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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Sexual Quality of Life in Gender-Dysphoric Adults before Genital Sex Reassignment Surgery.
J Sex Med
PUBLISHED: 11-18-2014
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Although there is literature on sexuality in gender dysphoria, few studies have been done prior to genital sex reassignment surgery (SRS).
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Association Study of ER?, AR, and CYP19A1 Genes and MtF Transsexualism.
J Sex Med
PUBLISHED: 08-15-2014
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The etiology of male-to-female (MtF) transsexualism is unknown. Both genetic and neurological factors may play an important role.
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Effects of cross-sex hormone treatment on cortical thickness in transsexual individuals.
J Sex Med
PUBLISHED: 03-11-2014
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Untreated transsexuals have a brain cortical phenotype. Cross-sex hormone treatments are used to masculinize or feminize the bodies of female-to-male (FtMs) or male-to-female (MtFs) transsexuals, respectively.
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The (CA)n Polymorphism of ER? Gene is Associated with FtM Transsexualism.
J Sex Med
PUBLISHED: 11-26-2013
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Transsexualism is a gender identity disorder with a multifactorial etiology. Neurodevelopmental processes and genetic factors seem to be implicated.
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Determinants of quality of life in Spanish transsexuals attending a gender unit before genital sex reassignment surgery.
Qual Life Res
PUBLISHED: 07-31-2013
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To evaluate the self-reported perceived quality of life (QoL) in transsexuals attending a Spanish gender identity unit before genital sex reassignment surgery, and to identify possible determinants that likely contribute to their QoL.
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Temperament and character in transsexuals.
Psychiatry Res
PUBLISHED: 01-16-2013
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The aim of this study was to evaluate personality in transsexuals. The Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI) profiles of 166 male-to-female (MF) and 88 female-to-male (FM) transsexuals were compared with those of a control group of males and females. MF and FM transsexuals scored significantly lower than males and females in RD4 (more independent) and C3 (more self-centeredness). MF transsexuals scored higher than males and females in HA4 (more fatigable), ST and ST3 (more spiritual acceptance), and lower in C5 (more opportunistic); moreover, they showed higher scores than males in RD1 (more sentimental) and lower than females in C (less cooperativeness). FM transsexuals scored lower than females in HA2 (more daring and confident), RD (less sentimental), and C5 (more opportunistic). Compared with FM, MF transsexuals scored higher on HA2 (more fearful), RD, RD1 (more sentimental), ST, ST2 and ST3 (more spiritual). All these differences were less than half a standard deviation except for C3. Data show that transsexuals and controls display a similar personality profile, even though there are some differential personality traits. Moreover, the personality profile of transsexuals was closer to the profile of subjects who shared their gender identity than those who shared their anatomical sex.
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Hormone-treated transsexuals report less social distress, anxiety and depression.
Psychoneuroendocrinology
PUBLISHED: 06-27-2011
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The aim of the present study was to evaluate the presence of symptoms of current social distress, anxiety and depression in transsexuals.
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The microstructure of white matter in male to female transsexuals before cross-sex hormonal treatment. A DTI study.
J Psychiatr Res
PUBLISHED: 09-03-2010
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Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) has been shown to be sensitive in detecting white matter differences between sexes. Before cross-sex hormone treatment female to male transsexuals (FtM) differ from females but not from males in several brain fibers. The purpose of this paper is to investigate whether white matter patterns in male to female (MtF) transsexuals before commencing cross-sex hormone treatment are also more similar to those of their biological sex or whether they are more similar to those of their gender identity.
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White matter microstructure in female to male transsexuals before cross-sex hormonal treatment. A diffusion tensor imaging study.
J Psychiatr Res
PUBLISHED: 03-04-2010
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Some gray and white matter regions of the brain are sexually dimorphic. The best MRI technique for identifying subtle differences in white matter is diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). The purpose of this paper is to investigate whether white matter patterns in female to male (FtM) transsexuals before commencing cross-sex hormone treatment are more similar to that of their biological sex or to that of their gender identity.
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Birth order and ratio of brothers to sisters in Spanish transsexuals.
Arch Sex Behav
PUBLISHED: 02-13-2010
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Three Western studies have shown that male-to-female (MF) homosexual transsexuals tend to be born later than their siblings and to come from sibships with more brothers than sisters. The objective of this study was to determine whether these variables would be replicated in 530 MF and female-to-male (FM) Spanish transsexuals according to sexual orientation. The results showed that MF homosexual transsexuals had significantly more older brothers than the non-homosexual MF group. Compared with the expected rates in the general population, birth order was significantly higher in both MF (Slaters Index = 0.59; Fraternal Index = 0.61; Sororal Index = 0.58) and FM homosexual transsexuals (Slaters Index = 0.65; Fraternal Index = 0.68; Sororal Index = 0.67), and sibling sex ratio was significantly higher than expected in homosexual MF (sex ratio = 0.55) but not in homosexual FM transsexuals. No significant differences were found in the non-homosexual subgroups. The replication of the later birth order and sibling sex-ratio effect in MF homosexual transsexuals corroborates previous findings in a variety of groups from different cultures and may suggest a common mechanism underlying the etiology of transsexualism.
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Cortical activation during mental rotation in male-to-female and female-to-male transsexuals under hormonal treatment.
Psychoneuroendocrinology
PUBLISHED: 02-08-2010
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There is strong evidence of sex differences in mental rotation tasks. Transsexualism is an extreme gender identity disorder in which individuals seek cross-gender treatment to change their sex. The aim of our study was to investigate if male-to-female (MF) and female-to-male (FM) transsexuals receiving cross-sex hormonal treatment have different patterns of cortical activation during a three-dimensional (3D) mental rotation task. An fMRI study was performed using a 3-T scan in a sample of 18 MF and 19 FM under chronic cross-sex hormonal treatment. Twenty-three males and 19 females served as controls. The general pattern of cerebral activation seen while visualizing the rotated and non-rotated figures was similar for all four groups showing strong occipito-parieto-frontal brain activation. However, compared to control males, the activation of MF transsexuals during the task was lower in the superior parietal lobe. Compared to control females, MF transsexuals showed higher activation in orbital and right dorsolateral prefrontal regions and lower activation in the left prefrontal gyrus. FM transsexuals did not differ from either the MF transsexual or control groups. Regression analyses between cerebral activation and the number of months of hormonal treatment showed a significant negative correlation in parietal, occipital and temporal regions in the MF transsexuals. No significant correlations with time were seen in the FM transsexuals. In conclusion, although we did not find a specific pattern of cerebral activation in the FM transsexuals, we have identified a specific pattern of cerebral activation during a mental 3D rotation task in MF transsexuals under cross-sex hormonal treatment that differed from control males in the parietal region and from control females in the orbital prefrontal region. The hypoactivation in MF transsexuals in the parietal region could be due to the hormonal treatment or could reflect a priori cerebral differences between MF transsexual and control subjects.
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Permutations and time series analysis.
Chaos
PUBLISHED: 06-25-2009
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The main aim of this paper is to show how the use of permutations can be useful in the study of time series analysis. In particular, we introduce a test for checking the independence of a time series which is based on the number of admissible permutations on it. The main improvement in our tests is that we are able to give a theoretical distribution for independent time series.
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Familiality of gender identity disorder in non-twin siblings.
Arch Sex Behav
PUBLISHED: 05-17-2009
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Familial studies and reports of co-occurrence of gender identity disorder (GID) within a family may help to clarify the question of whether transsexualism is a familial phenomenon. In a sample of 995 consecutive transsexual probands (677 male-to-female [MF] and 318 female-to-male [FM]), we report 12 pairs of transsexual non-twin siblings (nine pairs of MF siblings, two pairs of MF-FM siblings, and one pair of FM siblings). The present study doubles the number of case reports of co-occurrence of transsexualism in non-twin siblings available in the literature. According to our data, the probability that a sibling of a transsexual will also be transsexual was 4.48 times higher for siblings of MF than for siblings of FM transsexual probands, and 3.88 times higher for the brothers than for the sisters of transsexual probands. Moreover, the prevalence of transsexualism in siblings of transsexuals (1/211 siblings) was much higher than the range expected according to the prevalence data of transsexualism in Spain. The study suggests that siblings of transsexuals may have a higher risk of being transsexual than the general population, and that the risk is higher for brothers than sisters of transsexuals, and for siblings of MF than FM transsexuals. Nevertheless, the risk is low.
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The effects of partial and complete masculinization on the sexual differentiation of nuclei that control lordotic behavior in the male rat.
Behav. Brain Res.
PUBLISHED: 02-25-2009
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Male rats, under certain experimental conditions, may show lordosis, the typical expression of female sexual receptivity. This work studies the sexual morphological pattern of facilitatory and inhibitory structures that control lordosis. Three groups of males were neonatally subjected to a gradient of androgen exposure (castrated plus injected oil (GxM+oil); castrated plus androstenedione treated (GxM+AND); and sham operated [CM]); a group of control females (CF) was also added. Lordotic response after these different hormonal and neonatal surgical treatments, as well as the volume or number of neurons in facilitatory (ventromedial nucleus of the hypothalamus [VMN]) and inhibitory (the intermediate region of the lateral septum [LSi] and accessory olfactory bulb [AOB]) nuclei involved in lordosis was studied in adults. The inhibition of lordosis in the males seems to be associated to the neonatal presence of testosterone and the consequent masculinization of the VMN, VMNvl, LSi and AOB. It is suggested that one of the functions of the sex differences consistently seen in these structures might be to inhibit the lordosis response in the male.
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Cortical thickness in untreated transsexuals.
Cereb. Cortex
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Sex differences in cortical thickness (CTh) have been extensively investigated but as yet there are no reports on CTh in transsexuals. Our aim was to determine whether the CTh pattern in transsexuals before hormonal treatment follows their biological sex or their gender identity. We performed brain magnetic resonance imaging on 94 subjects: 24 untreated female-to-male transsexuals (FtMs), 18 untreated male-to-female transsexuals (MtFs), and 29 male and 23 female controls in a 3-T TIM-TRIO Siemens scanner. T1-weighted images were analyzed to obtain CTh and volumetric subcortical measurements with FreeSurfer software. CTh maps showed control females have thicker cortex than control males in the frontal and parietal regions. In contrast, males have greater right putamen volume. FtMs had a similar CTh to control females and greater CTh than males in the parietal and temporal cortices. FtMs had larger right putamen than females but did not differ from males. MtFs did not differ in CTh from female controls but had greater CTh than control males in the orbitofrontal, insular, and medial occipital regions. In conclusion, FtMs showed evidence of subcortical gray matter masculinization, while MtFs showed evidence of CTh feminization. In both types of transsexuals, the differences with respect to their biological sex are located in the right hemisphere.
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Effects of androgenization on the white matter microstructure of female-to-male transsexuals. A diffusion tensor imaging study.
Psychoneuroendocrinology
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Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) can sensitively detect white matter sex differences and the effects of pharmacological treatments. Before cross-sex hormone treatment, the white matter microstructure of several brain bundles in female-to-male transsexuals (FtMs) differs from those in females but not from that in males. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether cross-sex hormone treatment (androgenization) affects the brain white matter microstructure. Using a Siemens 3 T Trio Tim Magneton, DTI was performed twice, before and during cross-sex hormonal treatment with testosterone in 15 FtMs scanned. Fractional anisotropy (FA) was analyzed on white matter of the whole brain, and the latter was spatially analyzed using Tract-Based Spatial Statistics. Before each scan the subjects were assessed for serum testosterone, sex hormone binding globulin level (SHBG), and their free testosterone index. After at least seven months of cross-gender hormonal treatment, FA values increased in the right superior longitudinal fasciculus (SLF) and the right corticospinal tract (CST) in FtMs compared to their pre-treatment values. Hierarchical regression analyses showed that the increments in the FA values in the SLF and CST are predicted by the free testosterone index before hormonal treatment. All these observations suggest that testosterone treatment changes white matter microstructure in FtMs.
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Clinical utility of the Bem Sex Role Inventory (BSRI) in the Spanish transsexual and nontranssexual population.
J Pers Assess
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The aim of the study is to evaluate the usefulness of the Bem Sex Role Inventory (BSRI; Bem, 1974), an overall measurement of the cultural construct of masculinity and femininity, in the psychological assessment of Spanish transsexuals. Seventy male-to-female transsexuals (MF), 51 female-to-male transsexuals (FM), 77 control men, and 79 control women completed the Spanish version of the BSRI. Statistically significant differences between groups were only found on the femininity scale, on which MF transsexuals and control women scored significantly higher than FM transsexuals and control men. The results indicate that (a) only the femininity scale of the BSRI appears to be useful today for evaluating differences in the sex-role identification in Spanish controls and transsexuals; and (b) MF and FM transsexuals score as a function of their gender identity instead of their anatomical sex on the BSRI femininity scale.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.