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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Restoration of CFTR function in patients with cystic fibrosis carrying the F508del-CFTR mutation.
Autophagy
PUBLISHED: 10-29-2014
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Restoration of BECN1/Beclin 1-dependent autophagy and depletion of SQSTM1/p62 by genetic manipulation or autophagy-stimulatory proteostasis regulators, such as cystamine, have positive effects on mouse models of human cystic fibrosis (CF). These measures rescue the functional expression of the most frequent pathogenic CFTR mutant, F508del, at the respiratory epithelial surface and reduce lung inflammation in Cftr(F508del) homozygous mice. Cysteamine, the reduced form of cystamine, is an FDA-approved drug. Here, we report that oral treatment with cysteamine greatly reduces the mortality rate and improves the phenotype of newborn mice bearing the F508del-CFTR mutation. Cysteamine was also able to increase the plasma membrane expression of the F508del-CFTR protein in nasal epithelial cells from F508del homozygous CF patients, and these effects persisted for 24 h after cysteamine withdrawal. Importantly, this cysteamine effect after washout was further sustained by the sequential administration of epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), a green tea flavonoid, both in vivo, in mice, and in vitro, in primary epithelial cells from CF patients. In a pilot clinical trial involving 10 F508del-CFTR homozygous CF patients, the combination of cysteamine and EGCG restored BECN1, reduced SQSTM1 levels and improved CFTR function from nasal epithelial cells in vivo, correlating with a decrease of chloride concentrations in sweat, as well as with a reduction of the abundance of TNF/TNF-alpha (tumor necrosis factor) and CXCL8 (chemokine [C-X-C motif] ligand 8) transcripts in nasal brushing and TNF and CXCL8 protein levels in the sputum. Altogether, these results suggest that optimal schedules of cysteamine plus EGCG might be used for the treatment of CF caused by the F508del-CFTR mutation.
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Potential celiac children: 9-year follow-up on a gluten-containing diet.
Am. J. Gastroenterol.
PUBLISHED: 02-28-2014
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Potential celiac disease (CD) is defined by the presence of serum anti-tissue-transglutaminase (anti-TG2) antibodies and normal duodenal mucosa. The major clinical problem is the management of asymptomatic patients and how to predict the development of villous atrophy. This prospective longitudinal cohort study describes the natural history of potential CD up to 9 years and explores risk factors associated with the development of mucosal damage.
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Potential celiac patients: a model of celiac disease pathogenesis.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 03-23-2011
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Potential celiacs have the celiac type HLA, positive anti-transglutaminase antibodies but no damage at small intestinal mucosa. Only a minority of them develops mucosal lesion. More than 40 genes were associated to Celiac Disease (CD) but we still do not know how those pathways transform a genetically predisposed individual into an affected person. The aim of the study is to explore the genetic features of Potential CD individuals.
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Intestinal deposits of anti-tissue transglutaminase IgA in childhood celiac disease.
Dig Liver Dis
PUBLISHED: 01-05-2011
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High serum levels of anti-tissue-transglutaminase-2 IgA antibodies (anti-TG2), which are produced and deposited in the intestine, characterize celiac disease.
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Natural history of potential celiac disease in children.
Clin. Gastroenterol. Hepatol.
PUBLISHED: 05-13-2010
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The presence of celiac disease-associated autoantibodies (antiendomysium and antitissue transglutaminase [anti-TG2]) with normal jejunal mucosa indicate potential celiac disease. We performed a prospective, 3-year cohort study to determine the natural history of potential celiac disease in children.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.