c-Fos colabeling, and c-Fos immunoreative cells in young than in middle-aged females. Estradiol priming significantly increased Kiss1r, Nr1, and Nr2b receptor transcript and protein abundance in young but not middle-aged female hypothalamus. JB-1 attenuated kisspeptin and NMDA-induced LH release, numbers of GnRH/c-Fos and c-Fos cells, and Kiss1r, Nr1, and Nr2b transcript and protein abundance in young females to levels observed in middle-aged females. IGF-I significantly enhanced NMDA and kisspeptin-induced LH release in middle-aged females without increasing numbers of GnRH/c-Fos or c-Fos immunoreactive cells. IGF-I infusion in middle-aged females also increased Kiss1r, Nr1, and Nr2b protein and transcript to levels that were equivalent to young estradiol-primed females. These findings indicate that age-related changes in estradiol-regulated responsiveness to excitatory input from glutamate and kisspeptin reflect reduced IGF-Ir signaling.
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Survivin Is a transcriptional target of STAT3 critical to estradiol neuroprotection in global ischemia.
J. Neurosci.
PUBLISHED: 07-26-2013
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Transient global ischemia causes selective, delayed death of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons in humans and animals. It is well established that estrogens ameliorate neuronal death in animal models of focal and global ischemia. However, the role of signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (STAT3) and its target genes in estradiol neuroprotection in global ischemia remains unclear. Here we show that a single intracerebral injection of 17?-estradiol to ovariectomized female rats immediately after ischemia rescues CA1 neurons destined to die. Ischemia promotes activation of STAT3 signaling, association of STAT3 with the promoters of target genes, and STAT3-dependent mRNA and protein expression of prosurvival proteins in the selectively vulnerable CA1. In animals subjected to ischemia, acute postischemic estradiol further enhances activation and nuclear translocation of STAT3 and STAT3-dependent transcription of target genes. Importantly, we show that STAT3 is critical to estradiol neuroprotection, as evidenced by the ability of STAT3 inhibitor peptide and STAT3 shRNA delivered directly into the CA1 of living animals to abolish neuroprotection. In addition, we identify survivin, a member of the inhibitor-of-apoptosis family of proteins and known gene target of STAT3, as essential to estradiol neuroprotection, as evidenced by the ability of shRNA to survivin to reverse neuroprotection. These findings indicate that ischemia and estradiol act synergistically to promote activation of STAT3 and STAT3-dependent transcription of survivin in insulted CA1 neurons and identify STAT3 and survivin as potentially important therapeutic targets in an in vivo model of global ischemia.
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Lordosis facilitation by leptin in ovariectomized, estrogen-primed rats requires simultaneous or sequential activation of several protein kinase pathways.
Pharmacol. Biochem. Behav.
PUBLISHED: 05-12-2013
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The present study tested the hypothesis that the Janus kinase 2, Src tyrosine kinases, and mitogen-activated protein kinase interact to regulate lordosis behavior induced by leptin in ovariectomized, estrogen-primed rats. The role of protein kinase A and protein kinase C in lordosis facilitation by leptin was also assessed. In experiment 1, the intracerebroventricular administration of leptin to ovariectomized, estradiol-primed rats significantly stimulated lordosis behavior at 1, 2 and 4 h post-injection tests. In experiment 2, the Janus kinase 2 inhibitor AG490, the Src tyrosine kinase inhibitor PP2 and the mitogen-activated protein kinase inhibitor PD98059 were administered into the right lateral ventricle before leptin. The lordosis quotient and the lordosis score induced by leptin were significantly decreased by each of these kinase inhibitors. In experiment 3, we examined the effects of RpcAMPS and bisindolylmaleimide, protein kinase A and protein kinase C inhibitors on the lordosis elicited by leptin administration. Lordosis behavior induced by leptin was significantly decreased by both the protein kinase A and protein kinase C inhibitors at 1 h post-leptin injection. The results confirm that multiple intracellular pathways participate in the expression of lordosis behavior in estrogen-primed rats elicited by leptin.
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Neuroprotective action of acute estrogens: animal models of brain ischemia and clinical implications.
Steroids
PUBLISHED: 02-04-2013
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The ovarian hormone 17?-estradiol (E2) exerts profound neuroprotective actions against ischemia-induced brain damage in rodent models of global and focal ischemia. This review focuses on the neuroprotective efficacy of post-ischemic administration of E2 and non-feminizing estrogen analogs in the aging brain, with an emphasis on studies in animals subjected to a long-term loss of circulating E2. Clinical findings from the Womens Health Initiative study as well as data from animal studies that used long-term, physiological levels of E2 treatment are discussed in this context. We summarize major published findings that highlight the effective doses and timing of E2 treatment relative to onset of ischemia. We then discuss recent findings from our laboratory showing that under some conditions the aging hippocampus remains responsive to E2 and some neuroprotective non-feminizing estrogen analogs even after prolonged periods of hormone withdrawal. Possible membrane-initiated signaling mechanisms that may underlie the neuroprotective actions of acutely administered E2 are also discussed. Based on these findings, we suggest that post-ischemic treatment with high doses of E2 or certain non-feminizing estrogen analogs may have great therapeutic potential for treatment of brain damage and neurodegeneration associated with ischemia.
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Absence of colony stimulation factor-1 receptor results in loss of microglia, disrupted brain development and olfactory deficits.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 09-23-2011
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The brain contains numerous mononuclear phagocytes called microglia. These cells express the transmembrane tyrosine kinase receptor for the macrophage growth factor colony stimulating factor-1 (CSF-1R). Using a CSF-1R-GFP reporter mouse strain combined with lineage defining antibody staining we show in the postnatal mouse brain that CSF-1R is expressed only in microglia and not neurons, astrocytes or glial cells. To study CSF-1R function we used mice homozygous for a null mutation in the Csflr gene. In these mice microglia are >99% depleted at embryonic day 16 and day 1 post-partum brain. At three weeks of age this microglial depletion continues in most regions of the brain although some contain clusters of rounded microglia. Despite the loss of microglia, embryonic brain development appears normal but during the post-natal period the brain architecture becomes perturbed with enlarged ventricles and regionally compressed parenchyma, phenotypes most prominent in the olfactory bulb and cortex. In the cortex there is increased neuronal density, elevated numbers of astrocytes but reduced numbers of oligodendrocytes. Csf1r nulls rarely survive to adulthood and therefore to study the role of CSF-1R in olfaction we used the viable null mutants in the Csf1 (Csf1(op)) gene that encodes one of the two known CSF-1R ligands. Food-finding experiments indicate that olfactory capacity is significantly impaired in the absence of CSF-1. CSF-1R is therefore required for the development of microglia, for a fully functional olfactory system and the maintenance of normal brain structure.
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Differential effects of hypothalamic IGF-I on gonadotropin releasing hormone neuronal activation during steroid-induced LH surges in young and middle-aged female rats.
Endocrinology
PUBLISHED: 09-13-2011
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Interactions between brain IGF-I receptors and estrogen receptors regulate female reproductive physiology and behavior. The present study investigated potential mechanisms by which IGF-I receptors in the neuroendocrine hypothalamus regulate GnRH neuronal activation and LH release in young and middle-aged female rats under estradiol (E2) positive feedback conditions. We infused vehicle, IGF-I, or JB-1, a selective antagonist of IGF-I receptors, into the third ventricle of ovariectomized female rats primed with E2 and progesterone or vehicle. In young females, blockade of IGF-I receptors attenuated the steroid hormone-induced LH surge, reduced the percent of GnRH neurons expressing c-fos on the day of the LH surge, and decreased the total number of neurons expressing c-fos in the preoptic area. Middle-aged females had fewer GnRH neurons expressing c-fos during the LH surge than young females, and the LH surge amplitude was attenuated. Infusion of an IGF-I dose previously shown to increase LH surge amplitude did not increase the percent of GnRH neurons expressing c-fos in middle-aged females. Brain IGF-I receptor blockade did not modify E2 induction of progestin receptor-immunoreactive neurons in the preoptic area, arcuate, or ventromedial hypothalamus of young rats. These findings indicate that brain IGF-I receptors are required for E2 activation of GnRH neurons in young rats and for robust GnRH release from axon terminals in middle-aged females. IGF-I likely exerts its effects by actions on E2-sensitive neurons that are upstream of GnRH neurons and terminals.
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The nitric oxide pathway participates in lordosis behavior induced by central administration of leptin.
Neuropeptides
PUBLISHED: 08-04-2011
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Intracerebroventricular (icv) administration of leptin facilitates lordosis behavior in ad libitum-fed, estrogen-primed rats. The cellular mechanism involved in this response is unknown. The present study tested the hypothesis that the nitric oxide-guanylyl cyclase, cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG) pathway is involved in the facilitation of lordosis behavior induced by the central administration of leptin. We tested the importance of the nitric oxide/cGMP pathway for lordosis stimulation by either icv infusion of a nitric oxide synthase inhibitor (L-NAME) or a nitric oxide-dependent, soluble guanylyl cyclase inhibitor (ODQ) 30 min before leptin administration (1 ?g). This dose of leptin reliably induced lordosis behavior in ovariectomized estradiol benzoate treated rats. The lordosis induced by leptin at 1 and 2h after infusion was significantly reduced by the previous injection of either L-NAME or by ODQ. Intracerebroventricular infusion of the PKG inhibitor (KT5823) 30 min before leptin infusion, also significantly inhibited the lordosis behavior induced by leptin at 1 and 2h after hormone administration. These data support the hypothesis that the nitric oxide/cGMP/PKG pathway is involved in the facilitation of lordosis by leptin in estrogen-primed female rats.
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Do steroid hormones play a role in the etiology of glioma?
Cancer Epidemiol. Biomarkers Prev.
PUBLISHED: 09-14-2010
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Gliomas are the most common type of primary malignant brain tumor and have a very poor prognosis. Little is known, however, about the etiology of these tumors. Evidence from a number of sources suggests that endogenous steroid hormones may play a role in the development of gliomas. First, the descriptive epidemiology of glioma suggests a relative protection of females compared with males, particularly during the premenopausal years. Second, some gliomas and glioblastomas express estrogen receptors (ER), especially ER?, as well as aromatase, the enzyme responsible for the conversion of testosterone to estradiol, and possibly other steroid hormone receptors. Third, experimental studies indicate that glioblastomas transplanted into animals grow at a slower rate in females compared with males. Finally, experimental studies show that estradiol, 2-methoxyestradiol, and a number of selective estrogen receptor modulators inhibit proliferation of gliomas and induce cell death. These hormonal agonists and antagonists may act either through classical steroid hormone receptors or independently of such receptors. In view of these findings, further clinical, experimental, and epidemiologic studies are needed to elucidate the role of steroid hormone agonists and antagonists in the development and proliferation of glioma. If hormonal pathways are involved in gliomagenesis, this could eventually lead to the design of preventive strategies.
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Neuroprotective actions of estradiol and novel estrogen analogs in ischemia: translational implications.
Front Neuroendocrinol
PUBLISHED: 09-01-2010
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This review highlights our investigations into the neuroprotective efficacy of estradiol and other estrogenic agents in a clinically relevant animal model of transient global ischemia, which causes selective, delayed death of hippocampal CA1 neurons and associated cognitive deficits. We find that estradiol rescues a significant number of CA1 pyramidal neurons that would otherwise die in response to global ischemia, and this is true when hormone is provided as a long-term pretreatment at physiological doses or as an acute treatment at the time of reperfusion. In addition to enhancing neuronal survival, both forms of estradiol treatment induce measurable cognitive benefit in young animals. Moreover, estradiol and estrogen analogs that do not bind classical nuclear estrogen receptors retain their neuroprotective efficacy in middle-aged females deprived of ovarian hormones for a prolonged duration (8weeks). Thus, non-feminizing estrogens may represent a new therapeutic approach for treating the neuronal damage associated with global ischemia.
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Leptin facilitates lordosis behavior through GnRH-1 and progestin receptors in estrogen-primed rats.
Neuropeptides
PUBLISHED: 08-04-2010
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Dose response curves for leptin facilitation of estrous behavior (lordosis and proceptivity) were made by infusing the peptide into the lateral ventricle (icv) of ovariectomized (ovx), ad libitum-fed rats injected 40h previously with 5?g of estradiol benzoate. Leptin doses of 1 and 3?g produced significant lordosis quotient at 60min post-injection, with maximal lordosis being displayed at 120min. Yet the intensity of lordosis was weak, and a high incidence of rejection behaviors was found. Moreover, leptin did not induce significant proceptive behaviors at any dose. The leptin doses of 1 and 3?g were selected for determining whether antide, a GnRH-1 receptor antagonist, or the progestin receptor antagonist RU486 could modify the lordosis response to leptin. Icv injection of either antide or RU486 1h before leptin significantly depressed leptin facilitation of lordosis. The results suggest that leptin stimulates lordosis by releasing GnRH, which in turn activates GnRH-1 and progestin receptors. The physiological role of leptin in the control of estrous behavior remains to be determined.
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Developing and communicating responsible data management policies to trainees and colleagues.
Sci Eng Ethics
PUBLISHED: 03-24-2010
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The basic components of data management including data ownership, collection, selection, recording, analysis, storage, retention, destruction, and sharing. A number of important principles underlie best practices for each of these components; these include recording details such that another can repeat the experiment, keeping the data safe, managing storage in such a way as to facilitate easy retrieval for the period of time required by regulatory agencies and establishing data sharing principles with colleagues before collaborations begin. Experience as practicing scientists and teachers has aided in developing helpful strategies and approaches for communicating these principles, policies and practices to trainees and colleagues. We recommend didactic instruction focused by discipline, combined with the use of "teachable moments" in a students career, as well as teaching principles versus rules, because changing methods of data collection and storage have implications for data management practices.
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Developing and Communicating Responsible Data Management Policies to Trainees and Colleagues.
Sci Eng Ethics
PUBLISHED: 03-24-2010
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The basic components of data management include data ownership, collection, selection, recording, analysis, storage, retention, destruction, and sharing. A number of important principles underlie best practices for each of these components; these include recording details such that another can repeat the experiment, keeping the data safe, managing storage in such a way as to facilitate easy retrieval for the period of time required by regulatory agencies and establishing data sharing principles with colleagues before collaborations begin. Experience as practicing scientists and teachers has aided in developing helpful strategies and approaches for communicating these principles, policies and practices to trainees and colleagues. We recommend didactic instruction focused by discipline, combined with the use of "teachable moments" in a students career, as well as teaching principles versus rules, because changing methods of data collection and storage have implications for data management practices.
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A role for Src kinase in progestin facilitation of estrous behavior in estradiol-primed female rats.
Horm Behav
PUBLISHED: 02-09-2010
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This study tested the hypothesis that the Src/Raf/MAPK signaling pathway is involved in the facilitation of the lordosis and proceptive behaviors induced by progesterone (P) and its ring A-reduced metabolites in ovariectomized, estradiol-primed rats. Intraventricular (icv) infusion of PP2 (7.5, 15 and 30 microg), a Src kinase inhibitor, significantly depressed P-dependent estrous behavior (lordosis and proceptivity) in estradiol-primed rats. Icv infusion of 30 microg of PP2 also significantly attenuated estrous behavior induced by the ring A-reduced P metabolites 5 alpha-dihydroprogesterone (5 alpha-DHP) and 5 alpha-pregnan-3alpha-ol-20-one (allopregnanolone). PP2 did not inhibit estrous behavior induced by administration of high doses of estradiol alone to ovariectomized rats. We also assessed if the ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH) is one of the neural sites at which progestins activate Src signaling to facilitate estrous behavior. Bilateral administration of 15 microg of PP2 into the VMH inhibited the stimulation of both lordosis and proceptive behaviors elicited by subcutaneous P administration to estradiol-primed rats. These results suggest that progestins act through Src/Raf/MAPK signaling to initiate estrous behaviors in estrogen-primed rats. This event is one component of the cellular pathways leading to the display of estrous behaviors induced by P and its ring A-reduced metabolites in female rats.
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Hypothalamic insulin-like growth factor-I receptors are necessary for hormone-dependent luteinizing hormone surges: implications for female reproductive aging.
Endocrinology
PUBLISHED: 01-22-2010
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Brain IGF-I receptors are required for maintenance of estrous cycles in young adult female rats. Circulating and hypothalamic IGF-I levels decrease with aging, suggesting a role for IGF-I in the onset of reproductive senescence. Therefore, the present study investigated potential mechanisms of action of brain IGF-I receptors in the regulation of LH surges in young adult and middle-aged rats. We continuously infused IGF-I, the selective IGF-I receptor antagonist JB-1, or vehicle into the third ventricle of ovariectomized young adult and middle-aged female rats primed with estradiol and progesterone. Pharmacological blockade of IGF-I receptors attenuated and delayed the LH surge in young adult rats, reminiscent of the LH surge pattern that heralds the onset of reproductive senescence in middle-aged female rats. Infusion of IGF-I alone had no effect on the LH surge but reversed JB-1 attenuation of the surge in young females. In middle-aged rats, infusion of low doses of IGF-I partially restored LH surge amplitude, and infusion of JB-1 completely obliterated the surge. Intraventricular infusion of IGF-I or JB-1 did not modify pituitary sensitivity to exogenous GnRH or GnRH peptide content in the anterior or mediobasal hypothalamus in either young or middle-aged rats. These findings support the hypothesis that brain IGF-I receptor signaling is necessary for GnRH neuron activation under estrogen-positive feedback conditions and that decreased brain IGF-I signaling in middle-aged females contributes, in part, to LH surge dysfunction by disrupting estradiol-sensitive processes that affect GnRH neuron activation and/or GnRH release.
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Acute estradiol protects CA1 neurons from ischemia-induced apoptotic cell death via the PI3K/Akt pathway.
Brain Res.
PUBLISHED: 01-18-2010
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Global ischemia arising during cardiac arrest or cardiac surgery causes highly selective, delayed death of hippocampal CA1 neurons. Exogenous estradiol ameliorates global ischemia-induced neuronal death and cognitive impairment in male and female rodents. However, the molecular mechanisms by which a single acute injection of estradiol administered after the ischemic event intervenes in global ischemia-induced apoptotic cell death are unclear. Here we show that acute estradiol acts via the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (Akt) signaling cascade to protect CA1 neurons in ovariectomized female rats. We demonstrate that global ischemia promotes early activation of glycogen synthase kinase-3beta (GSK3beta) and forkhead transcription factor of the O class (FOXO)3A, known Akt targets that are related to cell survival, and activation of caspase-3. Estradiol prevents ischemia-induced dephosphorylation and activation of GSK3beta and FOXO3A, and the caspase death cascade. These findings support a model whereby estradiol acts by activation of PI3K/Akt signaling to promote neuronal survival in the face of global ischemia.
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Acute administration of non-classical estrogen receptor agonists attenuates ischemia-induced hippocampal neuron loss in middle-aged female rats.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-08-2010
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Pretreatment with 17beta-estradiol (E2) is profoundly neuroprotective in young animals subjected to focal and global ischemia. However, whether E2 retains its neuroprotective efficacy in aging animals, especially when administered after brain insult, is largely unknown.
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The excitatory peptide kisspeptin restores the luteinizing hormone surge and modulates amino acid neurotransmission in the medial preoptic area of middle-aged rats.
Endocrinology
PUBLISHED: 05-07-2009
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Reproductive success depends on a robust and appropriately timed preovulatory LH surge. The LH surge, in turn, requires ovarian steroid modulation of GnRH neuron activation by the neuropeptide kisspeptin and glutamate and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) neurotransmission in the medial preoptic area (mPOA). Middle-aged females exhibit reduced excitation of GnRH neurons and attenuated LH surges under estrogen-positive feedback conditions, in part, due to increased GABA and decreased glutamate neurotransmission in the mPOA. This study tested the hypothesis that altered kisspeptin regulation by ovarian steroids plays a role in age-related LH surge dysfunction. We demonstrate that middle-aged rats exhibiting delayed and attenuated LH surges have reduced levels of Kiss1 mRNA in the anterior hypothalamus under estrogen-positive feedback conditions. Kisspeptin application directly into the mPOA rescues total LH release and the LH surge amplitude in middle-aged rats and increases glutamate and decreases GABA release to levels seen in the mPOA of young females. Moreover, the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist MK801 blocks kisspeptin reinstatement of the LH surge. These observations suggest that age-related LH surge dysfunction results, in part, from reduced kisspeptin drive under estrogen-positive feedback conditions and that kisspeptin regulates GnRH/LH release, in part, through modulation of mPOA glutamate and GABA release.
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Age-related LH surge dysfunction correlates with reduced responsiveness of hypothalamic anteroventral periventricular nucleus kisspeptin neurons to estradiol positive feedback in middle-aged rats.
Neuropharmacology
PUBLISHED: 05-01-2009
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Female reproductive aging in rats is characterized by reduced gonadotropin releasing hormone (GnRH) neuronal activation under estradiol positive feedback conditions and a delayed and attenuated luteinizing hormone (LH) surge. The newly identified excitatory neuropeptide kisspeptin is proposed to be a critical mediator of the pubertal transition and the ovarian steroid-induced LH surge. We previously showed that estradiol induces less kisspeptin mRNA expression in the anterior hypothalamus [anatomical location of anteroventral periventricular nucleus (AVPV)] in middle-aged than in young rats and intrahypothalamic infusion of kisspeptin restores LH surge amplitude in middle-aged females. Thus, reduced kisspeptin neurotransmission may contribute to age-related LH surge abnormalities. This study tested the hypothesis that middle-aged females will also exhibit reduced numbers of kisspeptin immunopositive neurons in the AVPV under estradiol positive feedback conditions. Using immunohistochemistry, we demonstrate that middle-aged females primed with ovarian steroids have fewer AVPV kisspeptin immunopositive neurons than young females. Age did not affect kisspeptin mRNA expression in the pituitary, numbers of kisspeptin immunopositive neurons in the arcuate nucleus, or estradiol-dependent reductions in kisspeptin mRNA expression in the posterior hypothalamus (containing the arcuate nucleus). These data strongly suggest that age-related LH surge dysfunction results, in part, from a reduced sensitivity of AVPV kisspeptin neurons to estradiol and hence decreased availability of AVPV kisspeptin neurons to activate GnRH neurons under positive feedback conditions.
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Estradiol rescues neurons from global ischemia-induced cell death: multiple cellular pathways of neuroprotection.
Steroids
PUBLISHED: 01-08-2009
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The potential neuroprotective role of sex hormones in chronic neurodegenerative disorders and acute brain ischemia following cardiac arrest and stroke is of a great therapeutic interest. Long-term pretreatment with estradiol and other estrogens affords robust neuroprotection in male and female rodents subjected to focal and global ischemia. However, the receptors (e.g., cell surface or nuclear), intracellular signaling pathways and networks of estrogen-regulated genes that intervene in neuronal apoptosis are as yet unclear. We have shown that estradiol administered at physiological levels for two weeks before ischemia rescues neurons destined to die in the hippocampal CA1 and ameliorates ischemia-induced cognitive deficits in ovariectomized female rats. This regimen of estradiol treatment involves classical intracellular estrogen receptors, transactivation of IGF-1 receptors and stimulation of the ERK/MAPK signaling pathway, which in turn maintains CREB activity in the ischemic CA1. We also find that a single, acute injection of estradiol administrated into the brain ventricle immediately after an ischemic event reduces both neuronal death and cognitive deficits. Because these findings suggest that hormones could be used to treat patients when given after brain ischemia, it is critical to determine whether the same or different pathways mediate this form of neuroprotection. We find that an agonist of the membrane estrogen receptor GPR30 mimics short latency estradiol facilitation of synaptic transmission in the hippocampus. Therefore, we are testing the hypothesis that GPR30 may act together with intracellular estrogen receptors to activate cell signaling pathways to promote neuron survival after global ischemia.
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Nitric oxide and ERK/MAPK mediation of estrous behavior induced by GnRH, PGE2 and db-cAMP in rats.
Physiol. Behav.
PUBLISHED: 01-03-2009
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We tested the hypothesis that GnRH, PGE2 and db-cAMP act via the nitric oxide (NO)-cGMP and MAPK pathways to facilitate estrous behavior (lordosis and proceptivity) in estradiol-primed female rats. Estradiol-primed rats received intracerebroventricular (icv) infusions of pharmacological antagonists of NO synthase (L-NAME), NO-dependent soluble guanylyl cyclase (ODQ), protein kinase G (KT5823), or the ERK1/2 inhibitor PD98059 15 min before icv administration of 50 ng of GnRH, 1 microg of PGE2 or 1 microg of db-cAMP. Icv infusions of GnRH, PGE2 and db-cAMP enhanced estrous behavior at 1 and 2 h after drug administration. Both L-NAME and ODQ blocked the estrous behavior induced by GnRH, PGE2 and db-cAMP at some of the times tested. The protein kinase G inhibitor KT5823 reduced PGE2 and db-cAMP facilitation of estrous behavior but did not affect the behavioral response to GnRH. In contrast, PD98059 blocked the estrous behavior induced by all three compounds. These data support the hypothesis that the NO-cGMP and ERK/MAPK pathways are involved in the lordosis and proceptive behaviors induced by GnRH, PGE2 and db-cAMP. However, cGMP mediation of GnRH-facilitated estrous behavior is independent of protein kinase G.
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Src kinase signaling mediates estrous behavior induced by 5?-reduced progestins, GnRH, prostaglandin E2 and vaginocervical stimulation in estrogen-primed rats.
Horm Behav
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The progesterone receptor (PR) is a dual function protein that acts in the nucleus as a transcriptional factor and at the cytoplasm as a scaffold for the Src-MAPK signaling pathway. Several agents lacking affinity for the PR, such as 5?-reduced progestins, GnRH or prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) facilitate estrous behavior in ovariectomized (ovx), estrogen-primed rats yet their action is blocked by the antiprogestin RU486. We hypothesize that these agents act by using the PR-Src-mitogen activated protein kinase alternative pathway. To test this hypothesis we used PP2, a specific inhibitor of the Src kinase family. Intraventricular infusion of 30 ?g of PP2, 30 min before behavioral testing, significantly attenuated estrous behaviors induced in estradiol benzoate (E(2)B)-primed rats by 5?-dihydroprogesterone (5?-DHP), 5?-pregnan-3?-ol-20-one (5?,3?-Pgl), GnRH, PGE(2) and by manual flank/vaginocervical stimulation. These results suggest that the Src signaling system, by activating mitogen-activated protein kinases, participates in the facilitation of estrous behavior in E(2)B-primed rats induced by agents lacking affinity for the PR.
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Coumestrol has neuroprotective effects before and after global cerebral ischemia in female rats.
Brain Res.
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Global ischemia arising during cardiac arrest or cardiac surgery causes highly selective, delayed death of hippocampal CA1 neurons. Phytoestrogens are naturally occurring plant-derived compounds that are present in the human diet and are considered selective estrogen receptor (ER) modulators. The phytoestrogen coumestrol is a potent isoflavonoid, with binding affinities for both ER-? and ER-? that are comparable to those of 17 b-estradiol. The present study examined the hypothesis that coumestrol protects hippocampal neurons in ovariectomized rats in a model of cerebral global ischemia. Ovariectomized rats were subjected to global ischemia (10 min) or sham surgery and received a single intracerebroventricular or peripheral infusion of 20 ?g of coumestrol, 20 ?g of estradiol or vehicle 1h before ischemia or 0 h, 3h, 6h or 24h after reperfusion. Estradiol and coumestrol afforded significant neuroprotection in all times of administration, with the exception of estradiol given 24h after the ischemic insult. Animals received icv infusion of the broad-spectrum ER antagonist ICI 182,780 (50 ?g) or vehicle into the lateral ventricle just before the E2 or coumestrol administration. The ER antagonist abolished estradiol protection, consistent with a role of classical ERs. In contrast, ICI 182,780 effected only partial reversal of the neuroprotective actions of coumestrol, suggesting that other cellular mediators in addition to classical ERs may be important. Additional research is needed to determine the molecular targets mediating the neuroprotective action of coumestrol and the therapeutic potential of this phytoestrogen in the mature nervous system.
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Estradiol attenuates ischemia-induced death of hippocampal neurons and enhances synaptic transmission in aged, long-term hormone-deprived female rats.
PLoS ONE
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Transient global forebrain ischemia causes selective, delayed death of hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons, and the ovarian hormone 17?-estradiol (E2) reduces neuronal loss in young and middle-aged females. The neuroprotective efficacy of E2 after a prolonged period of hormone deprivation is controversial, and few studies examine this issue in aged animals given E2 treatment after induction of ischemia.
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Neuroprotection and estrogen receptors.
Neuroendocrinology
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This review is intended to assess the state of current knowledge on the role of estrogen receptors (ERs) in the neuroprotective effects of estrogens in models for acute neuronal injury and death. We evaluate the overall evidence that estrogens are neuroprotective in acute injury and critically assess the role of ER?, ER?, GPR 30, and nonreceptor-mediated mechanisms in these robust neuroprotective effects of this ovarian steroid hormone. We conclude that all three receptors, as well as nonreceptor-mediated mechanisms can be involved in neuroprotection, depending on the model used, the level of estrogen administrated, and the mode of administration of the steroid. Also, the signaling pathways used by both ER-dependent and ER-independent mechanisms to exert neuroprotection are considered. Finally, further studies that are needed to parse out the relative contribution of receptor versus nonreceptor-mediated signaling are discussed.
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Middle-aged female rats retain sensitivity to the anorexigenic effect of exogenous estradiol.
Behav. Brain Res.
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It is well established that estradiol (E2) decreases food intake and body weight in young female rats. However, it is not clear if female rats retain responsiveness to the anorexigenic effect of E2 during middle age. Because middle-aged females exhibit reduced responsiveness to E2, manifesting as a delayed and attenuated luteinizing hormone surge, it is plausible that middle-aged rats are less responsive to the anorexigenic effect of E2. To test this we monitored food intake in ovariohysterectomized young and middle-aged rats following E2 treatment. E2 decreased food intake and body weight to a similar degree in both young and middle-aged rats. Next, we investigated whether genes that mediate the estrogenic inhibition of food intake are similarly responsive to E2 by measuring gene expression of the anorexigenic genes corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH), proopiomelanocortin (POMC), the long form of the leptin receptor (Lepr) and serotonin 2C receptors (5HT2CR) and the orexigenic genes agouti-related peptide (AgRP), neuropeptide Y (NPY), prepromelanin-concentrating hormone (pMCH) and orexin in the hypothalamus of young and middle-aged OVX rats treated with E2. As expected, E2 increased expression of all anorexigenic genes while decreasing expression of all orexigenic genes in young rats. Although CRH, 5HT2CR, Lepr, AgRP, NPY and orexin were also sensitive to E2 treatment in middle-aged rats, POMC and pMCH expression were not influenced by E2 in middle-aged rats. These data demonstrate that young and middle-aged rats are similarly sensitive to the anorexigenic effect of E2 and that most, but not all feeding-related genes retain sensitivity to E2.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.