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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Helical nanostructures based on DNA self-assembly.
Nanoscale
PUBLISHED: 04-16-2014
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Recent advances in design and fabrication of helical nanostructures based on DNA self-assembly are reviewed. These helical nanostructures are either constructed entirely by DNA or based on DNA guided metal nanoparticles self-assembly. Biophysical properties and optical responses of corresponding helical nanostructures are also discussed.
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Single molecule characterization of DNA binding and strand displacement reactions on lithographic DNA origami microarrays.
Nano Lett.
PUBLISHED: 02-12-2014
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The combination of molecular self-assembly based on the DNA origami technique with lithographic patterning enables the creation of hierarchically ordered nanosystems, in which single molecules are positioned at precise locations on multiple length scales. Based on a hybrid assembly protocol utilizing DNA self-assembly and electron-beam lithography on transparent glass substrates, we here demonstrate a DNA origami microarray, which is compatible with the requirements of single molecule fluorescence and super-resolution microscopy. The spatial arrangement allows for a simple and reliable identification of single molecule events and facilitates automated read-out and data analysis. As a specific application, we utilize the microarray to characterize the performance of DNA strand displacement reactions localized on the DNA origami structures. We find considerable variability within the array, which results both from structural variations and stochastic reaction dynamics prevalent at the single molecule level.
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Reconfigurable 3D plasmonic metamolecules.
Nat Mater
PUBLISHED: 01-21-2014
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A reconfigurable plasmonic nanosystem combines an active plasmonic structure with a regulated physical or chemical control input. There have been considerable efforts on integration of plasmonic nanostructures with active platforms using top-down techniques. The active media include phase-transition materials, graphene, liquid crystals and carrier-modulated semiconductors, which can respond to thermal, electrical and optical stimuli. However, these plasmonic nanostructures are often restricted to two-dimensional substrates, showing desired optical response only along specific excitation directions. Alternatively, bottom-up techniques offer a new pathway to impart reconfigurability and functionality to passive systems. In particular, DNA has proven to be one of the most versatile and robust building blocks for construction of complex three-dimensional architectures with high fidelity. Here we show the creation of reconfigurable three-dimensional plasmonic metamolecules, which execute DNA-regulated conformational changes at the nanoscale. DNA serves as both a construction material to organize plasmonic nanoparticles in three dimensions, as well as fuel for driving the metamolecules to distinct conformational states. Simultaneously, the three-dimensional plasmonic metamolecules can work as optical reporters, which transduce their conformational changes in situ into circular dichroism changes in the visible wavelength range.
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3D plasmonic chiral colloids.
Nanoscale
PUBLISHED: 01-03-2014
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3D plasmonic chiral colloids are synthesized through deterministically grouping of two gold nanorod AuNRs on DNA origami. These nanorod crosses exhibit strong circular dichroism (CD) at optical frequencies which can be engineered through position tuning of the rods on the origami. Our experimental results agree qualitatively well with theoretical predictions.
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Chiral plasmonic DNA nanostructures with switchable circular dichroism.
Nat Commun
PUBLISHED: 08-07-2013
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Circular dichroism spectra of naturally occurring molecules and also of synthetic chiral arrangements of plasmonic particles often exhibit characteristic bisignate shapes. Such spectra consist of peaks next to dips (or vice versa) and result from the superposition of signals originating from many individual chiral objects oriented randomly in solution. Here we show that by first aligning and then toggling the orientation of DNA-origami-scaffolded nanoparticle helices attached to a substrate, we are able to reversibly switch the optical response between two distinct circular dichroism spectra corresponding to either perpendicular or parallel helix orientation with respect to the light beam. The observed directional circular dichroism of our switchable plasmonic material is in good agreement with predictions based on dipole approximation theory. Such dynamic metamaterials introduce functionality into soft matter-based optical devices and may enable novel data storage schemes or signal modulators.
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Trapping and immobilization of DNA molecules between nanoelectrodes.
Methods Mol. Biol.
PUBLISHED: 06-16-2011
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DNA is one of the most promising molecules for nanoscale bottom-up fabrication. For both scientific studies and fabrication of devices, it is desirable to be able to manipulate DNA molecules, or self--assembled DNA constructions, at the single unit level. Efficient methods are needed for precisely attaching the single unit to the external measurement setup or the device structure. So far, this has often been too cumbersome to achieve, and consequently most of the scientific studies are based on a statistical analysis or measurements done for a sample containing numerous molecules in liquid or in a dry state. Here, we explain a method for trapping and attaching nanoscale double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) molecules between nanoelectrodes. The method is based on dielectrophoresis and gives a high yield of trapping only single or a few molecules, which enables, for example, transport measurements at the single -molecule level. The method has been used to trap different dsDNA fragments, sizes varying from 27 to 8,416 bp, and also DNA origami constructions. We also explain how confocal microscopy can be used to determine and optimize the trapping parameters.
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DNA origami-based nanoribbons: assembly, length distribution, and twist.
Nanotechnology
PUBLISHED: 05-20-2011
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A variety of polymerization methods for the assembly of elongated nanoribbons from rectangular DNA origami structures are investigated. The most efficient method utilizes single-stranded DNA oligonucleotides to bridge an intermolecular scaffold seam between origami monomers. This approach allows the fabrication of origami ribbons with lengths of several micrometers, which can be used for long-range ordered arrangement of proteins. It is quantitatively shown that the length distribution of origami ribbons obtained with this technique follows the theoretical prediction for a simple linear polymerization reaction. The design of flat single layer origami structures with constant crossover spacing inevitably results in local underwinding of the DNA helix, which leads to a global twist of the origami structures that also translates to the nanoribbons.
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Dielectrophoresis at the nanoscale.
Electrophoresis
PUBLISHED: 01-15-2011
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Dielectrophoresis has become a powerful tool for manipulation of various materials, such as metal and semiconducting particles, DNA molecules, nanowires and graphene. This short review is intended to provide the reader with an overview of the recent advances of application of dielectrophoresis at the nanoscale.
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Single-molecule kinetics and super-resolution microscopy by fluorescence imaging of transient binding on DNA origami.
Nano Lett.
PUBLISHED: 10-21-2010
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DNA origami is a powerful method for the programmable assembly of nanoscale molecular structures. For applications of these structures as functional biomaterials, the study of reaction kinetics and dynamic processes in real time and with high spatial resolution becomes increasingly important. We present a single-molecule assay for the study of binding and unbinding kinetics on DNA origami. We find that the kinetics of hybridization to single-stranded extensions on DNA origami is similar to isolated substrate-immobilized DNA with a slight position dependence on the origami. On the basis of the knowledge of the kinetics, we exploit reversible specific binding of labeled oligonucleotides to DNA nanostructures for PAINT (points accumulation for imaging in nanoscale topography) imaging with <30 nm resolution. The method is demonstrated for flat monomeric DNA structures as well as multimeric, ribbon-like DNA structures.
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DNA origami as a nanoscale template for protein assembly.
Nanotechnology
PUBLISHED: 05-18-2009
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We describe two general approaches to the utilization of DNA origami structures for the assembly of materials. In one approach, DNA origami is used as a prefabricated template for subsequent assembly of materials. In the other, materials are assembled simultaneously with the DNA origami, i.e. the DNA origami technique is used to drive the assembly of materials. Fabrication of complex protein structures is demonstrated by these two approaches. The latter approach has the potential to be extended to the assembly of multiple materials with single attachment chemistry.
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Controlling the formation of DNA origami structures with external signals.
Small
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Degradable Newkome-type and polylysine dendrons functionalized with spermine surface units are used to control the formation of DNA origami structures. The intact dendrons form polyelectrolyte complexes with the scaffold strands, therefore blocking the origami formation. Degradation of the dendron with an optical trigger or chemical reduction leads to the release of the DNA scaffold and efficient formation of the desired origami structure. These results provide new insights towards realizing responsive materials with DNA origami.
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Distance dependence of single-fluorophore quenching by gold nanoparticles studied on DNA origami.
ACS Nano
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We study the distance-dependent quenching of fluorescence due to a metallic nanoparticle in proximity of a fluorophore. In our single-molecule measurements, we achieve excellent control over structure and stoichiometry by using self-assembled DNA structures (DNA origami) as a breadboard where both the fluorophore and the 10 nm metallic nanoparticle are positioned with nanometer precision. The single-molecule spectroscopy method employed here reports on the co-localization of particle and dye, while fluorescence lifetime imaging is used to directly obtain the correlation of intensity and fluorescence lifetime for varying particle to dye distances. Our data can be well explained by exact calculations that include dipole-dipole orientation and distances. Fitting with a more practical model for nanosurface energy transfer yields 10.4 nm as the characteristic distance of 50% energy transfer. The use of DNA nanotechnology together with minimal sample usage by attaching the particles to the DNA origami directly on the microscope coverslip paves the way for more complex experiments exploiting dye-nanoparticle interactions.
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DNA-based self-assembly of chiral plasmonic nanostructures with tailored optical response.
Nature
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Matter structured on a length scale comparable to or smaller than the wavelength of light can exhibit unusual optical properties. Particularly promising components for such materials are metal nanostructures, where structural alterations provide a straightforward means of tailoring their surface plasmon resonances and hence their interaction with light. But the top-down fabrication of plasmonic materials with controlled optical responses in the visible spectral range remains challenging, because lithographic methods are limited in resolution and in their ability to generate genuinely three-dimensional architectures. Molecular self-assembly provides an alternative bottom-up fabrication route not restricted by these limitations, and DNA- and peptide-directed assembly have proved to be viable methods for the controlled arrangement of metal nanoparticles in complex and also chiral geometries. Here we show that DNA origami enables the high-yield production of plasmonic structures that contain nanoparticles arranged in nanometre-scale helices. We find, in agreement with theoretical predictions, that the structures in solution exhibit defined circular dichroism and optical rotatory dispersion effects at visible wavelengths that originate from the collective plasmon-plasmon interactions of the nanoparticles positioned with an accuracy better than two nanometres. Circular dichroism effects in the visible part of the spectrum have been achieved by exploiting the chiral morphology of organic molecules and the plasmonic properties of nanoparticles, or even without precise control over the spatial configuration of the nanoparticles. In contrast, the optical response of our nanoparticle assemblies is rationally designed and tunable in handedness, colour and intensity-in accordance with our theoretical model.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.