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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Blood pressure variability and risk of dementia in an elderly cohort, the Three-City Study.
Alzheimers Dement
PUBLISHED: 11-18-2014
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The relationship between blood pressure and dementia is incompletely understood in elderly individuals. Blood pressure variability may have a role in the risk of dementia.
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Plasma lipids and cerebral small vessel disease.
Neurology
PUBLISHED: 10-15-2014
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We examined the cross-sectional association between lipid fractions and 2 MRI markers of cerebral small vessel disease, white matter hyperintensity volume (WMHV) and lacunes, representing powerful predictors of stroke and dementia.
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Older age at retirement is associated with decreased risk of dementia.
Eur. J. Epidemiol.
PUBLISHED: 04-18-2014
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To test the hypothesis that age at retirement is associated with dementia risk among self-employed workers in France, we linked health and pension databases of self-employed workers and we extracted data of those who were still alive and retired as of December 31st 2010. Dementia cases were detected in the database either through the declaration of a long-term chronic disease coded as Alzheimer's disease and other dementia (International Classification of Disease codes G30, F00, F01, F03) or through the claim for reimbursement of one of the anti-dementia drugs. Data were analyzed using Cox proportional hazard model adjusting for potential confounders. Among the 429,803 retired self-employed workers alive on December 31st 2010, prevalence of dementia was 2.65 %. Multivariable analyses showed that the hazard ratio of dementia was 0.968 [95 % confidence interval = (0.962-0.973)] per each extra year of age at retirement. After excluding workers who had dementia diagnosed within the 5 years following retirement, the results remained unchanged and highly significant (p < 0.0001). We show strong evidence of a significant decrease in the risk of developing dementia associated with older age at retirement, in line with the "use it or lose it" hypothesis. Further evidence is necessary to evaluate whether this association is causal, but our results indicate the potential importance of maintaining high levels of cognitive and social stimulation throughout work and retiree life.
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Intensity of human prion disease surveillance predicts observed disease incidence.
J. Neurol. Neurosurg. Psychiatr.
PUBLISHED: 08-21-2013
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Prospective national screening and surveillance programmes serve a range of public health functions. Objectively determining their adequacy and impact on disease may be problematic for rare disorders. We undertook to assess whether objective measures of disease surveillance intensity could be developed for the rare disorder sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) and whether such measures correlate with disease incidence.
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Trends in recognition and treatment of dementia in france analysis of the 2004 to 2010 database of the national health insurance plan.
Alzheimer Dis Assoc Disord
PUBLISHED: 08-20-2013
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Dementia is considered as underdiagnosed. We examined whether the proportion of persons aged 65 years and older who had been diagnosed as demented has changed over a 7-year period. The study population was constituted by a cohort of about 70,000 persons who were representative of the French elderly covered by the national health care insurance plan. Data about all health care consumptions were extracted from the national insurance database. Patients using an antidementia drug, having a special dementia-related coverage status, or both were identified. Annual age-standardized and sex-standardized proportions of recognized dementia cases were estimated. Between 2004 and 2010, the overall standardized proportion of persons recognized as having dementia increased slightly but significantly (P<0.004) from 3.68% to 4.20%. The proportion of persons recognized as demented increased strongly with age. In 2010, it increased from 1.44% at age 70-74 to 10% at age more than 90 in men and from 1.30% to 17.0% in women. The proportion of cholinesterase inhibitor users decreased after the age of 85 years, whereas memantine use continued to increase. Our study suggested that, in 2010, >75% of the demented persons had been recognized and received pharmacological or/and nonpharmacological therapies for dementia.
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Risk of breast cancer by individual insulin use: an international multicenter study.
Diabetes Care
PUBLISHED: 08-15-2013
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OBJECTIVE Several studies have been published in 2009 suggesting a possible association between insulin glargine and increased risk of malignancies, including breast cancer. The objective of this study was to assess the relation between the individual insulins (glargine, aspart, lispro, and human insulin) and development of breast cancer. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Seven hundred seventy-five incident cases of primary invasive or in situ carcinoma breast cancer occurring in women with diabetes from 92 centers in the U.K., Canada, and France were matched to a mean of 3.9 diabetic community control subjects (n = 3,050; recruited from 580 general practices) by country, age, recruitment date, and diabetes type and management. The main risk model was a multivariate conditional logistic regression model with case/control status as the dependent variable and individual insulin use, 8 years preceding the index date, as the independent variable, controlling for past use of any insulin, oral antidiabetes drugs, reproductive factors, lifestyle, education, hormone replacement therapy and history of contraceptive use, BMI, comorbidities, diabetes duration, and annual number of physician visits. Glargine was also compared with every other insulin by computing all ratios using the variance-covariance matrix of logistic model parameters. RESULTS Adjusted odds ratios of breast cancer for each type of insulin versus no use of that insulin were 1.04 (95% CI 0.76-1.44) for glargine, 1.23 (0.79-1.92) for lispro, 0.95 (0.64-1.40) for aspart, and 0.81 (0.55-1.20) for human insulin. Two-by-two comparisons found no difference between glargine and the different types of insulins. Insulin dosage or duration of use and tumor stage did not change the results. CONCLUSIONS This international study found no difference in the risk of developing breast cancer in patients with diabetes among the different types of insulin with short- to mid-term duration of use. Longer-term studies would be of interest.
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20-Year prevalence projections for dementia and impact of preventive policy about risk factors.
Eur. J. Epidemiol.
PUBLISHED: 05-29-2013
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Incidence of dementia increases sharply with age and, because of the increase in life expectancy, the number of dementia cases is expected to rise dramatically over time. Some studies suggest that controlling some modifiable risk factors for dementia like diabetes or hypertension could lower its incidence. However, as treating these vascular factors would also reduce mortality risk, the actual impact of such public-health intervention on dementia prevalence is not known. Accounting for the impact of dementia and risk factors on mortality, the aim of this work was (1) to compute projections of age- and-sex specific prevalence of dementia in France from 2010 to 2030, (2) to evaluate how public-health interventions targeting risk factors for dementia could change these projections. Age-and-sex specific incidence of dementia and mortality of demented subjects were estimated from the Paquid population-based cohort using a semi-parametric illness-death model. Future global mortality rates and population sizes were obtained from national demographic projections. Under the assumption that life expectancy will increase by 3.5 years for men and 2.8 years for women by 2030, the number of subjects with dementia was estimated to increase by about 75% from 2010 to 2030 with a 200% increase after 90 years of age. Therapeutic intervention on the whole population reducing high blood pressure prevalence would lead to a decrease in both dementia incidence rates and mortality and would have a modest impact on the number of dementia cases. On the other hand, a preventive dementia treatment targeting ApoE4 carriers would probably not improve survival and hence would decrease dementia prevalence by 15-25%.
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Categories of hypertension in the elderly and their 1-year evolution. The Three-City Study.
J. Hypertens.
PUBLISHED: 02-16-2013
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To assess the 1-year risk of developing sustained hypertension in untreated elderly with white-coat hypertension (WCHT) or masked hypertension (MHT), and the 1-year risk of developing uncontrolled hypertension in treated elderly with office or home uncontrolled hypertension (OUHT or HUHT).
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Gender Differences in the Association between Socioeconomic Status and Subclinical Atherosclerosis.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
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This study explored the pattern of associations between socioeconomic status (SES) and atherosclerosis progression (as indicated by carotid intima media thickness, CIMT) across gender.
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Preclinical sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in French blood donors: an epidemiologic model-based study.
Transfusion
PUBLISHED: 12-01-2011
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A recent case-control study showed that transfusion recipients were at an increased risk of developing sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD), suggesting that blood donors with silent preclinical sCJD could transmit the sCJD agent. We therefore estimated the annual number of French blood donors expected to have preclinical sCJD at the time of donation.
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Abdominal obesity and late-onset asthma: cross-sectional and longitudinal results: the 3C study.
Obesity (Silver Spring)
PUBLISHED: 10-20-2011
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Whereas global obesity assessed by BMI has been related to asthma risk, little is known as to the potential implication of abdominal adiposity in this relationship. In the elderly, in whom asthma remains poorly studied, abdominal adiposity tends to increase at the expense of muscle mass. The purpose of this study was to investigate the association between abdominal adiposity, assessed by waist circumference (WC), and prevalence and incidence of asthma in a large elderly cohort. Cross-sectional analysis was based on 7,643 participants aged ?65 years including 592 (7.7%) with lifetime physician-diagnosed asthma. Longitudinal analysis involved 6,267 baseline nonasthmatics followed-up for a period of 4 years, 67 of whom exhibited incident asthma. Baseline WC was categorized according to sex-specific criteria (men/women): <94/80 cm (reference), [94-102[/[80-88[ (abdominal overweight), and ?102/88 (abdominal obesity). Logistic and Cox regression models estimated asthma risk associated with WC after adjustment for age, sex, educational level, smoking status, BMI, physical ability, dyspnea, chronic bronchitis symptoms and history of cardiovascular disease. At baseline, asthma risk increased with increasing WC independently of BMI and other confounders (adjusted odds ratio (ORa), 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.30, 1.02-1.65 and ORa: 1.76, 1.31-2.36 for abdominal overweight and obesity, respectively). Asthma incidence was related to WC (hazard ratio (HRa), 95% CI: 2.69, 1.21-5.98 and HRa: 3.84, 1.55-9.49, for abdominal overweight and obesity, respectively). Estimates were similar in both sexes. In the elderly, abdominal adiposity was independently associated with increased prevalence and incidence of asthma. Studies aiming to understand the mechanisms involved in the adiposity-asthma link are needed.
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Guillain-Barre syndrome, influenzalike illnesses, and influenza vaccination during seasons with and without circulating A/H1N1 viruses.
Am. J. Epidemiol.
PUBLISHED: 06-07-2011
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The role of influenzalike illnesses and influenza vaccination in the development of Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS), particularly the role of A/H1N1 epidemics and A/H1N1 vaccination, is debated. Data on all incident GBS cases meeting the Brighton Collaboration criteria that were diagnosed at 25 neurology centers in France were prospectively collected between March 2007 and June 2010, covering 3 influenzavirus seasons, including the 2009-2010 A/H1N1 outbreak. A total of 457 general practitioners provided a registry of patients from which 1,080 controls were matched by age, gender, index date (calendar month), and region to 145 cases. Causal relations were assessed by multivariate case-control analysis with adjustment for risk factors (personal and family history of autoimmune disorders, among others), while matching on age, gender, and calendar time. Influenza (seasonal or A/H1N1) or influenzalike symptoms in the 2 months preceding the index date was associated with GBS, with a matched odds ratio of 2.3 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.7, 8.2). The difference in the rates of GBS occurring between influenza virus circulation periods and noncirculation periods was highly statistically significant (P = 0.004). Adjusted odds ratios for GBS occurrence within 6 weeks after seasonal and A/H1N1 vaccination were 1.3 (95% CI: 0.4, 4.1) and 0.9 (95% CI: 0.1, 7.6), respectively. Study results confirm that influenza virus is a likely risk factor for GBS. Conversely, no new concerns have arisen regarding influenza vaccination.
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Can mortality data provide reliable indicators for Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease surveillance? A study in France from 2000 to 2008.
Neuroepidemiology
PUBLISHED: 05-11-2011
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Surveillance of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) is still an important issue because of the variant CJD epidemic, which is in decline and also because of the emergence of novel forms of animal transmissible spongiform encephalopathy with zoonotic potential and the risk of nosocomial and blood transfusion-related transmission. Active surveillance has been implemented in most European countries and requires important human resources and funding. Here, we studied whether national mortality and morbidity statistics can be used as reliable indicators.
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Masked hypertension in the elderly: cross-sectional analysis of a population-based sample.
Am. J. Hypertens.
PUBLISHED: 03-17-2011
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Masked hypertension (MHT), defined as normal blood pressure (BP) at office associated with high BP at home, has been shown to be associated with an increased risk of vascular events. However, MHT is poorly known in the elderly, although this age segment is at high risk of hypertension-related vascular events. Our objectives were to assess frequency and determinants of MHT in the elderly.
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Common variants at ABCA7, MS4A6A/MS4A4E, EPHA1, CD33 and CD2AP are associated with Alzheimers disease.
Paul Hollingworth, Denise Harold, Rebecca Sims, Amy Gerrish, Jean-Charles Lambert, Minerva M Carrasquillo, Richard Abraham, Marian L Hamshere, Jaspreet Singh Pahwa, Valentina Moskvina, Kimberley Dowzell, Nicola Jones, Alexandra Stretton, Charlene Thomas, Alex Richards, Dobril Ivanov, Caroline Widdowson, Jade Chapman, Simon Lovestone, John Powell, Petroula Proitsi, Michelle K Lupton, Carol Brayne, David C Rubinsztein, Michael Gill, Brian Lawlor, Aoibhinn Lynch, Kristelle S Brown, Peter A Passmore, David Craig, Bernadette McGuinness, Stephen Todd, Clive Holmes, David Mann, A David Smith, Helen Beaumont, Donald Warden, Gordon Wilcock, Seth Love, Patrick G Kehoe, Nigel M Hooper, Emma R L C Vardy, John Hardy, Simon Mead, Nick C Fox, Martin Rossor, John Collinge, Wolfgang Maier, Frank Jessen, Eckart Rüther, Britta Schürmann, Reiner Heun, Heike Kölsch, Hendrik van den Bussche, Isabella Heuser, Johannes Kornhuber, Jens Wiltfang, Martin Dichgans, Lutz Frölich, Harald Hampel, John Gallacher, Michael Hüll, Dan Rujescu, Ina Giegling, Alison M Goate, John S K Kauwe, Carlos Cruchaga, Petra Nowotny, John C Morris, Kevin Mayo, Kristel Sleegers, Karolien Bettens, Sebastiaan Engelborghs, Peter P De Deyn, Christine Van Broeckhoven, Gill Livingston, Nicholas J Bass, Hugh Gurling, Andrew McQuillin, Rhian Gwilliam, Panagiotis Deloukas, Ammar Al-Chalabi, Christopher E Shaw, Magda Tsolaki, Andrew B Singleton, Rita Guerreiro, Thomas W Mühleisen, Markus M Nöthen, Susanne Moebus, Karl-Heinz Jöckel, Norman Klopp, H-Erich Wichmann, V Shane Pankratz, Sigrid B Sando, Jan O Aasly, Maria Barcikowska, Zbigniew K Wszolek, Dennis W Dickson, Neill R Graff-Radford, Ronald C Petersen, , Cornelia M van Duijn, Monique M B Breteler, M Arfan Ikram, Anita L Destefano, Annette L Fitzpatrick, Oscar Lopez, Lenore J Launer, Sudha Seshadri, Claudine Berr, Dominique Campion, Jacques Epelbaum, Jean-Francois Dartigues, Christophe Tzourio, Annick Alpérovitch, Mark Lathrop, Thomas M Feulner, Patricia Friedrich, Caterina Riehle, Michael Krawczak, Stefan Schreiber, Manuel Mayhaus, S Nicolhaus, Stefan Wagenpfeil, Stacy Steinberg, Hreinn Stefansson, Kari Stefansson, Jón Snaedal, Sigurbjorn Bjornsson, Palmi V Jonsson, Vincent Chouraki, Benjamin Genier-Boley, Mikko Hiltunen, Hilkka Soininen, Onofre Combarros, Diana Zelenika, Marc Delepine, María J Bullido, Florence Pasquier, Ignacio Mateo, Ana Frank-García, Elisa Porcellini, Olivier Hanon, Eliecer Coto, Victoria Alvarez, Paolo Bosco, Gabriele Siciliano, Michelangelo Mancuso, Francesco Panza, Vincenzo Solfrizzi, Benedetta Nacmias, Sandro Sorbi, Paola Bossù, Paola Piccardi, Beatrice Arosio, Giorgio Annoni, Davide Seripa, Alberto Pilotto, Elio Scarpini, Daniela Galimberti, Alexis Brice, Didier Hannequin, Federico Licastro, Lesley Jones, Peter A Holmans, Thorlakur Jonsson, Matthias Riemenschneider, Kevin Morgan, Steven G Younkin, Michael J Owen, Michael O'Donovan, Philippe Amouyel, Julie Williams.
Nat. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 03-10-2011
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We sought to identify new susceptibility loci for Alzheimers disease through a staged association study (GERAD+) and by testing suggestive loci reported by the Alzheimers Disease Genetic Consortium (ADGC) in a companion paper. We undertook a combined analysis of four genome-wide association datasets (stage 1) and identified ten newly associated variants with P ? 1 × 10(-5). We tested these variants for association in an independent sample (stage 2). Three SNPs at two loci replicated and showed evidence for association in a further sample (stage 3). Meta-analyses of all data provided compelling evidence that ABCA7 (rs3764650, meta P = 4.5 × 10(-17); including ADGC data, meta P = 5.0 × 10(-21)) and the MS4A gene cluster (rs610932, meta P = 1.8 × 10(-14); including ADGC data, meta P = 1.2 × 10(-16)) are new Alzheimers disease susceptibility loci. We also found independent evidence for association for three loci reported by the ADGC, which, when combined, showed genome-wide significance: CD2AP (GERAD+, P = 8.0 × 10(-4); including ADGC data, meta P = 8.6 × 10(-9)), CD33 (GERAD+, P = 2.2 × 10(-4); including ADGC data, meta P = 1.6 × 10(-9)) and EPHA1 (GERAD+, P = 3.4 × 10(-4); including ADGC data, meta P = 6.0 × 10(-10)).
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Incidence of ischaemic stroke according to income level among older people: the 3C study.
Age Ageing
PUBLISHED: 11-10-2010
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stroke has been shown to follow a social gradient with incidence rising as socioeconomic status decreases.
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Familial aggregation in atypical Parkinsons disease: a case control study in multiple system atrophy and progressive supranuclear palsy.
J. Neurol.
PUBLISHED: 01-20-2010
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Familial aggregation has been consistently found in PD, but it is unclear whether there is a familial aggregation in families of patients with multiple system atrophy (MSA) or progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP). MSA and PSP cases were recruited from a two-arm case control study. One control was matched to each case for age, gender and living area. Medical history of first-degree relatives was obtained through a face-to-face questionnaire. Age-specific cumulative incidence of Parkinsonism and dementia in first-degree relatives of cases and controls was compared for MSA and PSP separately. Seventy-one pairs for MSA and their controls and 79 pairs for PSP and their controls were included. No significant familial aggregation was found in PSP. MSA cases reported Parkinsonism more often, but not dementia in their first-degree relatives than controls. MSA patients, but not those with PSP, have Parkinsonism more often in their first-degree relatives than controls.
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Slow walking speed and cardiovascular death in well functioning older adults: prospective cohort study.
BMJ
PUBLISHED: 11-12-2009
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To study the relation between low walking speed and the risk of death in older people, both overall and with regard to the main causes of death.
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Professional exposure to pesticides and Parkinson disease.
Ann. Neurol.
PUBLISHED: 10-23-2009
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We studied the relation between Parkinson disease (PD) and professional exposure to pesticides in a community-based case-control study conducted in a population characterized by a high prevalence of exposure. Our objective was to investigate the role of specific pesticide families and to perform dose-effect analyses.
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Apolipoprotein E genotype is related to progression of white matter lesion load.
Stroke
PUBLISHED: 07-30-2009
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The relationship between white matter lesions (WMLs) and the apolipoprotein E genotype has been controversial from cross-sectional studies and no longitudinal finding has been reported. We investigated whether the apolipoprotein E genotype influences baseline and evolution over 4-year follow-up of WML volumes in a population-based sample of 1779 nondemented subjects aged 65 to 80 years old at enrollment.
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A cross-sectional and longitudinal study of the relationship between walking speed and cognitive function in community-dwelling elderly people.
J. Gerontol. A Biol. Sci. Med. Sci.
PUBLISHED: 06-26-2009
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Previous reports have shown links between cognitive function and physical performance in the elderly people, but it is unclear whether some specific cognitive domains are more strongly associated with measures of physical function such as walking speed. We investigated cross-sectional and longitudinal relationships between performance in five cognitive tests and walking speed among community-dwelling elderly people in the Dijon center (France) of the Three-City Study.
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Do we really know the cause of death of the very old? Comparison between official mortality statistics and cohort study classification.
Eur. J. Epidemiol.
PUBLISHED: 06-10-2009
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Causes of death of 625 subjects who died during the 4-year follow-up of a large population-based elderly cohort (Three-City study) were independently classified by the study adjudication committee and the national mortality register. The former used all available data about the cause of death (hospital records, medical data obtained from family physicians or specialists, and proxy interviews) and the latter used internationally standardized recommendations for processing death certificate data. Comparison showed a moderate overall agreement for underlying cause of death between the study adjudication committee and the national register (kappa = 0.51). Differences were found especially for cardiovascular diseases (20.6% of deaths from the study committee vs. 32.5% from the national register) and ill-defined causes of death (22.7 vs. 4%). The proportion of disagreement increased in participants dying at age >85 compared to those dying at age < or =70 (adjusted odds ratio = 2.46, 95% confidence interval = 1.10-5.49). It was also higher when the study committee used hospital record data for defining cause of death, compared to adjudication based on data obtained from proxy (adjusted odds ratio = 1.85, 95% CI = 1.09-3.14). These findings raise questions about the validity of national mortality registers in very old persons. Disease-specific causes of death, especially vascular diseases, could be overestimated in this age group.
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Cerebral white matter lesions are associated with the risk of stroke but not with other vascular events: the 3-City Dijon Study.
Stroke
PUBLISHED: 05-14-2009
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White matter lesions (WMLs) have been shown to be associated with the risk of stroke in previous studies but little is known about the prediction of other vascular events. We evaluated the risk of stroke and other vascular events according to WML volume in a large population-based sample. We also studied WML volume by type (deep or periventricular) in relation to these events.
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Genome-wide association study identifies variants at CLU and CR1 associated with Alzheimers disease.
Nat. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 05-12-2009
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The gene encoding apolipoprotein E (APOE) on chromosome 19 is the only confirmed susceptibility locus for late-onset Alzheimers disease. To identify other risk loci, we conducted a large genome-wide association study of 2,032 individuals from France with Alzheimers disease (cases) and 5,328 controls. Markers outside APOE with suggestive evidence of association (P < 10(-5)) were examined in collections from Belgium, Finland, Italy and Spain totaling 3,978 Alzheimers disease cases and 3,297 controls. Two loci gave replicated evidence of association: one within CLU (also called APOJ), encoding clusterin or apolipoprotein J, on chromosome 8 (rs11136000, OR = 0.86, 95% CI 0.81-0.90, P = 7.5 x 10(-9) for combined data) and the other within CR1, encoding the complement component (3b/4b) receptor 1, on chromosome 1 (rs6656401, OR = 1.21, 95% CI 1.14-1.29, P = 3.7 x 10(-9) for combined data). Previous biological studies support roles of CLU and CR1 in the clearance of beta amyloid (Abeta) peptide, the principal constituent of amyloid plaques, which are one of the major brain lesions of individuals with Alzheimers disease.
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Variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in France and the United Kingdom: Evidence for the same agent strain.
Ann. Neurol.
PUBLISHED: 04-01-2009
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Variant Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (vCJD) was first reported in the United Kingdom in 1996. Since then, the majority of cases have been observed in the United Kingdom where there was a major epidemic of bovine spongiform encephalopathy. France was the second country affected. To address the hypothesis of the involvement of a common strain of agent, we have compared clinical, neuropathological, and biochemical data on vCJD patients from both countries.
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Association of white-matter lesions with brain atrophy markers: the three-city Dijon MRI study.
Cerebrovasc. Dis.
PUBLISHED: 03-27-2009
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Brain atrophy and white-matter lesions (WML) are common features at cerebral MRI of both normal and demented elderly people. In a population-based study of 1,792 elderly subjects aged 65-80 years, free of dementia, who had a cerebral MRI at entry, we investigated the relationship between WML volume and brain atrophy markers estimated by hippocampal, gray matter (GM) and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) volumes.
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Framingham stroke risk function in a large population-based cohort of elderly people: the 3C study.
Stroke
PUBLISHED: 03-12-2009
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External validation of the Framingham stroke risk function has been rarely performed. We assessed its predictive ability in a population-based cohort of French elderly.
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Inappropriate medication use and risk of falls--a prospective study in a large community-dwelling elderly cohort.
BMC Geriatr
PUBLISHED: 02-12-2009
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Explicit criteria for determining potentially inappropriate medication consumption in elderly were elaborated by Beers et al. These lists have been used worldwide to evaluate medical prescriptions but there is little epidemiologic evidence demonstrating negative consequences of inappropriate medication use. It has been reported that some drugs could increase the risk of falls, which are a frequent and serious problem in elderly population. We aimed to evaluate the association between the use of potentially inappropriate medications and the risk of falls.
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Metabolic syndrome and risk for incident Alzheimers disease or vascular dementia: the Three-City Study.
Diabetes Care
PUBLISHED: 02-04-2009
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Associations between metabolic syndrome and its individual components with risk of incident dementia and its different subtypes are inconsistent.
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Relationship between blood pressure and outdoor temperature in a large sample of elderly individuals: the Three-City study.
Arch. Intern. Med.
PUBLISHED: 01-14-2009
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Seasonal variations of blood pressure-related diseases have been described in several populations. However, few studies have examined the seasonal variations of blood pressure in the elderly, a segment of the population particularly exposed to vascular diseases. The association of blood pressure with season and outdoor temperature was examined in 8801 subjects 65 years or older from the Three-City study, a population-based longitudinal study.
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Feasibility of home blood pressure measurement in elderly individuals: cross-sectional analysis of a population-based sample.
Am. J. Hypertens.
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Home blood pressure measurement (HBPM) is recommended by hypertension guidelines, particularly in the elderly. However, feasibility of HBPM in this age group has not been fully established. Our objective was therefore to assess HBPM feasibility in elderly individuals of the general population.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.