JoVE Visualize What is visualize?
Stop Reading. Start Watching.
Advanced Search
Stop Reading. Start Watching.
Regular Search
Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Chemoprevention of prostate cancer with the polyamine synthesis inhibitor difluoromethylornithine.
Recent Results Cancer Res.
PUBLISHED: 02-18-2014
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
In vitro and in vivo preclinical results suggest that inhibition of polyamine synthesis inhibits the progression of prostate cancer. These findings has led to two clinical trials in patients at risk for invasive prostate cancer with difluoromethylornithine which specifically and irreversibly inhibits ornithine decarboxylase which catalyses the conversion of ornithine to putrescine the rate limiting step in polyamines synthesis. We have conducted a phase IIa one month and placebo randomized phase IIb 12 months trials in patients at increased risk for invasive prostate cancer. Favorable reduction in prostate polyamine levels and prostate volume was documented with no difference in clinical hearing changes. Patients with Gleason's VI lesions in a surveillance cohort would be appropriate candidates for a definitive risk reduction trial although the unavailability of validated biomarkers for invasive progression would require a large and lengthy study.
Related JoVE Video
KAVA Chalcone, Flavokawain A, Inhibits Urothelial Tumorigenesis in the UPII-SV40T Transgenic Mouse Model.
Cancer Prev Res (Phila)
PUBLISHED: 10-11-2013
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Flavokawain A (FKA) is the predominant chalcone identified from the kava plant. We have previously shown that FKA preferentially inhibits the growth of p53 defective bladder cancer cell lines. Here, we examined whether FKA could inhibit bladder cancer development and progression in vivo in the UPII-SV40T transgenic model that resembles human urothelial cell carcinoma (UCC) with defects in the p53 and the retinoblastoma (Rb) protein pathways. Genotyped UPII-SV40T mice were fed orally with vehicle control (AIN-93M) or FKA (6 g/kg food; 0.6%) for 318 days starting at 28 days of age. More than 64% of the male mice fed with FKA-containing food survived beyond 318 days of age, whereas only about 38% of the male mice fed with vehicle control food survived to that age (P = 0.0383). The mean bladder weights of surviving male transgenic mice with the control diet versus the FKA diet were 234.6 ± 72.5 versus 96.1 ± 69.4 mg (P = 0.0002). FKA was excreted primarily through the urinary tract and concentrated in the urine up to 8.4 ?mol/L, averaging about 38 times (males) and 15 times (females) more concentrated than in the plasma (P = 0.0001). FKA treatment inhibited the occurrence of high-grade papillary UCC, a precursor to invasive urothelial cancer, by 42.1%. A decreased expression of Ki67, survivin, and X-linked inhibitor of apoptotic proteins (XIAP) and increased expression of p27 and DR5, and the number of terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL)-positive apoptotic cells were observed in the urothelial tissue of FKA-fed mice. These results suggest a potential of FKA in preventing the recurrence and progression of non-muscle-invasive UCC. Cancer Prev Res; 6(12); 1365-75. ©2013 AACR.
Related JoVE Video
Treating chronic myeloid leukemia: improving management through understanding of the patient experience.
Clin J Oncol Nurs
PUBLISHED: 02-02-2013
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
The tremendous progress made in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) treatment affords patients more options than ever. Five currently available BCR-ABL inhibitors form the mainstay of CML treatment, including first-generation imatinib and more potent second-generation BCR-ABL inhibitors dasatinib and nilotinib, with bosutinib and ponatinib having been recently approved for market inclusion. Studies show that dasatinib and nilotinib exhibit greater efficacy than imatinib in first-line chronic-phase CML (CML-CP), allowing more patients to achieve deeper, more rapid responses associated with improved outcomes. With alternatives to imatinib for first-line CML-CP and the wealth of information (and misinformation) on the Internet, a tremendous need exists for clear, accurate facts to assist patients in making treatment decisions. Patients appreciate the guidance of their oncology nurse in providing disease, treatment, and monitoring information tailored to meet their needs. Oncology nurses who are able to clearly explain emerging data, including the meaning and significance of faster, deeper responses, will be a valuable resource to their patients.
Related JoVE Video
Diagnosis of prostate cancer using differentially expressed genes in stroma.
Cancer Res.
PUBLISHED: 04-05-2011
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
More than one million prostate biopsies are performed in the United States every year. A failure to find cancer is not definitive in a significant percentage of patients due to the presence of equivocal structures or continuing clinical suspicion. We have identified gene expression changes in stroma that can detect tumor nearby. We compared gene expression profiles of 13 biopsies containing stroma near tumor and 15 biopsies from volunteers without prostate cancer. About 3,800 significant expression changes were found and thereafter filtered using independent expression profiles to eliminate possible age-related genes and genes expressed at detectable levels in tumor cells. A stroma-specific classifier for nearby tumor was constructed on the basis of 114 candidate genes and tested on 364 independent samples including 243 tumor-bearing samples and 121 nontumor samples (normal biopsies, normal autopsies, remote stroma, as well as stroma within a few millimeters of tumor). The classifier predicted the tumor status of patients using tumor-free samples with an average accuracy of 97% (sensitivity = 98% and specificity = 88%) whereas classifiers trained with sets of 100 randomly generated genes had no diagnostic value. These results indicate that the prostate cancer microenvironment exhibits reproducible changes useful for categorizing the presence of tumor in patients when a prostate sample is derived from near the tumor but does not contain any recognizable tumor.
Related JoVE Video
Lycopene enhances docetaxels effect in castration-resistant prostate cancer associated with insulin-like growth factor I receptor levels.
Neoplasia
PUBLISHED: 03-16-2011
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Docetaxel is currently the most effective drug for the treatment of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC), but it only extends life by an average of 2 months. Lycopene, an antioxidant phytochemical, has antitumor activity against prostate cancer (PCa) in several models and is generally safe. We present data on the interaction between docetaxel and lycopene in CRPC models. The growth-inhibitory effect of lycopene on PCa cell lines was positively associated with insulin-like growth factor I receptor (IGF-IR) levels. In addition, lycopene treatment enhanced the growth-inhibitory effect of docetaxel more effectively on DU145 cells with IGF-IR high expression than on those PCa cell lines with IGF-IR low expression. In a DU145 xenograft tumor model, docetaxel plus lycopene caused tumor regression, with a 38% increase in antitumor efficacy (P = .047) when compared with docetaxel alone. Lycopene inhibited IGF-IR activation through inhibiting IGF-I stimulation and by increasing the expression and secretion of IGF-BP3. Downstream effects include inhibition of AKT kinase activity and survivin expression, followed by apoptosis. Together, the enhancement of docetaxels antitumor efficacy by lycopene supplementation justifies further clinical investigation of lycopene and docetaxel combination for CRPC patients. CRPC patients with IGF-IR-overexpressing tumors may be most likely to benefit from this combination.
Related JoVE Video
Rhodiola rosea extracts and salidroside decrease the growth of bladder cancer cell lines via inhibition of the mTOR pathway and induction of autophagy.
Mol. Carcinog.
PUBLISHED: 03-09-2011
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
The incidence of human urinary bladder cancer increases markedly with age, suggesting a mechanistic connection between aging and bladder carcinogenesis and a potential use of anti-aging agents in bladder cancer chemoprevention. Rhodiola rosea, growing in high altitude or cold regions of the world, has been reported to have anti-aging effects in Drosophila. We demonstrated that a R. rosea extract and one of its bioactive components, salidroside, inhibited the growth of bladder cancer cell lines with a minimal effect on nonmalignant bladder epithelial cells TEU-2. Interestingly, the R. rosea extract and salidroside component exhibited a selective ability to inhibit the growth of p53 knockout primary mouse embryo fibroblasts (p53-/- MEFs) compared to their wild-type counterparts. The growth inhibitory effects of the R. rosea extract and salidroside were, however, attenuated in TSC2 and p53 double knock MEFs (TSC2-/-, p53-/- MEFs), suggesting that TSC2 protein is, at least in part, required for the growth inhibitory effects of the R. rosea extract and salidroside. The R. rosea extract and salidroside treatment of UMUC3 cells resulted in an increase of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK)-? phosphorylation and a decrease of 4E-BP1 phosphorylation, leading to increased binding of 4E-BP1 to m7 GTP. These results indicate that the R. rosea extract and salidroside inhibit translation initiation. Furthermore, both the R. rosea extract and salidroside treatment of UMUC3 cells caused a significant percentage of cells undergoing autophagy. Therefore, the R. rosea extract and salidroside deserve further study as novel agents for chemoprevention of bladder carcinogenesis.
Related JoVE Video
The Wnt inhibitory factor 1 restoration in prostate cancer cells was associated with reduced tumor growth, decreased capacity of cell migration and invasion and a reversal of epithelial to mesenchymal transition.
Mol. Cancer
PUBLISHED: 04-25-2010
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Aberrations in the Wnt pathway have been reported to be involved in the metastasis of prostate cancer (PCa) to bone. We investigated the effect and underlying mechanism of a naturally-occurring Wnt inhibitor, WIF1, on the growth and cellular invasiveness of a bone metastatic PCa cell line, PC3.
Related JoVE Video
Flavokawain B, a kava chalcone, induces apoptosis via up-regulation of death-receptor 5 and Bim expression in androgen receptor negative, hormonal refractory prostate cancer cell lines and reduces tumor growth.
Int. J. Cancer
PUBLISHED: 01-30-2010
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Limited success has been achieved in extending the survival of patients with metastatic and hormone-refractory prostate cancer (HRPC). There is a strong need for novel agents in the treatment and prevention of HRPC. We have shown that flavokawain B (FKB), a kava chalcone, is about 4- to 12-fold more effective in reducing the cell viabilities of androgen receptor (AR)-negative, HRPC cell lines DU145 and PC-3 than AR-positive, hormone-sensitive prostate cancer cell lines LAPC4 and LNCaP, with minimal effect on normal prostatic epithelial and stromal cells. FKB induces apoptosis with an associated increased expression of proapoptotic proteins: death receptor-5, Bim and Puma and a decreased expression of inhibitors of apoptosis protein: XIAP and survivin. Among them, Bim expression was significantly induced by FKB as early as 4 hr of the treatment. Knockdown of Bim expression by short-hairpin RNAs attenuates the inhibitory effect on anchorage-dependent and -independent growth and caspase cleavages induced by FKB. These findings suggest that the effect of FKB, at least in part, requires Bim expression. In addition, FKB synergizes with TRAIL for markedly enhanced induction of apoptosis. Furthermore, FKB treatment of mice bearing DU145 xenograft tumors results in tumor growth inhibition and increases Bim expression in tumor tissues. Together, these results suggest robust mechanisms for FKB induction of apoptosis preferentially for HRPC and the potential usefulness of FKB for prevention and treatment of HRPC in an adjuvant setting.
Related JoVE Video
WIF1, a Wnt pathway inhibitor, regulates SKP2 and c-myc expression leading to G1 arrest and growth inhibition of human invasive urinary bladder cancer cells.
Mol. Cancer Ther.
PUBLISHED: 01-27-2009
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Epigenetic silencing of secreted wingless-type (Wnt) antagonists through hypermethylation is associated with tobacco smoking and with invasive bladder cancer. The secreted Wnt inhibitory factor-1 (WIF1) has shown consistent growth-inhibitory effect on various cancer cell lines. Therefore, we assessed the mechanisms of action of WIF1 by either restoring WIF1 expression in invasive bladder cancer cell lines (T24 and TSU-PR1) or using a recombinant protein containing functional WIF1 domain. Both ectopic expression of WIF1 and treatment with WIF1 domain protein resulted in cell growth inhibition via G(1) arrest. The G(1) arrest induced by WIF1 is associated with down-regulation of SKP2 and c-myc and up-regulation of p21/WAF1 and p27/Kip1. Conversely, reexpression of SKP2 in WIF1-overexpressing TSU-PR1 cells attenuated the WIF1-induced G(1) arrest. Furthermore, inhibition of nuclear Wnt signaling by either dominant-negative LEF1 or short hairpin RNA of TCF4 also reduced SKP2 expression. The human SKP2 gene contains two TCF/LEF1 consensus binding sites within the promoter. Chromatin immunoprecipitation/real-time PCR analysis revealed that both WIF1 and dominant-negative LEF1 expression decreased the in vivo binding of TCF4 and beta-catenin to the SKP2 promoter. Together, our results suggest that mechanisms of WIF1-induced G(1) arrest include (a) SKP2 down-regulation leading to p27/Kip1 accumulation and (b) c-myc down-regulation releasing p21/WAF1 transcription. Additionally, we show that WIF1 inhibits in vivo bladder tumor growth in nude mice. These observations suggest a mechanism for transformation of bladder epithelium on loss of WIF1 function and provide new targets such as SKP2 for intervention in WIF1-deficient bladder cancer.
Related JoVE Video

What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.