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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Reduced amygdala and ventral striatal activity to happy faces in PTSD is associated with emotional numbing.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 09-03-2014
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There has been a growing recognition of the importance of reward processing in PTSD, yet little is known of the underlying neural networks. This study tested the predictions that (1) individuals with PTSD would display reduced responses to happy facial expressions in ventral striatal reward networks, and (2) that this reduction would be associated with emotional numbing symptoms. 23 treatment-seeking patients with Posttraumatic Stress Disorder were recruited from the treatment clinic at the Centre for Traumatic Stress Studies, Westmead Hospital, and 20 trauma-exposed controls were recruited from a community sample. We examined functional magnetic resonance imaging responses during the presentation of happy and neutral facial expressions in a passive viewing task. PTSD participants rated happy facial expression as less intense than trauma-exposed controls. Relative to controls, PTSD participants revealed lower activation to happy (-neutral) faces in ventral striatum and and a trend for reduced activation in left amygdala. A significant negative correlation was found between emotional numbing symptoms in PTSD and right ventral striatal regions after controlling for depression, anxiety and PTSD severity. This study provides initial evidence that individuals with PTSD have lower reactivity to happy facial expressions, and that lower activation in ventral striatal-limbic reward networks may be associated with symptoms of emotional numbing.
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Chronic effects of dietary vitamin D deficiency without increased calcium supplementation on the progression of experimental polycystic kidney disease.
Am. J. Physiol. Renal Physiol.
PUBLISHED: 05-22-2013
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Increasing evidence indicates that vitamin D deficiency exacerbates chronic kidney injury, but its effects on renal enlargement in polycystic kidney disease (PKD) are not known. In this study, male Lewis polycystic kidney disease (LPK) rats received a normal diet (ND; AIN-93G) supplemented with or without cholecalciferol (vitamin D-deficient diet, VDD; both 0.5% calcium), commenced at either postnatal week 3 (until weeks 10-20; study 1) or from week 10 (until week 20; study 2). Levels of 25-hydroxy vitamin D were reduced in groups receiving the VDD (12 ± 1 nmol/l vs. 116 ± 5 in ND; P < 0.001). In study 1, food intake and weight gain increased by ?25% in LPK rats receiving the VDD ad libitum, and at week 20 this was associated with a mild reduction in the corrected serum calcium (SCa(2+), 7.4%) and TKW:BW ratio (8.8%), and exacerbation of proteinuria (87%) and hypertension (19%; all P < 0.05 vs. ND). When LPK rats were pair-fed for weeks 3-10, there was a further reduction in the SCa(2+) (25%) and TKW:BW ratio (22%) in the VDD group (P < 0.05 vs. ND). In study 2, the VDD did not alter food intake and body weight, reduced SCa(2+) (7.7%), worsened proteinuria (41.9%), interstitial monocyte accumulation (26.4%), renal dysfunction (21.4%), and cardiac enlargement (13.2%, all P < 0.05), but there was a trend for a reduction in the TKW:BW ratio (13%, P = 0.09). These data suggest that chronic vitamin D deficiency has adverse long-term actions on proteinuria, interstitial inflammation, renal function, and cardiovascular disease in PKD, and these negate its mild inhibitory effect on kidney enlargement.
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Imaging of ankle tendinopathy and tears.
Top Magn Reson Imaging
PUBLISHED: 09-02-2010
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The major muscular prime movers and stabilizers of the foot and ankle originate in the mid to lower leg and send their tendons distally. Most of these tendons, with the exception of the Achilles and plantaris tendons, must negotiate a sharply curved course at the ankle and are stabilized by fibro-osseous tunnels, pulleys, or fibrous retinaculi before eventually inserting at the foot. Knowledge of specific tendon anatomy, contact points and sites of physical and vascular stress, helps to identify those regions susceptible to degeneration or tearing and to optimize the design of imaging protocols. This review covers the imaging modalities used to assess tendons about the ankle and issues related to their usage, normal tendon structure and relevant anatomy, normal imaging appearances and artifacts, and the common degenerative pathological processes which imaging can show.
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Neural responses to masked fear faces: sex differences and trauma exposure in posttraumatic stress disorder.
J Abnorm Psychol
PUBLISHED: 02-10-2010
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Although women have a greater propensity than men to develop posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) following trauma, sex differences in neural activations to threat have received little investigation. This study tested the prediction that trauma would heighten activity in automatic fear-processing networks to a greater extent in women than in men. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data were recorded in 23 participants with PTSD (13 women, 10 men), 21 trauma-exposed controls (9 women, 12 men), and 42 non-trauma-exposed controls (22 women, 20 men) while they viewed masked facial expressions of fear. Exposure to trauma was associated with enhanced brainstem activity to fear in women, regardless of the presence of PTSD, but in men, it was associated only with the development of PTSD. Men with PTSD displayed greater hippocampal activity to fear than did women. Both men and women with PTSD showed enhanced amygdala activity to fear relative to controls. The authors conclude that greater brainstem activation to threat stimuli may contribute to the greater prevalence of PTSD in women, and greater hippocampal activation in men may subserve an enhanced capacity for contextualizing fear-related stimuli.
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Opinion: integration of diagnostic and management perspectives for placenta accreta.
Aust N Z J Obstet Gynaecol
PUBLISHED: 12-15-2009
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The 2007 New South Wales/Queensland Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists Annual Scientific Meeting convened a panel to discuss multidisciplinary perspectives on the management of placenta accreta, percreta or increta. While it was anticipated that this panel would stimulate discussion, the cohesion between the approaches was underestimated. This document represents an integration of the perspectives of the invited speakers at this presentation, with backgrounds in maternal-fetal medicine, gynaecological oncology, radiology and general obstetrics and gynaecology.
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Duration of posttraumatic stress disorder predicts hippocampal grey matter loss.
Neuroreport
PUBLISHED: 10-02-2009
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To examine the impact of environmental stress on grey matter volume in posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), we investigated the relationship between duration of PTSD and grey matter volume of hippocampus and anterior cingulate cortex. Twenty-one participants with PTSD and 17 trauma-exposed controls, matched for age and sex and with no history of substance dependence, underwent a T1-weighted structural MRI scan and voxel-based morphometry was employed. After controlling for age, depression and whole-brain volume, analysis of covariance revealed significant reductions in hippocampus and rostral anterior cingulate cortex in PTSD, and there was a significant negative correlation between right hippocampal volume and PTSD duration. This pattern suggests that prolonged PTSD may have cumulative adverse effects on hippocampal volume, highlighting the potential role of genetic-environmental interactions.
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Fibulotalocalcaneal ligament: magnetic resonance imaging findings with cadaver correlation.
J Comput Assist Tomogr
PUBLISHED: 05-30-2009
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The objectives of this study were to determine whether the fibulotalocalcaneal (FTC) ligament of the ankle, described in anatomical literature, can be identified on magnetic resonance (MR) imaging studies.
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Negativity bias in risk for depression and anxiety: brain-body fear circuitry correlates, 5-HTT-LPR and early life stress.
Neuroimage
PUBLISHED: 02-05-2009
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The INTEGRATE Model draws on the framework of integrative neuroscience to bring together brain-body and behavioral concepts of emotion, thinking and feeling and their regulation. The key organizing principle is the drive to minimize danger and maximize reward that determines what is significant to us at each point in time. Traits of negativity bias reflect the tendency to perceive danger rather than reward related information, and this bias influences emotion, thinking and feeling processes. Here, we examined a self-report measure of Negativity Bias in relation to its impact on brain and body correlates of emotion processing. The contributions of the serotonin transporter (5-HTT-LPR) allelic variants and early life stress to both negativity bias and these correlates were also examined. Data were accessed in collaboration with the Brain Resource International Database (BRID) which provides standardized data across these domains of measurement. From an initial sample of 303 nonclinical subjects from the BRID, subjects scoring one standard deviation below (n=55) and above (n=47) the mean on the measure of negativity bias were identified as Negativity Bias and Positivity Bias groups for analysis, respectively. These subjects had been genotyped for 5-HTT-LPR Short allele versus LL homozygote status, and completed the early life stress scale, and recording of startle responses and heart rate for conscious and nonconscious fear conditions. A matched subset (n=39) of BRID subjects completed functional MRI with the same facial emotion tasks. The Negativity Bias (compared to Positivity Bias) group was distinguished by both arousal and brain function correlates: higher startle amplitude, higher heart rate for conscious and nonconscious fear conditions, and heightened activation in neural circuitry for both fear conditions. Regions of heightened activation included brainstem and bilateral amygdala, anterior cingulate and ventral and dorsal medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) for conscious fear, and brainstem and right-sided amygdala, anterior cingulate and ventral, mPFC for nonconscious fear. The 5-HTT-LPR Short allele (versus LL) conferred a similar pattern of arousal and neural activation. For those with the 5-HTT-LPR Short allele, the addition of early life stress contributed to enhanced negativity bias, and to further effects on heart rate and neural activation for nonconscious fear in particular. These findings suggest that traits of negativity bias impact brain-body arousal correlates of fear circuitry. Both genetic variation and life stressors contribute to the impact of negativity bias. Given that negativity bias is a feature of conditions such as depression and associated biological alterations, the findings have implications for translation into clinical decision support.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.