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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Cytokine production as a putative biological mechanism underlying stress sensitization in high combat exposed soldiers.
Psychoneuroendocrinology
PUBLISHED: 07-23-2014
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Combat stress exposed soldiers may respond to post-deployment stressful life events (SLE) with increases in symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), consistent with a model of stress sensitization. Several lines of research point to sensitization as a model to describe the relations between exposure to traumatic events, subsequent SLE, and symptoms of PTSD. Based on previous findings we hypothesized that immune activation, measured as a high in vitro capacity of leukocytes to produce cytokines upon stimulation, underlies stress sensitization.
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Pre-deployment differences in glucocorticoid sensitivity of leukocytes in soldiers developing symptoms of PTSD, depression or fatigue persist after return from military deployment.
Psychoneuroendocrinology
PUBLISHED: 06-19-2014
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Deployed soldiers are at risk of developing stress-related conditions, including posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), major depressive disorder (MDD), and severe fatigue. We previously observed condition- and cell-specific differences in sensitivity of immune cells for regulation by glucocorticoids (GCs) pre-deployment between male soldiers with and without subsequent development of high levels of these stress-related symptoms. Here we investigated whether these pre-deployment dysregulations in GC-sensitivity of immune cells persisted after return from military deployment. In a prospective, longitudinal study including 721 male and female soldiers, the in vitro GC-sensitivity of monocytes and T-cells was assessed prior to deployment and one and six months post-deployment. Differences in the longitudinal course of sensitivity for regulation by dexamethasone (DEX) of LPS-stimulated TNF-? production and PHA-stimulated T-cell proliferation between soldiers with and without subsequent symptom development were investigated using linear mixed models. Within the whole group, DEX-sensitivity of monocytes was significantly decreased at six months post-deployment compared to the assessments pre-deployment and one month post-deployment. The DEX-sensitivity of T-cells did not significantly change over time. Participants developing high levels of PTSD symptoms showed high DEX-sensitivity of T-cells, while participants developing high levels of depressive symptoms showed low DEX-sensitivity of T-cells before deployment that persisted at the two time points after return. In addition, participants developing severe fatigue had low DEX-sensitivity of monocytes at all assessments. Our finding that the previously observed pre-deployment group differences in peripheral GC-sensitivity persisted until at least six months after return indicates that in vitro GC-sensitivity of T-cells and monocytes may represent a persistent biological vulnerability factor for development of stress-related conditions PTSD, depression and fatigue.
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Intranasally administered mesenchymal stem cells promote a regenerative niche for repair of neonatal ischemic brain injury.
Exp. Neurol.
PUBLISHED: 02-18-2014
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Previous work from our group has shown that intranasal MSC-treatment decreases lesion volume and improves motor and cognitive behavior after hypoxic-ischemic (HI) brain damage in neonatal mice. Our aim was to determine the kinetics of MSC migration after intranasal administration, and the early effects of MSCs on neurogenic processes and gliosis at the lesion site. HI brain injury was induced in 9-day-old mice and MSCs were administered intranasally at 10days post-HI. The kinetics of MSC migration were investigated by immunofluorescence and MRI analysis. BDNF and NGF gene expression was determined by qPCR analysis following MSC co-culture with HI brain extract. Nestin, Doublecortin, NeuN, GFAP, Iba-1 and M1/M2 phenotypic expression was assessed over time. MRI and immunohistochemistry analyses showed that MSCs reach the lesion site already within 2h after intranasal administration. At 12h after administration the number of MSCs at the lesion site peaks and decreases significantly at 72h. The number of DCX(+) cells increased 1 to 3days after MSC administration in the SVZ. At the lesion, GFAP(+)/nestin(+) and DCX(+) expression increased 3 to 5days after MSC-treatment. The number of NeuN(+) cells increased within 5days, leading to a dramatic regeneration of the somatosensory cortex and hippocampus at 18days after intranasal MSC administration. Interestingly, MSCs expressed significantly more BDNF gene when exposed to HI brain extract in vitro. Furthermore, MSC-treatment resulted in the resolution of the glial scar surrounding the lesion, represented by a decrease in reactive astrocytes and microglia and polarization of microglia towards the M2 phenotype. In view of the current lack of therapeutic strategies, we propose that intranasal MSC administration is a powerful therapeutic option through its functional repair of the lesion represented by regeneration of the cortical and hippocampal structure and decrease of gliosis.
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A novel p38 MAPK docking-groove-targeted compound is a potent inhibitor of inflammatory hyperalgesia.
Biochem. J.
PUBLISHED: 02-13-2014
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The MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) p38 is an important mediator of inflammation and of inflammatory and neuropathic pain. We have described recently that docking-groove-dependent interactions are important for p38 MAPK-mediated signal transduction. Thus virtual screening was performed to identify putative docking-groove-targeted p38 MAPK inhibitors. Several compounds of the benzo-oxadiazol family were identified with low micromolar inhibitory activity both in a p38 MAPK activity assay, and in THP-1 human monocytes acting as inhibitors of LPS (lipopolysaccharide)-induced TNF? (tumour necrosis factor ?) secretion. Positions 2 and 5 in the phenyl ring are essential for the described inhibitory activity with a chloride in position 5 and a methyl group in position 2 yielding the best results, giving an IC?? value of 1.8 ?M (FGA-19 compound). Notably, FGA-19 exerted a potent and long-lasting analgesic effect in vivo when tested in a mouse model of inflammatory hyperalgesia. A single intrathecal injection of FGA-19 completely resolved hyperalgesia, being 10-fold as potent and displaying longer lasting effects than the established p38 MAPK inhibitor SB239063. FGA-19 also reversed persistent pain in a model of post-inflammatory hyperalgesia in LysM (lysozyme M)-GRK2 (G-protein-coupled-receptor kinase)(+/-) mice. These potent in vivo effects suggested p38 MAPK docking-site-targeted inhibitors as a potential novel strategy for the treatment of inflammatory pain.
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Monocytes/Macrophages control resolution of transient inflammatory pain.
J Pain
PUBLISHED: 01-15-2014
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Insights into mechanisms governing resolution of inflammatory pain are of great importance for many chronic pain-associated diseases. Here we investigate the role of macrophages/monocytes and the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-10 (IL-10) in the resolution of transient inflammatory pain. Depletion of mice from peripheral monocytes/macrophages delayed resolution of intraplantar IL-1?- and carrageenan-induced inflammatory hyperalgesia from 1 to 3 days to >1 week. Intrathecal administration of a neutralizing IL-10 antibody also markedly delayed resolution of IL-1?- and carrageenan-induced inflammatory hyperalgesia. Recently, we showed that IL-1?- and carrageenan-induced hyperalgesia is significantly prolonged in LysM-GRK2(+/-) mice, which have reduced levels of G-protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2) in LysM(+) myeloid cells. Here we show that adoptive transfer of wild-type, but not of GRK2(+/-), bone marrow-derived monocytes normalizes the resolution of IL-1?-induced hyperalgesia in LysM-GRK2(+/-) mice. Adoptive transfer of IL-10(-/-) bone marrow-derived monocytes failed to normalize the duration of IL-1?-induced hyperalgesia in LysM-GRK2(+/-) mice. Mechanistically, we show that GRK2(+/-) macrophages produce less IL-10 in vitro. In addition, intrathecal IL-10 administration attenuated IL-1?-induced hyperalgesia in LysM-GRK2(+/-) mice, whereas it had no effect in wild-type mice. Our data uncover a key role for monocytes/macrophages in promoting resolution of inflammatory hyperalgesia via a mechanism dependent on IL-10 signaling in dorsal root ganglia.
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Association between brain natriuretic peptide, markers of inflammation and the objective and subjective response to cardiac resynchronization therapy.
Brain Behav. Immun.
PUBLISHED: 01-10-2014
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Studies suggest that cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) can induce a decrease in brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) and systemic inflammation, which may be associated with CRT-response. However, the evidence is inconclusive. We examined levels of BNP and inflammatory markers from pre-CRT implantation to 14months follow-up in CRT-responders and nonresponders, defined by two response criteria.
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The rodent endovascular puncture model of subarachnoid hemorrhage: mechanisms of brain damage and therapeutic strategies.
J Neuroinflammation
PUBLISHED: 01-03-2014
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Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) represents a considerable health problem. To date, limited therapeutic options are available. In order to develop effective therapeutic strategies for SAH, the mechanisms involved in SAH brain damage should be fully explored. Here we review the mechanisms of SAH brain damage induced by the experimental endovascular puncture model. We have included a description of similarities and distinctions between experimental SAH in animals and human SAH pathology. Moreover, several novel treatment options to diminish SAH brain damage are discussed.SAH is accompanied by cerebral inflammation as demonstrated by an influx of inflammatory cells into the cerebral parenchyma, upregulation of inflammatory transcriptional pathways and increased expression of cytokines and chemokines. Additionally, various cell death pathways including cerebral apoptosis, necrosis, necroptosis and autophagy are involved in neuronal damage caused by SAH.Treatment strategies aiming at inhibition of inflammatory or cell death pathways demonstrate the importance of these mechanisms for survival after experimental SAH. Moreover, neuroregenerative therapies using stem cells are discussed as a possible strategy to repair the brain after SAH since this therapy may extend the window of treatment considerably. We propose the endovascular puncture model as a suitable animal model which resembles the human pathology of SAH and which could be applied to investigate novel therapeutic therapies to combat this debilitating insult.
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Intranasal Administration of Human MSC for Ischemic Brain Injury in the Mouse: In Vitro and In Vivo Neuroregenerative Functions.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
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Intranasal treatment with C57BL/6 MSCs reduces lesion volume and improves motor and cognitive behavior in the neonatal hypoxic-ischemic (HI) mouse model. In this study, we investigated the potential of human MSCs (hMSCs) to treat HI brain injury in the neonatal mouse. Assessing the regenerative capacity of hMSCs is crucial for translation of our knowledge to the clinic. We determined the neuroregenerative potential of hMSCs in vitro and in vivo by intranasal administration 10 d post-HI in neonatal mice. HI was induced in P9 mouse pups. 1×106 or 2×106 hMSCs were administered intranasally 10 d post-HI. Motor behavior and lesion volume were measured 28 d post-HI. The in vitro capacity of hMSCs to induce differentiation of mouse neural stem cell (mNSC) was determined using a transwell co-culture differentiation assay. To determine which chemotactic factors may play a role in mediating migration of MSCs to the lesion, we performed a PCR array on 84 chemotactic factors 10 days following sham-operation, and at 10 and 17 days post-HI. Our results show that 2×106 hMSCs decrease lesion volume, improve motor behavior, and reduce scar formation and microglia activity. Moreover, we demonstrate that the differentiation assay reflects the neuroregenerative potential of hMSCs in vivo, as hMSCs induce mNSCs to differentiate into neurons in vitro. We also provide evidence that the chemotactic factor CXCL10 may play an important role in hMSC migration to the lesion site. This is suggested by our finding that CXCL10 is significantly upregulated at 10 days following HI, but not at 17 days after HI, a time when MSCs no longer reach the lesion when given intranasally. The results described in this work also tempt us to contemplate hMSCs not only as a potential treatment option for neonatal encephalopathy, but also for a plethora of degenerative and traumatic injuries of the nervous system.
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The anti-diabetic drug metformin protects against chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy in a mouse model.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
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Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) characterized by loss of sensory sensitivity and pain in hands and feet is the major dose-limiting toxicity of many chemotherapeutics. At present, there are no FDA-approved treatments for CIPN. The anti-diabetic drug metformin is the most widely used prescription drug in the world and improves glycemic control in diabetes patients. There is some evidence that metformin enhances the efficacy of cancer treatment. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that metformin protects against chemotherapy-induced neuropathic pain and sensory deficits. Mice were treated with cisplatin together with metformin or saline. Cisplatin induced increased sensitivity to mechanical stimulation (mechanical allodynia) as measured using the von Frey test. Co-administration of metformin almost completely prevented the cisplatin-induced mechanical allodynia. Co-administration of metformin also prevented paclitaxel-induced mechanical allodynia. The capacity of the mice to detect an adhesive patch on their hind paw was used as a novel indicator of chemotherapy-induced sensory deficits. Co-administration of metformin prevented the cisplatin-induced increase in latency to detect the adhesive patch indicating that metformin prevents sensory deficits as well. Moreover, metformin prevented the reduction in density of intra-epidermal nerve fibers (IENFs) in the paw that develops as a result of cisplatin treatment. We conclude that metformin protects against pain and loss of tactile function in a mouse model of CIPN. The finding that metformin reduces loss of peripheral nerve endings indicates that mechanism underlying the beneficial effects of metformin includes a neuroprotective activity. Because metformin is widely used for treatment of type II diabetes, has a broad safety profile, and is currently being tested as an adjuvant drug in cancer treatment, clinical translation of these findings could be rapidly achieved.
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The neuroimmune basis of fatigue.
Trends Neurosci.
PUBLISHED: 07-16-2013
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The exact nature and pathophysiology of fatigue remain largely elusive despite its high prevalence in physically ill patients. Studies on the relationship between the immune system and the central nervous system provide a new perspective on the mechanisms of fatigue. Inflammatory mediators that are released by activated innate immune cells at the periphery and in the central nervous system alter the metabolism and activity of neurotransmitters, generate neurotoxic compounds, decrease neurotrophic factors, and profoundly disturb the neuronal environment. The resulting alterations in fronto-striatal networks together with the activation of insula by inflammatory interoceptive stimuli underlie the many dimensions of fatigue including reduced incentive motivation, decreased behavioral flexibility, uncertainty about usefulness of actions, and awareness of fatigue.
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Therapeutic potential of genetically modified mesenchymal stem cells after neonatal hypoxic-ischemic brain damage.
Mol. Ther.
PUBLISHED: 06-12-2013
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Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) have been shown to improve outcome after neonatal hypoxic ischemic brain injury possibly by secretion of growth factors stimulating repair processes. We investigated whether MSC, modified to secrete specific growth factors, can further enhance recovery. Using an in vitro assay we show that MSC secreting BDNF, EGFL7, PSP or SHH regulate proliferation and differentiation of neural stem cells. Moreover, mice that received an intranasal application of 100.000 MSC-BDNF (MSC-BDNF) showed significantly improved outcome as demonstrated by improved motor function and decreased lesion volume compared to mice treated with empty vector (EV-)MSC. Treatment with MSC-EGFL7 did improve motor function, but had no effect on lesion size. Treatment with MSC-PSP or MSC-SHH did neither improve outcome nor reduce lesion size in comparison to MSC-EV treated mice. Moreover, mice treated with MSC-SHH showed even decreased functional outcome when compare to MSC-EV. Treatment with MSC-BDNF induced cell proliferation in the ischemic hemisphere lasting at least 18 days after MSC administration while treatment with MSC-EV did not. These data suggest that gene-modified cell therapy might be a useful approach to consider for treatment of neonatal HI brain damage. However, care must be taken when selecting the agent to overexpress.Molecular Therapy (2013); doi:10.1038/mt.2013.260.
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Balancing GRK2 and EPAC1 levels prevents and relieves chronic pain.
J. Clin. Invest.
PUBLISHED: 05-13-2013
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Chronic pain is a major clinical problem, yet the mechanisms underlying the transition from acute to chronic pain remain poorly understood. In mice, reduced expression of GPCR kinase 2 (GRK2) in nociceptors promotes cAMP signaling to the guanine nucleotide exchange factor EPAC1 and prolongs the PGE2-induced increase in pain sensitivity (hyperalgesia). Here we hypothesized that reduction of GRK2 or increased EPAC1 in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons would promote the transition to chronic pain. We used 2 mouse models of hyperalgesic priming in which the transition from acute to chronic PGE2-induced hyperalgesia occurs. Hyperalgesic priming with carrageenan induced a sustained decrease in nociceptor GRK2, whereas priming with the PKC? agonist ??RACK increased DRG EPAC1. When either GRK2 was increased in vivo by viral-based gene transfer or EPAC1 was decreased in vivo, as was the case for mice heterozygous for Epac1 or mice treated with Epac1 antisense oligodeoxynucleotides, chronic PGE2-induced hyperalgesia development was prevented in the 2 priming models. Using the CFA model of chronic inflammatory pain, we found that increasing GRK2 or decreasing EPAC1 inhibited chronic hyperalgesia. Our data suggest that therapies targeted at balancing nociceptor GRK2 and EPAC1 levels have promise for the prevention and treatment of chronic pain.
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Mesenchymal stem cell transplantation attenuates brain injury after neonatal stroke.
Stroke
PUBLISHED: 03-28-2013
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Brain injury caused by stroke is a frequent cause of perinatal morbidity and mortality with limited therapeutic options. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) have been shown to improve outcome after neonatal hypoxic-ischemic brain injury mainly by secretion of growth factors stimulating repair processes. We investigated whether MSC treatment improves recovery after neonatal stroke and whether MSC overexpressing brain-derived neurotrophic factor (MSC-BDNF) further enhances recovery.
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The endogenous regenerative capacity of the damaged newborn brain: boosting neurogenesis with mesenchymal stem cell treatment.
J. Cereb. Blood Flow Metab.
PUBLISHED: 02-13-2013
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Neurogenesis continues throughout adulthood. The neurogenic capacity of the brain increases after injury by, e.g., hypoxia-ischemia. However, it is well known that in many cases brain damage does not resolve spontaneously, indicating that the endogenous regenerative capacity of the brain is insufficient. Neonatal encephalopathy leads to high mortality rates and long-term neurologic deficits in babies worldwide. Therefore, there is an urgent need to develop more efficient therapeutic strategies. The latest findings indicate that stem cells represent a novel therapeutic possibility to improve outcome in models of neonatal encephalopathy. Transplanted stem cells secrete factors that stimulate and maintain neurogenesis, thereby increasing cell proliferation, neuronal differentiation, and functional integration. Understanding the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying neurogenesis after an insult is crucial for developing tools to enhance the neurogenic capacity of the brain. The aim of this review is to discuss the endogenous capacity of the neonatal brain to regenerate after a cerebral ischemic insult. We present an overview of the molecular and cellular mechanisms underlying endogenous regenerative processes during development as well as after a cerebral ischemic insult. Furthermore, we will consider the potential to use stem cell transplantation as a means to boost endogenous neurogenesis and restore brain function.
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Dexamethasone attenuates VEGF expression and inflammation but not barrier dysfunction in a murine model of ventilator-induced lung injury.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-21-2013
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Ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI) is characterized by vascular leakage and inflammatory responses eventually leading to pulmonary dysfunction. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) has been proposed to be involved in the pathogenesis of VILI. This study examines the inhibitory effect of dexamethasone on VEGF expression, inflammation and alveolar-capillary barrier dysfunction in an established murine model of VILI.
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Mitochondrial JNK phosphorylation as a novel therapeutic target to inhibit neuroinflammation and apoptosis after neonatal ischemic brain damage.
Neurobiol. Dis.
PUBLISHED: 01-12-2013
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Neonatal encephalopathy is associated with high mortality and life-long developmental consequences. Therapeutic options are very limited. We assessed the effects of D-JNKi, a small peptide c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) MAP kinase inhibitor, on neuroinflammation, mitochondrial integrity and neuronal damage in a neonatal rat model of ischemic brain damage. Hypoxic-ischemic (HI) brain injury was induced in postnatal-day 7 rats by unilateral carotid artery occlusion and hypoxia, and was followed by intraperitoneal D-JNKi treatment. We demonstrate here for the first time that a single intraperitoneal injection with D-JNKi directly after HI strongly reduces neonatal brain damage by >85% with a therapeutic window of at least 6h. D-JNKi treatment also restored cognitive and motor function as analyzed at 9weeks post-insult. Neuroprotective D-JNKi treatment inhibited phosphorylation of nuclear c-Jun (P-c-Jun), and consequently reduced activity of the AP-1 transcription factor and production of cerebral cytokines/chemokines as determined at 3 and 24h post-HI. Inhibition of P-c-Jun by D-JNKi is thought to be mediated via inhibition of the upstream phosphorylation of cytosolic and nuclear JNK and/or by preventing the direct interaction of phosphorylated (P-)JNK with c-Jun. Surprisingly, however, HI did not induce a detectable increase in P-JNK in cytosol or nucleus. Notably, we show here for the first time that HI induces P-JNK only in the mitochondrial fraction, which was completely prevented by D-JNKi treatment. The hypothesis that mitochondrial JNK activation is key to HI brain injury was supported by data showing that treatment of rat pups with SabKIM1 peptide, a specific mitochondrial JNK inhibitor, is also neuroprotective. Inhibition of HI-induced mitochondrial JNK activation was associated with preservation of mitochondrial integrity as evidenced by prevention of ATP loss and inhibition of lipid peroxidation. The HI-induced increase in apoptotic markers (cytochrome c release and caspase 3 activation) as analyzed at 24h post-HI were also strongly reduced by D-JNKi and the mitochondrial anti-apoptotic proteins Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL were upregulated. Neuroprotection was lost after repeated 0+3h D-JNKi treatment which was associated with complete inhibition of the second peak of AP-1 activity and disability to upregulate mitochondrial Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL. We show here for the first time that D-JNKi treatment efficiently protects the neonatal brain against ischemic brain damage and subsequent cognitive and motor impairment. We propose that inhibition of phosphorylation of mitochondrial JNK is a pivotal step in preventing early loss of mitochondrial integrity leading to reduced neuroinflammation and inhibition of apoptotic neuronal loss. Moreover we show the crucial role of upregulation of mitochondrial anti-apoptotic proteins to maintain neuroprotection.
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Astrocyte GRK2 as a novel regulator of glutamate transport and brain damage.
Neurobiol. Dis.
PUBLISHED: 01-08-2013
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G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) kinase 2 (GRK2) regulates cellular signaling via desensitization of GPCRs and by direct interaction with intracellular signaling molecules. We recently described that ischemic brain injury decreases cerebral GRK2 levels. Here we studied the effect of astrocyte GRK2-deficiency on neonatal brain damage in vivo. As astrocytes protect neurons by taking up glutamate via plasma-membrane transporters, we also studied the effect of GRK2 on the localization of the GLutamate ASpartate Transporter (GLAST). Brain damage induced by hypoxia-ischemia was significantly reduced in GFAP-GRK2(+/-) mice, which have a 60% reduction in astrocyte GRK2 compared to GFAP-WT littermates. In addition, GRK2-deficient astrocytes have higher plasma-membrane levels of GLAST and an increased capacity to take up glutamate in vitro. In search for the mechanism by which GRK2 regulates GLAST expression, we observed increased GFAP levels in GRK2-deficient astrocytes. GFAP and the cytoskeletal protein ezrin are known regulators of GLAST localization. In line with this evidence, GRK2-deficiency reduced phosphorylation of the GRK2 substrate ezrin and enforced plasma-membrane GLAST association after stimulation with the group I mGluR-agonist DHPG. When ezrin was silenced, the enhanced plasma-membrane GLAST association in DHPG-exposed GRK2-deficient astrocytes was prevented. In conclusion, we identified a novel role of astrocyte GRK2 in regulating plasma-membrane GLAST localization via an ezrin-dependent route. We demonstrate that the 60% reduction in astrocyte GRK2 protein level that is observed in GFAP-GRK2(+/-) mice is sufficient to significantly reduce neonatal ischemic brain damage. These findings underline the critical role of GRK2 regulation in astrocytes for dampening the extent of brain damage after ischemia.
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G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 and group I metabotropic glutamate receptors mediate inflammation-induced sensitization to excitotoxic neurodegeneration.
Ann. Neurol.
PUBLISHED: 01-03-2013
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The concept of inflammation-induced sensitization is emerging in the field of perinatal brain injury, stroke, Alzheimer disease, and multiple sclerosis. However, mechanisms underpinning this process remain unidentified.
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Intranasal mesenchymal stem cell treatment for neonatal brain damage: long-term cognitive and sensorimotor improvement.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-03-2013
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Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) administration via the intranasal route could become an effective therapy to treat neonatal hypoxic-ischemic (HI) brain damage. We analyzed long-term effects of intranasal MSC treatment on lesion size, sensorimotor and cognitive behavior, and determined the therapeutic window and dose response relationships. Furthermore, the appearance of MSCs at the lesion site in relation to the therapeutic window was examined. Nine-day-old mice were subjected to unilateral carotid artery occlusion and hypoxia. MSCs were administered intranasally at 3, 10 or 17 days after hypoxia-ischemia (HI). Motor, cognitive and histological outcome was investigated. PKH-26 labeled cells were used to localize MSCs in the brain. We identified 0.5 × 10(6) MSCs as the minimal effective dose with a therapeutic window of at least 10 days but less than 17 days post-HI. A single dose was sufficient for a marked beneficial effect. MSCs reach the lesion site within 24 h when given 3 or 10 days after injury. However, no MSCs were detected in the lesion when administered 17 days following HI. We also show for the first time that intranasal MSC treatment after HI improves cognitive function. Improvement of sensorimotor function and histological outcome was maintained until at least 9 weeks post-HI. The capacity of MSCs to reach the lesion site within 24 h after intranasal administration at 10 days but not at 17 days post-HI indicates a therapeutic window of at least 10 days. Our data strongly indicate that intranasal MSC treatment may become a promising non-invasive therapeutic tool to effectively reduce neonatal encephalopathy.
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Effects of murine and human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells on cuprizone induced demyelination.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
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For the treatment of patients with multiple sclerosis there are no regenerative approaches to enhance remyelination. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) have been proposed to exert such regenerative functions. Intravenous administration of human MSC reduced the clinical severity of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model mimicking some aspects of multiple sclerosis. However, it is not clear if this effect was achieved by systemic immunomodulation or if there is an active neuroregeneration in the central nervous system (CNS). In order to investigate remyelination and regeneration in the CNS we analysed the effects of intravenously and intranasally applied murine and human bone marrow-derived MSC on cuprizone induced demyelination, a toxic animal model which allows analysis of remyelination without the influence of the peripheral immune system. In contrast to EAE no effects of MSC on de- and remyelination and glial cell reactions were found. In addition, neither murine nor human MSC entered the lesions in the CNS in this toxic model. In conclusion, MSC are not directed into CNS lesions in the cuprizone model where the blood-brain-barrier is intact and thus cannot provide support for regenerative processes.
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Stem cell therapy for neonatal brain injury: perspectives and challenges.
Ann. Neurol.
PUBLISHED: 12-14-2011
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Cerebral palsy is a major health problem caused by brain damage during pregnancy, delivery, or the immediate postnatal period. Perinatal stroke, intraventricular hemorrhage, and asphyxia are the most common causes of neonatal brain damage. Periventricular white matter damage (periventricular leukomalacia) is the predominant form in premature infants and the most common antecedent of cerebral palsy. Stem cell treatment has proven effective in restoring injured organs and tissues in animal models. The potential of stem cells for self-renewal and differentiation translates into substantial neuroprotection and neuroregeneration in the animal brain, with minimal risks of rejection and side effects. Stem cell treatments described to date have used neural stem cells, embryonic stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells, umbilical cord stem cells, and induced pluripotent stem cells. Most of these treatments are still experimental. In this review, we focus on the efficacy of stem cell therapy in animal models of cerebral palsy, and discuss potential implications for current and future clinical trials.
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Cytokine production by leukocytes of military personnel with depressive symptoms after deployment to a combat-zone: a prospective, longitudinal study.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 09-15-2011
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Major depressive disorder (MDD) is frequently diagnosed in military personnel returning from deployment. Literature suggests that MDD is associated with a pro-inflammatory state. To the best of our knowledge, no prospective, longitudinal studies on the association between development of depressive symptomatology and cytokine production by peripheral blood leukocytes have been published. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the presence of depressive symptomatology six months after military deployment is associated with the capacity to produce cytokines, as assessed before and after deployment. 1023 military personnel were included before deployment. Depressive symptoms and LPS- and T-cell mitogen-induced production of 16 cytokines and chemokines in whole blood cultures were measured before (T0), 1 (T1), and 6 (T2) months after return from deployment. Exploratory structural equation modeling (ESEM) was used for data reduction into cytokine patterns. Multiple group latent growth modeling was used to investigate differences in the longitudinal course of cytokine production between individuals with (n?=?68) and without (n?=?665) depressive symptoms at T2. Individuals with depressive symptoms after deployment showed higher T-cell cytokine production before deployment. Moreover, pre-deployment T-cell cytokine production significantly predicted the presence of depressive symptomatology 6 months after return. There was an increase in T-cell cytokine production over time, but this increase was significantly smaller in individuals developing depressive symptoms. T-cell chemokine and LPS-induced innate cytokine production decreased over time and were not associated with depressive symptoms. These results indicate that increased T-cell mitogen-induced cytokine production before deployment may be a vulnerability factor for development of depressive symptomatology in response to deployment to a combat-zone. In addition, deployment to a combat-zone affects the capacity of T-cells and monocytes to produce cytokines and chemokines until at least 6 months after return.
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Glucocorticoid receptor pathway components predict posttraumatic stress disorder symptom development: a prospective study.
Biol. Psychiatry
PUBLISHED: 09-07-2011
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Biological correlates of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) have mostly been studied using cross-sectional or posttrauma prospective designs. Therefore, it remains largely unknown whether previously observed biological correlates of PTSD precede trauma exposure. We investigated whether glucocorticoid receptor (GR) pathway components assessed in leukocytes before military deployment represent preexisting vulnerability factors for development of PTSD symptoms.
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Osteopontin enhances endogenous repair after neonatal hypoxic-ischemic brain injury.
Stroke
PUBLISHED: 06-23-2011
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Hypoxic-ischemic (HI) brain injury is a frequent cause of perinatal morbidity and mortality with limited therapeutic options. To identify molecules important for cerebral damage and repair, we investigated the growth factor-related gene expression profile after neonatal cerebral HI. We identified osteopontin (OPN) as the most highly upregulated factor early after HI. We therefore explored the role of endogenous OPN in brain damage and repair.
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Fatigue, depressive symptoms, and anxiety from adolescence up to young adulthood: a longitudinal study.
Brain Behav. Immun.
PUBLISHED: 04-21-2011
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Fatigue is a common complaint among adolescents. We investigated the course of fatigue in females during the transition from adolescence to young adulthood and examined psychological, immunological, and life style risk factors for development of fatigue and chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS)-related symptoms. Six hundred and thirty-three healthy females (age 14.63±1.37 years) filled out questionnaires measuring fatigue severity, depressive symptoms, anxiety, chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS)-related symptoms, sleep features, and life style characteristics at baseline and 4½ years thereafter. Of 64 participants LPS- and CD2CD28-induced cytokine data at baseline were available. The best predictor of fatigue in young adulthood was previous fatigue severity. In participants who were non-fatigued during adolescence and who experienced a notable increase in fatigue, fatigue development was preceded by emotional problems and CFS-related complaints during adolescence. Increases as well as decreases in fatigue severity were accompanied by respectively increase and decrease in depressive symptoms and anxiety, suggesting that these symptoms cluster and co-vary over time. Higher interferon (IFN)-?, higher IFN-?/interleukin (IL)-4 ratio, lower tumor necrosis factor-? and lower IL-10 at baseline were related to fatigue severity at follow up. The rise in total number of CFS-related symptoms at follow up was predicted by anxiety and decreased physical activity during adolescence. Sleep and substance use were associated with fatigue severity and anxiety and depression. In conclusion, vulnerability to develop fatigue and associated symptoms in young adulthood can to a certain extent be identified already years before the manifestation of complaints.
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Longitudinal manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of delayed brain damage after hypoxic-ischemic injury in the neonatal rat.
Neonatology
PUBLISHED: 04-20-2011
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Hypoxia-ischemia (HI) in the neonatal brain results in a prolonged injury process. Longitudinal studies using noninvasive methods can help elucidate the mechanisms behind this process. We have recently demonstrated that manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can depict areas with activated microglia and astrogliosis 7 days after hypoxic-ischemic brain injury.
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Reduced Th2 cytokine production by sarcoidosis patients in clinical remission with chronic fatigue.
Brain Behav. Immun.
PUBLISHED: 03-16-2011
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When the inflammatory phase of sarcoidosis has resolved, complaints of chronic fatigue frequently persist. Low-grade residual inflammatory activity may play a role in maintaining chronic fatigue. The aim of this study was to compare in vitro cytokine/chemokine production and plasma cytokine/chemokine levels between chronically fatigued and non-fatigued patients with sarcoidosis in clinical remission. Patients with sarcoidosis in clinical remission were assigned to a non-fatigued group (n=38) or a fatigued group (n=34) based on the standardized cut-off of the fatigue questionnaire Checklist Individual Strength. Cytokines/chemokines in plasma and in supernatants of whole blood cultures stimulated with either a T cell mitogen or lipopolysaccharide were quantified by multiplex analysis. Associations of cytokine/chemokine profiles with chronic fatigue were analyzed by multivariate analysis of variance and principal component analysis followed by logistic regression. Principal component analysis of T cell mitogen-induced cytokine/chemokine production identified three components that explained 76% of the variance in the cytokine/chemokine data. Logistic regression revealed that the Th2 cytokine-component which mainly consists of interleukin (IL)-4, IL-5 and IL-10 was significantly and negatively associated with chronic fatigue. In addition, multivariate analysis revealed higher levels of LPS-induced IL-8 and lower levels of plasma monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1 in the fatigued group compared to the non-fatigued group. In chronically fatigued sarcoidosis patients in clinical remission, we found a cytokine/chemokine profile which is suggestive for a less competent Th2 counterbalancing capacity, that may contribute to the persistence of chronic fatigue.
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Mesenchymal stem cell transplantation changes the gene expression profile of the neonatal ischemic brain.
Brain Behav. Immun.
PUBLISHED: 03-01-2011
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Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) treatment is an effective strategy to reduce brain damage after neonatal hypoxia-ischemia (HI) in mice. We recently showed that a single injection with MSC at either 3 or 10 days after HI (MSC-3 or MSC-10) increases neurogenesis. In case of two injections (MSC-3+10), the second MSC application does not increase neurogenesis, but promotes corticospinal tract remodeling. Here we investigated GFP(+)-MSC engraftment level in the brain using quantitative-PCR analysis. We show for the first time that in the neonatal ischemic brain survival of transplanted MSC is very limited. At 3 days after injection ?22% of transplanted MSC were still detectable and 18 days after the last administration barely ?1%. These findings indicate that engraftment of MSC is not likely the underlying mechanism of the efficient regenerative process. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that the effects of MSC-treatment on regenerative processes are related to specific changes in the gene expression of growth factors and cytokines in the damaged area of the brain using PCR-array analysis. We compared the effect of one (MSC-10) or two (MSC-3+10) injections of 10(5) MSC on gene expression in the brain. Our data show that MSC-10 induced expression of genes regulating proliferation/survival. In response to MSC-3+10-treatment a pattern functionally categorized as growth stimulating genes was increased. Collectively, our data indicate that specific regulation of the endogenous growth factor milieu rather than replacement of damaged tissue by exogenous MSC mediates regeneration of the damaged neonatal brain by MSC-treatment.
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Microglial GRK2: a novel regulator of transition from acute to chronic pain.
Brain Behav. Immun.
PUBLISHED: 02-15-2011
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Pain is a hallmark of tissue damage and inflammation promoting tissue protection and thereby contributing to repair. Therefore, transient acute pain is an important feature of the adaptive response to damage. However, in a significant number of cases, pain persists for months to years after the problem that originally caused the pain has resolved. Such chronic pain is maladaptive as it no longer serves a protective aim. Chronic pain is debilitating, both physiologically and psychologically, and treatments to provide relief from chronic pain are often ineffective. The neurobiological mechanisms underlying the transition from adaptive acute pain to maladaptive chronic pain are only partially understood. In this review, we will summarize recent evidence that a kinase known as G protein-coupled receptor kinase (GRK2) is a key regulator of the transition from acute to chronic inflammatory pain. Our recent studies have shown that mice with a reduction in the cellular level of GRK2 develop chronic hyperalgesia in response to inflammatory mediators that induce only transient hyperalgesia in WT mice. This finding is clinically relevant because rodent models of chronic pain are associated with reduced cellular levels of GRK2. We propose that GRK2 is a newly discovered major player in the regulation of chronic pain. The pathways regulated by this kinase may open up new avenues for development of treatment strategies that target the cause, and not the symptoms of chronic pain.
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Targeting the p53 pathway to protect the neonatal ischemic brain.
Ann. Neurol.
PUBLISHED: 02-06-2011
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To investigate whether inhibition of mitochondrial p53 association using pifithrin-? (PFT-?) represents a potential novel neuroprotective strategy to combat perinatal hypoxic-ischemic (HI) brain damage.
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GRK2 in sensory neurons regulates epinephrine-induced signalling and duration of mechanical hyperalgesia.
Pain
PUBLISHED: 01-26-2011
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Epinephrine (EPI) contributes to hyperalgesia in inflammatory and stress conditions. EPI signals via adrenoceptors, which are regulated by G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2). We previously reported that GRK2 is decreased in nociceptors during chronic inflammation. Herein, we investigated whether GRK2 modulates EPI-induced mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia by using GRK2(+/-) mice, which express 50% of the GRK2 protein. We demonstrate for the first time that EPI-induced mechanical as well as thermal hyperalgesia is prolonged to approximately 21 days in GRK2(+/-) mice, whereas it lasts only 3 to 4 days in wild-type mice. Using cell- specific GRK2-deficient mice, we further show that a low level of GRK2 in primary sensory neurons is critical for this prolongation of EPI-induced hyperalgesia. Low GRK2 in microglia had only a small effect on EPI-induced hyperalgesia. Low GRK2 in astrocytes did not alter EPI-induced hyperalgesia. EPI-induced hyperalgesia was prolonged similarly in mice with tamoxifen-induced homozygous or heterozygous deletion of GRK2. In terms of EPI signalling pathways, the protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor H-89 inhibited EPI-induced mechanical hyperalgesia in wild-type mice, whereas H-89 had no effect in mice with low GRK2 in sensory neurons (SNS-GRK2(+/-) mice). Conversely, intraplantar injection of the protein kinase C? PKC? inhibitor TAT-PKC(?v1-2) inhibited hyperalgesia in sensory neuron specific (SNS)-GRK2(+/-) mice and not in wild-type mice. These results indicate that low GRK2 in primary sensory neurons switches EPI-induced signalling from a protein kinase A-dependent toward a PKC?-dependent pathway that ultimately mediates prolonged EPI-induced hyperalgesia.
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Growth differentiation factor 15 deficiency protects against atherosclerosis by attenuating CCR2-mediated macrophage chemotaxis.
J. Exp. Med.
PUBLISHED: 01-17-2011
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Growth differentiation factor (GDF) 15 is a member of the transforming growth factor ? (TGF-?) superfamily, which operates in acute phase responses through a currently unknown receptor. Elevated GDF-15 serum levels were recently identified as a risk factor for acute coronary syndromes. We show that GDF-15 expression is up-regulated as disease progresses in murine atherosclerosis and primarily colocalizes with plaque macrophages. Hematopoietic GDF-15 deficiency in low density lipoprotein receptor(-/-) mice led to impaired initial lesion formation and increased collagen in later lesions. Although lesion burden in GDF-15(-/-) chimeras was unaltered, plaques had reduced macrophage infiltrates and decreased necrotic core formation, all features of improved plaque stability. In vitro studies pointed to a TGF?RII-dependent regulatory role of GDF-15 in cell death regulation. Importantly, GDF-15(-/-) macrophages displayed reduced CCR2 expression, whereas GDF-15 promoted macrophage chemotaxis in a strictly CCR2- and TGF?RII-dependent manner, a phenomenon which was not observed in G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2(+/-) macrophages. In conclusion, GDF-15 deletion has a beneficial effect both in early and later atherosclerosis by inhibition of CCR2-mediated chemotaxis and by modulating cell death. Our study is the first to identify GDF-15 as an acute phase modifier of CCR2/TGF?RII-dependent inflammatory responses to vascular injury.
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Pre-existing high glucocorticoid receptor number predicting development of posttraumatic stress symptoms after military deployment.
Am J Psychiatry
PUBLISHED: 11-15-2010
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The development of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is influenced by preexisting vulnerability factors. The authors aimed at identifying a preexisting biomarker representing a vulnerability factor for the development of PTSD. To that end, they determined whether the dexamethasone binding capacity of leukocytes, as a measure of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) number, before exposure to trauma was a predictor of development of PTSD symptoms. In addition, the authors analyzed mRNA expression for GR subtypes and GR target genes.
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Angiopoietin-1 treatment reduces inflammation but does not prevent ventilator-induced lung injury.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 10-07-2010
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Loss of integrity of the epithelial and endothelial barriers is thought to be a prominent feature of ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI). Based on its function in vascular integrity, we hypothesize that the angiopoietin (Ang)-Tie2 system plays a role in the development of VILI. The present study was designed to examine the effects of mechanical ventilation on the Ang-Tie2 system in lung tissue. Moreover, we evaluated whether treatment with Ang-1, a Tie2 receptor agonist, protects against inflammation, vascular leakage and impaired gas exchange induced by mechanical ventilation.
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Low nociceptor GRK2 prolongs prostaglandin E2 hyperalgesia via biased cAMP signaling to Epac/Rap1, protein kinase Cepsilon, and MEK/ERK.
J. Neurosci.
PUBLISHED: 09-24-2010
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Hyperexcitability of peripheral nociceptive pathways is often associated with inflammation and is an important mechanism underlying inflammatory pain. Here we describe a completely novel mechanism via which nociceptor G-protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2) contributes to regulation of inflammatory hyperalgesia. We show that nociceptor GRK2 is downregulated during inflammation. In addition, we show for the first time that prostaglandin E2 (PGE2)-induced hyperalgesia is prolonged from <6 h in wild-type (WT) mice to 3 d in mice with low GRK2 in Nav1.8+ nociceptors (SNS-GRK2+/- mice). This prolongation of PGE2 hyperalgesia in SNS-GRK2+/- mice does not depend on changes in the sensitivity of the prostaglandin receptors because prolonged hyperalgesia also developed in response to 8-Br-cAMP. PGE2 or cAMP-induced hyperalgesia in WT mice is PKA dependent. However, PKA activity is not required for hyperalgesia in SNS-GRK2+/- mice. SNS-GRK2+/- mice developed prolonged hyperalgesia in response to the Exchange proteins directly activated by cAMP (Epac) activator 8-pCPT-2-O-Me-cAMP (8-pCPT). Coimmunoprecipitation experiments showed that GRK2 binds to Epac1. In vitro, GRK2 deficiency increased 8-pCPT-induced activation of the downstream effector of Epac, Rap1, and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). In vivo, inhibition of MEK1 or PKC? prevented prolonged PGE2, 8-Br-cAMP, and 8-pCPT hyperalgesia in SNS-GRK2+/- mice. In conclusion, we discovered GRK2 as a novel Epac1-interacting protein. A reduction in the cellular level of GRK2 enhances activation of the Epac-Rap1 pathway. In vivo, low nociceptor GRK2 leads to prolonged inflammatory hyperalgesia via biased cAMP signaling from PKA to Epac-Rap1, ERK/PKC? pathways.
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A prospective study on personality and the cortisol awakening response to predict posttraumatic stress symptoms in response to military deployment.
J Psychiatr Res
PUBLISHED: 07-22-2010
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Few prospective studies on pre-trauma predictors for subsequent development of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) have been conducted. In this study we prospectively investigated whether pre-deployment personality and the cortisol awakening response (CAR) predicted development of PTSD symptoms in response to military deployment. Furthermore, we hypothesized that potential effects of age, childhood trauma and previous deployment on development of PTSD symptoms were mediated via pre-deployment personality, CAR and PTSD symptoms. Path analysis was performed on data from 470 male soldiers collected before and six months after a 4-month deployment to Afghanistan. Before deployment, personality was assessed with the short-form Temperament-Character Inventory and the Cook-Medley Hostility scale. In addition, pre-deployment saliva sampling for assessment of the CAR was performed immediately after awakening and 15, 30 and 60min thereafter. Pre-deployment high hostility and low self-directedness represented intrinsic vulnerabilities for development of PTSD symptoms after deployment. The CAR assessed before deployment did not predict PTSD symptoms after deployment. Pre-deployment low-to-moderate PTSD symptoms were associated with PTSD symptoms after deployment. As hypothesized, the effects of age and childhood trauma on PTSD symptoms after deployment were mediated via personality and pre-deployment PTSD symptoms. However, the number of previous deployments was not related to development of PTSD symptoms. The total model explained 24% of variance in PTSD symptoms after military deployment.
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Nasal administration of stem cells: a promising novel route to treat neonatal ischemic brain damage.
Pediatr. Res.
PUBLISHED: 07-20-2010
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Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) transplantation is a promising therapy to regenerate the brain after an ischemic event. We investigated the possibility to use the nasal route as a noninvasive method to repair the neonatal damaged brain. Nine-day-old mice underwent cerebral hypoxia-ischemia (HI), and MSCs were transplanted intranasally 10 d after HI. At 28 d after HI, MSCs were still present in the affected hemisphere but had not differentiated into cerebral cell types. Intranasal MSC treatment significantly improved sensorimotor function in the cylinder rearing test at 21 and 28 d after HI. Furthermore, intranasal MSC treatment decreased gray and white matter area loss when determined 28 d after HI by 34 and 37%, respectively. MSC cultured in vitro with brain extracts obtained 10 d after HI, responded to the ischemic brain by up-regulation of several growth factors, including fibroblast growth factor 2 and nerve growth factor in comparison with brain extracts of sham-operated controls. In conclusion, MSC can reliably be delivered to the brain via the nasal route to induce functional recovery and a reduction in brain lesion size. We propose that MSC function by stimulating endogenous cerebral repair by adapting their secretion profile to the ischemic brain leading to up-regulation of repair promoting factors.
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Central administration of lipopolysaccharide induces depressive-like behavior in vivo and activates brain indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase in murine organotypic hippocampal slice cultures.
J Neuroinflammation
PUBLISHED: 07-16-2010
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Transient stimulation of the innate immune system by an intraperitoneal injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) activates peripheral and central expression of the tryptophan degrading enzyme indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase (IDO) which mediates depressive-like behavior. It is unknown whether direct activation of the brain with LPS is sufficient to activate IDO and induce depressive-like behavior.
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Repeated mesenchymal stem cell treatment after neonatal hypoxia-ischemia has distinct effects on formation and maturation of new neurons and oligodendrocytes leading to restoration of damage, corticospinal motor tract activity, and sensorimotor function.
J. Neurosci.
PUBLISHED: 07-16-2010
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Birth asphyxia is a frequent cause of perinatal morbidity and mortality with limited therapeutic options. We show that a single mesenchymal stem cell treatment at 3 d (MSC-3) after neonatal hypoxia-ischemia (HI) in postnatal day 9 mice improved sensorimotor function and reduced lesion size. A second MSC treatment at 10 d after HI (MSC-3+10) further enhanced sensorimotor improvement and recovery of MAP2 and MBP (myelin basic protein) staining. Ipsilateral anterograde corticospinal tract tracing with biotinylated dextran amine (BDA) showed that HI reduced BDA labeling of the contralateral spinal cord. Only MSC-3+10 treatment partially restored contralateral spinal cord BDA staining, indicating enhanced axonal remodeling. MSC-3 enhanced formation of bromodeoxyuridine-positive neurons and oligodendrocytes. Interestingly, the second gift at day 10 did not further increase new cell formation, whereas only MSC-10 did. These findings indicate that increased positive effect of MSC-3+10 compared with MSC-3 alone is mediated via distinct pathways. We hypothesize that MSCs adapt their growth and differentiation factor production to the needs of the environment at the time of intracranial injection. Comparing the response of MSCs to in vitro culture with HI brain extracts obtained at day 10 from MSC-3- or vehicle-treated animals by pathway-focused PCR array analysis revealed that 29 genes encoding secreted factors were indeed differentially regulated. We propose that the function of MSCs is dictated by adaptive specific signals provided by the damaged and regenerating brain.
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Impaired neuroendocrine and immune response to acute stress in medication-naive patients with a first episode of psychosis.
Schizophr Bull
PUBLISHED: 06-17-2010
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Little is known about how the biological stress response systems--the autonomic nervous system (ANS), the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, and the immune system--function during psychosis. Results of studies on the effect of stress on the immune and autonomic system in patients with schizophrenia are inconsistent. The present study investigates whether the stress response is impaired in medication-naive patients with a first episode of psychosis. Ten male patients with a first episode of psychosis and 15 controls were exposed to the stress of public speaking. Parameters of the ANS (heart rate and catecholamines), the HPA axis (plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone [ACTH] and cortisol), and the immune system (number and activity of natural killer [NK] cells) were measured. Peak responses were calculated to examine the relationship between stress-induced activation of the different systems. Subjective stress and anxiety before and during the task were assessed. Patients and controls displayed similar autonomic responses to acute stress. However, there was an impaired HPA axis response, slow onset and return of ACTH, and flattened cortisol response and a reduced increase in number NK cells and NK cell activity in patients with a first episode of psychosis. Furthermore, in patients, the relationship between the different stress response systems was weaker or absent compared with controls. These findings indicate that impairments in stress processing are associated with the endophenotype of psychosis and are not a result of illness progression or antipsychotic medication.
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NEUROBID--an EU-funded project to study the developing brain barriers.
Int. J. Dev. Neurosci.
PUBLISHED: 04-01-2010
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Brain diseases are one of the most prevalent groups of diseases in Europe with estimated annual costs amounting to euro386 billion. Data collected by the WHO suggest that brain diseases are responsible for 35% of Europes total disease burden. In the treatment of neurological disease, the blood brain barrier (BBB) still represents an obstacle for the delivery of drugs to the brain and thus a major challenge for the development of therapeutic regimens. Understanding the molecular basis and functioning of the BBB in health and disease, including transport mechanisms across the BBB, therefore holds significant potential for future strategies to prevent and ameliorate neurological disease. Recent research indicates that some neurological disorders have a developmental etiologic component. The major goal of the NEUROBID project is thus to understand the molecular mechanisms and function of the BBB in health and disease both in the developing brain and the adult central nervous system. With an interdisciplinary consortium from the fields of developmental neurobiology and BBB research, NEUROBID aims to (i) understand the involvement of normal and disturbed BBB function in normal and abnormal brain development and (ii) to develop novel strategies for drug delivery to the brain. Unique transport mechanisms across the BBB will be used to target potential therapeutic macromolecular and cellular agents specifically to the brain barriers and transport them into the brain. The main target disorders of NEUROBID are non-inherited neurodevelopmental disorders arising from perinatal adverse exposure, such as cerebral palsy, and classic adult neurological disorders such as multiple sclerosis and stroke. In the long term, NEUROBID hopes to pave the way for new treatment strategies and thus reduce the economic and social burden of neurological disease.
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Natural selection of human embryos: decidualizing endometrial stromal cells serve as sensors of embryo quality upon implantation.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 03-30-2010
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Pregnancy is widely viewed as dependent upon an intimate dialogue, mediated by locally secreted factors between a developmentally competent embryo and a receptive endometrium. Reproductive success in humans is however limited, largely because of the high prevalence of chromosomally abnormal preimplantation embryos. Moreover, the transient period of endometrial receptivity in humans uniquely coincides with differentiation of endometrial stromal cells (ESCs) into highly specialized decidual cells, which in the absence of pregnancy invariably triggers menstruation. The role of cyclic decidualization of the endometrium in the implantation process and the nature of the decidual cytokines and growth factors that mediate the crosstalk with the embryo are unknown.
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Natural selection of human embryos: impaired decidualization of endometrium disables embryo-maternal interactions and causes recurrent pregnancy loss.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 03-15-2010
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Recurrent pregnancy loss (RPL), defined as 3 or more consecutive miscarriages, is widely attributed either to repeated chromosomal instability in the conceptus or to uterine factors that are poorly defined. We tested the hypothesis that abnormal cyclic differentiation of endometrial stromal cells (ESCs) into specialized decidual cells predisposes to RPL, based on the observation that this process may not only be indispensable for placenta formation in pregnancy but also for embryo recognition and selection at time of implantation.
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Is bacterial vaginosis associated with a pro-inflammatory cytokine profile in endometrial secretions of women undergoing IVF?
Reprod. Biomed. Online
PUBLISHED: 02-22-2010
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The objective of this prospective cohort study was to elucidate whether bacterial vaginosis (BV) is associated with a pro-inflammatory endometrial secretion cytokine profile and whether there is a relationship between BV and the concentrations of a number of key regulatory cytokines, chemokines and growth factors. A total of 198 women undergoing IVF treatment were included. Prior to embryo transfer, participants underwent screening for BV according to Nugent criteria by a Gram-stained cervical smear. The concentrations of 17 soluble mediators of human implantation were measured by multiplex immunoassay in endometrial secretions aspirated prior to embryo transfer. Seventeen (8.6%) women had BV (Nugent score >6). Multivariable logistic regression showed a significant positive association between interleukin-beta and the presence of BV (P=0.011; Nugent score >6 versus 6) and a significant negative association between eotaxin and BV (P=0.003). No significant differences were found in the ratios of distinct pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines in endometrial secretions from women with or without BV. In conclusion, BV is associated with higher concentrations of interleukin-beta in endometrial secretions compared with women without BV. However, no distinct difference in pro- and anti-inflammatory profiles is present. An effect on endometrial receptivity is unlikely.
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Stimulation of ??-adrenergic receptors inhibits calcineurin activity in CD4(+) T cells via PKA-AKAP interaction.
Brain Behav. Immun.
PUBLISHED: 02-12-2010
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The sympathetic nervous system (SNS) is able to modulate immune functions via adrenoceptor-dependent mechanisms. Activation of ??-adrenergic receptors (AR) on CD4(+) T lymphocytes has been shown to inhibit Th1-cytokine production and cell proliferation. Here, we investigated the role of the calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein phosphatase calcineurin (CaN), a key element of the T cell receptor (TCR)-signaling pathway, in ??-AR-mediated suppression of T cell function. Purified rat splenic CD4(+) T cells were stimulated with anti-CD3/anti-CD28 in presence or absence of the ??-AR agonist terbutaline (TERB). Treatment with TERB induced a dose-dependent inhibition of cellular CaN activity, along with a reduction in IL-2 and IFN-? production, and T cell proliferation. Co-administration of the ?-AR antagonist nadolol abolished these effects. Blockade of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) with the inhibitor H-89 completely prevented TERB-induced CaN inhibition. However, a receptor-independent rise in the second messenger cAMP was not sufficient to suppress CaN activity. Disruption of the interaction between PKA and A-kinase anchoring protein (AKAP) by the inhibitor peptide St-Ht31 fully blocked TERB-induced CaN inhibition, demonstrating that PKA-AKAP interaction is essential for the ??-AR-mediated CaN inhibition. Taken together, this study provides evidence for a link between the ??-AR and TCR signaling pathways since expression of IL-2 and IFN-? in activated T cells largely depends on dephosphorylation of the transcription factor NFAT by CaN, and identifies a novel intracellular mechanism that can lead to downregulation of T cell function after SNS activation.
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GRK2: a novel cell-specific regulator of severity and duration of inflammatory pain.
J. Neurosci.
PUBLISHED: 02-12-2010
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Chronic pain associated with inflammation is a common clinical problem, and the underlying mechanisms have only begun to be unraveled. GRK2 regulates cellular signaling by promoting G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) desensitization and direct interaction with downstream kinases including p38. The aim of this study was to determine the contribution of GRK2 to regulation of inflammatory pain and to unravel the underlying mechanism. GRK2(+/-) mice with an approximately 50% reduction in GRK2 developed increased and markedly prolonged thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia after carrageenan-induced paw inflammation or after intraplantar injection of the GPCR-binding chemokine CCL3. The effect of reduced GRK2 in specific cells was investigated using Cre-Lox technology. Carrageenan- or CCL3-induced hyperalgesia was increased but not prolonged in mice with decreased GRK2 only in Na(v)1.8 nociceptors. In vitro, reduced neuronal GRK2 enhanced CCL3-induced TRPV1 sensitization. In vivo, CCL3-induced acute hyperalgesia in GRK2(+/-) mice was mediated via TRPV1. Reduced GRK2 in microglia/monocytes only was required and sufficient to transform acute carrageenan- or CCL3-induced hyperalgesia into chronic hyperalgesia. Chronic hyperalgesia in GRK2(+/-) mice was associated with ongoing microglial activation and increased phospho-p38 and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) in the spinal cord. Inhibition of spinal cord microglial, p38, or TNF-alpha activity by intrathecal administration of specific inhibitors reversed ongoing hyperalgesia in GRK2(+/-) mice. Microglia/macrophage GRK2 expression was reduced in the lumbar ipsilateral spinal cord during neuropathic pain, underlining the pathophysiological relevance of microglial GRK2. Thus, we identified completely novel cell-specific roles of GRK2 in regulating acute and chronic inflammatory hyperalgesia.
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NF-kappaB inhibition after neonatal cerebral hypoxia-ischemia improves long-term motor and cognitive outcome in rats.
Neurobiol. Dis.
PUBLISHED: 01-22-2010
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We recently demonstrated that inhibition of the NF-kappaB-pathway by the specific peptide inhibitor TAT-NBD markedly reduced cerebral injury in a rat model of perinatal hypoxic-ischemic (HI) brain damage. The aim of the current study was to assess whether neuroprotection by TAT-NBD is associated with long-term functional improvements after neonatal HI. Postnatal-day 7 rats subjected to HI showed motor deficits in the cylinder rearing test and adhesive removal task. HI-treated animals also showed cognitive impairments in a visuo-spatial learning task (modified hole board) as defined by an increased latency to complete this task and increased numbers of short- and long-term memory errors. HI animals treated with TAT-NBD [20mg/kg i.p.] at 0 and 3h post-HI did not show impairments in the cylinder rearing test, adhesive removal task and modified hole board. In conclusion, the almost complete reduction in lesion size observed after TAT-NBD treatment was associated with long-lasting normalization of sensorimotor and cognitive functions.
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Microglial/macrophage GRK2 determines duration of peripheral IL-1beta-induced hyperalgesia: contribution of spinal cord CX3CR1, p38 and IL-1 signaling.
Pain
PUBLISHED: 01-19-2010
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Chronic pain associated with inflammation is a major clinical problem, but the underlying mechanisms are incompletely understood. Recently, we reported that GRK2(+/-) mice with a approximately 50% reduction of GRK2 develop prolonged hyperalgesia following a single intraplantar injection of the pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta). Here we show that spinal microglia/macrophage GRK2 is reduced during chronic inflammation-induced hyperalgesia. Next, we applied CRE-Lox technology to create mice with low GRK2 in microglia/macrophages/granulocytes (LysM-GRK2(f/+)), or sensory neurons or astrocytes. Only mice deficient in microglial/macrophage/granulocyte GRK2 display prolonged IL-1beta-induced hyperalgesia that lasts up to 8days. Two days after intraplantar IL-1beta, increased microglial/macrophage activity occurs in the lumbar but not thoracic spinal cord of GRK2-deficient mice. Intrathecal pre-treatment with minocycline, an inhibitor of microglia/macrophage activation, accelerates resolution of hyperalgesia independent of genotype and prevents transition to chronic hyperalgesia in GRK2(+/-) mice. Ongoing hyperalgesia in GRK2(+/-) mice is reversed by minocycline administration at days 1 and 2 after IL-1beta injection. Similarly, IL-1beta-induced hyperalgesia in LysM-GRK2(f/+) mice is attenuated by intrathecal administration of anti-CX3CR1 to abrogate fractalkine signaling, the p38 inhibitor SB239063 and the IL-1 antagonist IL-1ra. These data establish that chronic inflammatory hyperalgesia is associated with reduced GRK2 in microglia/macrophages and that low GRK2 in these cells is sufficient to markedly prolong hyperalgesia after a single intraplantar injection of IL-1beta. Ongoing hyperalgesia is maintained by spinal microglial/macrophage activity, fractalkine signaling, p38 activation and IL-1 signaling. We propose that chronic inflammation decreases spinal microglial/macrophage GRK2, which prevents silencing of microglia/macrophage activity and thereby contributes to prolonged hyperalgesia.
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Pharmacological neuroprotection after perinatal hypoxic-ischemic brain injury.
Curr Neuropharmacol
PUBLISHED: 01-12-2010
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Perinatal hypoxia-ischemia (HI) is an important cause of neonatal brain injury. Recent progress in the search for neuroprotective compounds has provided us with several promising drugs to reduce perinatal HI-induced brain injury. In the early stage (first 6 hours after birth) therapies are concentrated on prevention of the production of reactive oxygen species or free radicals (xanthine-oxidase-, nitric oxide synthase-, and prostaglandin inhibition), anti-inflammatory effects (erythropoietin, melatonin, Xenon) and anti-apoptotic interventions (nuclear factor kappa B- and c-jun N-terminal kinase inhibition); in a later stage stimulation of neurotrophic properties in the neonatal brain (erythropoietin, growth factors) can be targeted to promote neuronal and oligodendrocyte regeneration. Combination of pharmacological means of treatment with moderate hypothermia, which is accepted now as a meaningful therapy, is probably the next step in clinical treatment to fight post-asphyxial brain damage. Further studies should be directed at a more rational use of therapies by determining the optimal time and dose to inhibit the different potentially destructive molecular pathways or to enhance endogenous repair while at the same time avoiding adverse effects of the drugs used.
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Cell-specific roles of GRK2 in onset and severity of hypoxic-ischemic brain damage in neonatal mice.
Brain Behav. Immun.
PUBLISHED: 10-21-2009
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The ubiquitously expressed kinase GRK2 protects against cellular overstimulation by desensitizing G protein-coupled receptors and regulating intracellular signaling. Recently, we described that hypoxia-ischemia (HI)-induced brain damage was accelerated and increased in GRK2(+/-) neonatal mice. Using Cre-Lox technology we now investigated the role of decreased GRK2 in only microglia/macrophages or forebrain neurons in development of HI brain injury. Low GRK2 in microglia/macrophages (LysM-GRK2(f/+) mice) was sufficient to accelerate onset of HI damage, without affecting the severity of brain injury at 24h post-HI as compared to LysM-GRK2(+/+) littermates. Consistently, the ipsilateral hemisphere of GRK2(+/-) mice contained microglia with a more rounded phenotype compared to WT mice at 3h post-HI. Inhibition of microglial/macrophage activity by minocycline treatment prevented the early onset of HI injury in GRK2(+/-) mice. In vitro, primary GRK2(+/-) microglia stimulated with LPS produced more TNF-alpha than WT microglia via a p38-dependent pathway. In vivo, HI-induced cerebral p38 activation and TNF-alpha production were increased in GRK2(+/-) mice or in LysM-GRK2(f/+) mice. Our findings indicate that low GRK2 in microglia/macrophages accelerates brain damage via a GRK2/p38/TNF-alpha-dependent pathway. Reduced GRK2 only in forebrain neurons (CamKIIalpha-GRK2(f/+) mice) significantly increased severity of HI brain damage without affecting the onset of brain damage. In conclusion, our data indicate that low GRK2 in microglia/macrophages facilitates activation of these cells which may contribute to the earlier onset of cerebral HI injury associated with increased p38 phosphorylation and TNF-alpha production. The level of GRK2 in neurons is crucial for determining the ultimate severity of HI damage in the newborn brain.
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Mesenchymal stem cell treatment after neonatal hypoxic-ischemic brain injury improves behavioral outcome and induces neuronal and oligodendrocyte regeneration.
Brain Behav. Immun.
PUBLISHED: 09-12-2009
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Birth asphyxia is a frequent cause of perinatal morbidity and mortality and treatment options are very limited. Our aim was to determine the effects of treatment with bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) after neonatal hypoxic-ischemic brain injury (HI). Nine-day old mice were exposed to cerebral HI and endogenous cell proliferation was determined by BrdU-incorporation. Maximal endogenous cell proliferation, indicative for a trophic milieu, was observed at 3 days after HI. MSC transplantation at this time point decreased neuronal and oligodendrocyte loss when determined 21 days after HI by 42% and 31%, respectively. MSC treatment enhanced BrdU-incorporation in the ischemic hemisphere mainly in cells of recipient origin. The percentage of recently divided neurons and oligodendrocytes in hippocampus and cortex was increased after MSC transplantation. MSC treatment reduced the percentage of cortical and increased the percentage of hippocampal BrdU+-astrocytes. The percentage of BrdU+-microglia decreased after MSC treatment. Motoric behavior in the cylinder rearing test at 10 and 21 days after HI was significantly improved by MSC treatment 3 days after the insult. Moreover, even when treatment was started at 10 days after HI, there was a significant reduction in lesion size and improvement of behavioral outcome. Our data show that MSC treatment after neonatal HI brain damage improved functional outcome, reduced lesion volume, increased differentiation of recently divided cells towards neurons and oligodendrocytes and decreased proliferating inflammatory cells. We propose that MSC transplantation is a powerful treatment to improve behavioral outcome and cerebral lesion volume after neonatal brain damage via stimulation of endogenous repair processes.
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Inhibition of the JNK/AP-1 pathway reduces neuronal death and improves behavioral outcome after neonatal hypoxic-ischemic brain injury.
Brain Behav. Immun.
PUBLISHED: 08-25-2009
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Perinatal hypoxic-ischemic (HI) brain damage continues to be a major clinical problem. We investigated the contribution of the MAP kinase c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), to neonatal HI brain damage. JNK regulates several transcriptional (via AP-1 activation) and non-transcriptional processes involved in brain damage such as inflammation and cell death/survival. P7 rats were subjected to HI by unilateral carotid artery occlusion and hypoxia. HI-induced activation of cerebral AP-1 peaked at 3-6h post-HI. Intraperitoneal administration of the JNK-inhibitor TAT-JBD immediately after HI prevented AP-1 activation. TAT-JBD treatment within 3h after HI reduced early neuronal damage by approximately 30%. JNK/AP-1 inhibition did not reduce HI-induced cytokine/chemokine expression. Analysis of indicators of apoptotic cell death revealed that TAT-JBD markedly reduced the HI-induced increase in active caspase 3. However, the upstream mediators of apoptosis: active caspase 8, cleaved Bid, mitochondrial cytochrome c release and caspase 9 cleavage were not reduced after TAT-JBD. TAT-JBD inhibited the HI-induced increase in Smac/DIABLO, an inhibitor of IAPs that prevent activation of caspase 3. TAT-JBD treatment also reduced cleavage of alpha-fodrin, indicating that calpain-mediated brain damage was reduced. Neuroprotection by TAT-JBD treatment was long-lasting as gray- and white matter damage was diminished by approximately 50% at 14 weeks post-HI concomitantly with marked improvement of sensorimotor behavior and cognitive functioning. In conclusion, JNK inhibition by TAT-JBD treatment reduced neonatal HI brain damage with a therapeutic window of 3h and long-lasting anatomical and behavioral improvements. We propose that inhibition of mitochondrial Smac/DIABLO release and calpain activation contribute to neuroprotection by TAT-JBD.
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Mild neonatal hypoxia-ischemia induces long-term motor- and cognitive impairments in mice.
Brain Behav. Immun.
PUBLISHED: 07-30-2009
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To understand and potentially treat the lifelong cognitive and motor deficits in humans resulting from perinatal mild cerebral hypoxic-ischemic (HI) events, valid animal models are of high importance. Nowadays the murine model of neonatal cerebral HI-injury (unilateral carotid artery occlusion followed by hypoxia) is applied more frequently. In the present study we investigated motor, behavioral and cognitive functioning in mice with mild cerebral HI-injury (45 min of hypoxia; HI-45) in comparison to mice exposed to severe HI (HI-75) and sham-control mice. Lateralizing motor disturbances as measured using the cylinder rearing test developed in both HI-45 and HI-75 mice and was significantly more severe in HI-75 animals. To assess behavior and cognitive functions, we used the modified hole board (mHB) test in two stages. First, the ability of the animals to find the three food rewards in cued holes over time was determined. The results revealed an overall learning impairment in HI-75 mice, while HI-45 mice were not different from sham controls. In the second stage, a reversal test was performed with rewarded cylinders being non-cued and non-rewarded cylinders being cued. This reversal-task revealed impairments in cognitive flexibility in HI-45 mice as compared to sham-control animals. Our data indicate that both the cylinder rearing task and the two stages of the mHB are suitable behavioral approaches to differentiate consequences of neonatal mild and severe brain damage on executive functioning.
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Alternate pathways preserve tumor necrosis factor-alpha production after nuclear factor-kappaB inhibition in neonatal cerebral hypoxia-ischemia.
Stroke
PUBLISHED: 07-23-2009
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Nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) is an important regulator of inflammation and apoptosis. We showed previously that NF-kappaB inhibition by intraperitoneal TAT-NBD treatment strongly reduced neonatal hypoxic-ischemic (HI) brain damage. Neuroprotection by TAT-NBD was not associated with inhibition of cerebral cytokine production. We investigated how tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) production is maintained after NF-kappaB inhibition and whether TNF-alpha contributes to brain damage.
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Ovarian stimulation for in vitro fertilization alters the intrauterine cytokine, chemokine, and growth factor milieu encountered by the embryo.
Fertil. Steril.
PUBLISHED: 07-08-2009
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To elucidate the impact of ovarian stimulation on the intrauterine milieu represented by the cytokine, chemokine, and growth factor profile in endometrial secretions aspirated before embryo transfer.
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Inflammatory consequences of lung ischemia-reperfusion injury and low-pressure ventilation.
J. Surg. Res.
PUBLISHED: 05-30-2009
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Lung ischemia-reperfusion injury (LIRI) is a clinical problem observed during thoracic surgery, and adversely affects patient recovery. A better understanding of the mechanisms of LIRI could be helpful to develop new therapeutic strategies. The objective was to assess the inflammatory and apoptotic consequences of LIRI using an in vivo rat model.
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Deployment-related severe fatigue with depressive symptoms is associated with increased glucocorticoid binding to peripheral blood mononuclear cells.
Brain Behav. Immun.
PUBLISHED: 05-25-2009
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Severe fatigue and co-morbid depressive symptoms are frequently reported by recently deployed military personnel. Stress can induce lasting changes in the negative feedback regulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPA-axis) and the regulation of the immune system by cortisol. Since these actions of cortisol are modulated via glucocorticoid receptors (GR), we investigated the effect of deployment and of deployment-related fatigue on glucocorticoid binding to peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in a prospective design. Psychological assessments and blood sample collection took place before and one and six months after deployment. Participants were selected from a larger group and assigned to three groups based on their level of fatigue and depressive symptoms six months after deployment. We compared fatigued participants without depressive symptoms (n=21), fatigued participants with depressive symptoms (n=14) and non-fatigued participants without depressive symptoms (n=21). Fatigued participants with depressive symptoms at six months after deployment had higher glucocorticoid binding to PMBCs than the other two groups at all three time points. Notably, this difference was already present before deployment. There was no effect of deployment on glucocorticoid binding to PBMCs. The observed differences in glucocorticoid binding were not related to pre-existing group differences in psychological symptoms. No group differences were observed in the composition of the PBMC population and plasma cortisol levels. These results indicate that high glucocorticoid binding to PBMCs might represent a vulnerability factor for the development of severe fatigue with depressive symptoms after a sustained period of stress, such as deployment.
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Calcineurin inhibition in splenocytes induced by pavlovian conditioning.
FASEB J.
PUBLISHED: 05-02-2009
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Pavlovian conditioning is one of the major neurobiological mechanisms of placebo effects, potentially influencing the course of specific diseases and the response to a pharmacological therapy, such as immunosuppression. In our study with behaviorally conditioned rats, a relevant taste (0.2% saccharin) preceded the application of the immunosuppressive drug cyclosporin A (CsA), a specific calcineurin (CaN) inhibitor. Our results demonstrate that through pavlovian conditioning the particular pharmacological properties of CsA can be transferred to a neutral taste, i.e., CaN activity was inhibited in splenocytes from conditioned rats after reexposure to the gustatory stimulus. Concomitant immune consequences were observed on ex vivo mitogenic challenge (anti-CD3). Particularly, Th1-cytokine, but not Th2-cytokine, production and cell proliferation were impeded. Appropriate pharmacological and behavioral controls certify that all these changes in T-lymphocyte reactivity are attributable to mere taste reexposure. Furthermore, the underlying sympathetic-lymphocyte interaction was revealed modeling the conditioned response in vitro. CaN activity in CD4(+) T lymphocytes is reduced by beta-adrenergic stimulation (terbutaline), with these effects antagonized by the beta-adrenoreceptor antagonist nadolol. In summary, CaN was identified as the intracellular target for inducing conditioned immunosuppression by CsA, contributing to our understanding of the intracellular mechanisms behind "learned placebo effects."
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Combination of deferoxamine and erythropoietin: therapy for hypoxia-ischemia-induced brain injury in the neonatal rat?
Neurosci. Lett.
PUBLISHED: 04-10-2009
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Deferoxamine (DFO) and erythropoietin (EPO) have each been shown to provide neuroprotection in neonatal rodent models of brain injury. In view of the described anti-oxidative actions of DFO and the anti-apoptotic and anti-inflammatory effects of EPO, we hypothesized that the combination of DFO and EPO would increase neuroprotection after neonatal hypoxic-ischemic brain injury as compared to single DFO or EPO treatment. At postnatal day 7 rats underwent right common carotid artery occlusion followed by a 90-min exposure to 8% oxygen. Rats were treated intraperitoneally with DFO (200mg/kg), recombinant human EPO (1 kU/kg), a combination of DFO-EPO or vehicle at 0, 24 and 48 h after hypoxia-ischemia (HI) and were sacrificed at 72 h. DFO-EPO administration reduced the number of cleaved caspase 3-positive cells in the ipsilateral cerebral cortex. Early neuronal damage was assessed by staining for microtubuli-associated protein (MAP)-2. In our model 63+/-9% loss of ipsilateral MAP-2 was observed after HI, indicating extensive brain injury. DFO, EPO or DFO-EPO treatment did not improve neuronal integrity as defined by MAP-2. Cerebral white matter tracts were stained for myelin basic protein (MBP), a constituent of myelin. Hypoxia-ischemia strongly reduced MBP staining which suggests white matter damage. However, DFO, EPO and DFO-EPO treatment had no effect on the loss of MBP staining. Finally, HI-induced loss of striatal tyrosine hydroxylase staining was not attenuated by DFO, EPO or DFO-EPO. Although DFO-EPO treatment reduced the number of cleaved caspase 3(+) cells, treatment with DFO, EPO, or with the combination of DFO and EPO did not protect against gray or white matter damage in the experimental setting applied.
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Exogenous surfactant attenuation of ischemia-reperfusion injury in the lung through alteration of inflammatory and apoptotic factors.
J. Thorac. Cardiovasc. Surg.
PUBLISHED: 03-31-2009
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Lung ischemia-reperfusion injury is associated with impaired gas exchange from increased edema formation and surfactant inactivation. Surfactant replacement therapy is believed to improve gas exchange and lung function, but its effect on inflammation is less well understood. We therefore examined the effects of exogenous surfactant on inflammatory and apoptotic factors in the lung in a rat model of lung ischemia-reperfusion injury.
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G protein-coupled receptor kinase 6 controls post-inflammatory visceral hyperalgesia.
Brain Behav. Immun.
PUBLISHED: 02-04-2009
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Post-inflammatory pain is a poorly understood phenomenon. G protein-coupled receptors are involved in regulating pain signaling in the context of inflammation. G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRK) modulate signaling through these receptors. We investigated whether GRK6 contributes to post-inflammatory visceral hyperalgesia. Colitis was induced in female mice by 1% dextran sodium sulphate in drinking water for 7 days. Disease score, colon length, and colonic cytokines were determined. On day 49, when animals had recovered from colitis, we induced visceral pain by intracolonic capsaicin instillation. Behavioral responses to capsaicin were monitored for 20 min. Referred hyperalgesia was measured using von Frey hairs. Spinal cord c-Fos was visualized by immunohistochemistry. In contrast to our earlier observations in male GRK6-/- and wild type (WT) mice, we did not detect differences in the course of colitis or in expression of colonic cytokines between female GRK6-/- and WT mice. After recovery from colitis, capsaicin-induced behavioral pain responses and spinal cord c-Fos expression were more pronounced in female GRK6-/- than WT mice. Naive GRK6-/- and WT animals did not differ in pain and c-Fos responses to capsaicin. Capsaicin-induced referred hyperalgesia post-colitis was increased in GRK6-/- compared to WT mice. However, referred hyperalgesia post-colitis was not affected by ablation of GRK6. Furthermore, in vitro IL-1beta sensitized the capsaicin receptor TRPV1 and this process was inhibited by over-expression of GRK6. We describe the novel concept that GRK6 inhibits post-inflammatory visceral hyperalgesia but does not contribute to visceral pain in naive animals. We propose that GRK6 regulates inflammation-induced sensitization of TRPV1.
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Manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of hypoxic-ischemic brain injury in the neonatal rat.
Neuroimage
PUBLISHED: 01-14-2009
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Hypoxic-ischemic injury (HI) to the neonatal brain results in delayed neuronal death with accompanying inflammation for days after the initial insult. The aim of this study was to depict delayed neuronal death after HI using Manganese-enhanced MRI (MEMRI) and to evaluate the specificity of MEMRI in detection of cells related to injury by comparison with histology and immunohistochemistry. 7-day-old Wistar rat pups were subjected to HI (occlusion of right carotid artery and 8% O(2) for 75 min). 16 HI (HI+Mn) and 6 sham operated (Sham+Mn) pups were injected with MnCl(2) (100 mM, 40 mg/kg) and 10 HI-pups (HI+Vehicle) received NaCl i.p. 6 h after HI. 3D T(1)-weighted images (FLASH) and 2D T(2)-maps (MSME) were acquired at 7 T 1, 3 and 7 days after HI. Pups were sacrificed after MR-scanning and brain slices were cut and stained for CD68, GFAP, MAP-2, Caspase-3 and Fluorojade B. No increased manganese-enhancement (ME) was detectable in the injured hemisphere on day 1 or 3 when immunohistochemistry showed massive ongoing neuronal death. 7 days after HI, increased ME was seen on T(1)-w images in parts of the injured cortex, hippocampus and thalamus among HI+Mn pups, but not among HI+Vehicle or Sham+Mn pups. Comparison with immunohistochemistry showed delayed neuronal death and inflammation in these areas with late ME. Areas with increased ME corresponded best with areas with high concentrations of activated microglia. Thus, late manganese-enhancement seems to be related to accumulation of manganese in activated microglia in areas of neuronal death rather than depicting neuronal death per se.
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Regeneration of the ischemic brain by engineered stem cells: fuelling endogenous repair processes.
Brain Res Rev
PUBLISHED: 01-07-2009
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After ischemic brain injury various cell types including neurons, glia and endothelial cells are damaged and lose their function. Effective regeneration of brain tissue requires that all these cell types have to be replenished and combined to form a new functional network. Recent advances in regenerative medicine show the ability of stem cells to differentiate into various cell lineages. Several types of stem cells have been used to treat ischemic brain injury in rodent models including neuronal stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells and hematopoietic stem cells. Although these studies show promising results, it remains to be determined whether the beneficial effect of cell-based therapies in ischemic brain injury results from direct replacement of damaged cells by the transplanted cells. On the basis of the current literature we propose that neuroprotection by activation of anti-apoptotic mechanisms as well as improvement of the trophic milieu necessary for endogenous repair processes may be more important mechanisms underlying the improved functional outcome after stem cell treatment. Transplantation of native unmodified stem cells as such may not be sufficient to boost repair mechanisms provided by the endogenous stem cell population. An important aim of this review is to discuss the literature on the possible enhancement of regenerative function by combining stem cell transplantation with gene transduction into stem cells to enhance their regenerative and neuroprotective therapeutic potential. Finally, we briefly discuss the possibility of translation of this therapy to the clinic.
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Activation of microglial N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors triggers inflammation and neuronal cell death in the developing and mature brain.
Ann. Neurol.
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Activated microglia play a central role in the inflammatory and excitotoxic component of various acute and chronic neurological disorders. However, the mechanisms leading to their activation in the latter context are poorly understood, particularly the involvement of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs), which are critical for excitotoxicity in neurons. We hypothesized that microglia express functional NMDARs and that their activation would trigger neuronal cell death in the brain by modulating inflammation.
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Early life intervention with glucocorticoids has negative effects on motor development and neuropsychological function in 14-17 year-old adolescents.
Psychoneuroendocrinology
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To reduce the risk of bronchopulmonary dysplasia, preterm infants receive neonatal treatment with glucocorticoids, mostly dexamethasone (DEX). Compared to current protocols, treatment regimens of the late 1980s - early 1990s prescribed high doses of DEX for an extensive period up to 6 weeks. Worldwide at least one million children have been treated with this dose regimen. Previous studies have shown adverse effects of neonatal treatment with the glucocorticoid dexamethasone (DEX) on outcome in children aged 7-10 years. On the other hand, treatment with another glucocorticoid, hydrocortisone (HC), was not related to adverse effects in childhood. In the current study we determined the consequences of early life intervention with DEX or HC in adolescents (age 14-17 years). Besides motor function and intellectual capacities, we also examined fundamental neuropsychological functions which have so far received little attention.
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Hematopoietic G-protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 deficiency decreases atherosclerotic lesion formation in LDL receptor-knockout mice.
FASEB J.
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Leukocyte chemotaxis is deemed instrumental in initiation and progression of atherosclerosis. It is mediated by G-protein-coupled receptors (e.g., CCR2 and CCR5), the activity of which is controlled by G-protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs). In this study, we analyzed the effect of hematopoietic deficiency of a potent regulator kinase of chemotaxis (GRK2) on atherogenesis. LDL receptor-deficient (LDLr(-/-)) mice with heterozygous hematopoietic GRK2 deficiency, generated by bone marrow transplantation (n=15), displayed a dramatic attenuation of plaque development, with 79% reduction in necrotic core and increased macrophage content. Circulating monocytes decreased and granulocytes increased in GRK2(+/-) chimeras, which could be attributed to diminished granulocyte colony-forming units in bone marrow. Collectively, these data pointed to myeloid cells as major mediators of the impaired atherogenic response in GRK2(+/-) chimeras. LDLr(-/-) mice with macrophage/granulocyte-specific GRK2 deficiency (LysM-Cre GRK2(flox/flox); n=8) failed to mimic the aforementioned phenotype, acquitting these cells as major responsible subsets for GRK2 deficiency-associated atheroprotection. To conclude, even partial hematopoietic GRK2 deficiency prevents atherosclerotic lesion progression beyond the fatty streak stage, identifying hematopoietic GRK2 as a potential target for intervention in atherosclerosis.
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Predicting PTSD: pre-existing vulnerabilities in glucocorticoid-signaling and implications for preventive interventions.
Brain Behav. Immun.
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Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is an anxiety disorder that may develop in response to a traumatic event. Approximately 10% of trauma-exposed individuals subsequently develop PTSD. It is hypothesized that the development of PTSD is associated with biological vulnerability factors, which are already present prior to the onset of symptoms. In this review we present an overview of currently identified vulnerability factors in the glucocorticoid (GC) signaling pathway for the development of PTSD. In addition, the implications of the identified vulnerability factors for potential preventive intervention strategies, including glucocorticoid receptor (GR) agonists and oxytocin, are discussed. Summarized, the findings of these studies indicate that individuals vulnerable for development of PTSD have dysregulations on various levels of the GC-signaling cascade: i.e. low levels of circulating levels of cortisol shortly after trauma, high GR number in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), high GILZ mRNA expression and low FKBP5 expression in PBMCs prior to trauma, and high sensitivity of T-cells for regulation by GCs prior to trauma. Furthermore, single nucleotide polymorphisms in the GR and FKBP5 genes have been found to be associated with increased risk for PTSD. Collectively, the identified vulnerability factors tentatively suggest that the development of PTSD may be preceded by a high sensitivity of various cells for regulation by GCs. The identification of these vulnerability factors may ultimately aid selective targeting of preventive interventions towards individuals at risk for PTSD. In addition, the identification of these vulnerability factors may eventually result in new preventive pharmacological strategies for PTSD.
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IL-1? reactivity and the development of severe fatigue after military deployment: a longitudinal study.
J Neuroinflammation
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It has been suggested that pro-inflammatory cytokine signaling to the brain may contribute to severe fatigue. We propose that not only the level of circulating cytokines, but also increased reactivity of target cells to cytokines contributes to the effect of cytokines on behavior. Based on this concept, we assessed the reactivity of peripheral blood cells to IL-1? in vitro as a novel approach to investigate whether severe fatigue is associated with increased pro-inflammatory signaling.
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