JoVE Visualize What is visualize?
Stop Reading. Start Watching.
Advanced Search
Stop Reading. Start Watching.
Regular Search
Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Patient characteristics and service trends following abortion legalization in Mexico City, 2007-10.
Stud Fam Plann
PUBLISHED: 10-07-2011
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Legal abortion services have been available in public and private health facilities in Mexico City since April 2007 for pregnancies of up to 12 weeks gestation. As of January 2011, more than 50,000 procedures have been performed by Ministry of Health hospitals and clinics. We researched trends in service users characteristics, types of procedures performed, post-procedure complications, repeat abortions, and postabortion uptake of contraception in 15 designated hospitals from April 2007 to March 2010. The trend in procedures has been toward more medication and manual vacuum aspiration abortions and fewer done through dilation and curettage. Percentages of post-procedure complications and repeat abortions remain low (2.3 and 0.9 percent, respectively). Uptake of postabortion contraception has increased over time; 85 percent of women selected a method in 2009-10, compared with 73 percent in 2007-08. Our findings indicate that the Ministry of Healths program provides safe services that contribute to the prevention of repeat unintended pregnancies.
Related JoVE Video
Inside the outbreak of the 2009 influenza A (H1N1)v virus in Mexico.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 08-18-2010
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Influenza viruses pose a threat to human health because of their potential to cause global disease. Between mid March and mid April a pandemic influenza A virus emerged in Mexico. This report details 202 cases of infection of humans with the 2009 influenza A virus (H1N1)v which occurred in Mexico City as well as the spread of the virus throughout the entire country.
Related JoVE Video
Identification of influenza A pandemic (H1N1) 2009 variants during the first 2009 influenza outbreak in Mexico City.
J. Clin. Virol.
PUBLISHED: 02-08-2010
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
In March 2009, public health surveillance detected increased numbers of influenza-like illness presenting to hospitals in Mexico City. The aetiological agent was subsequently determined to be a novel influenza A (H1N1) triple reassortant, which has spread worldwide. As a consequence the World Health Organisation has declared the first Influenza pandemic of the 21st century.
Related JoVE Video
Initial human transmission dynamics of the pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus in North America.
Influenza Other Respir Viruses
PUBLISHED: 08-26-2009
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Between 5 and 25 April 2009, pandemic (H1N1) 2009 caused a substantial, severe outbreak in Mexico, and subsequently developed into the first global pandemic in 41 years. We determined the reproduction number of pandemic (H1N1) 2009 by analyzing the dynamics of the complete case series in Mexico City during this early period.
Related JoVE Video
Stories behind the statistics: a review of abortion-related deaths from 2005 to 2007 in Mexico City.
Int J Gynaecol Obstet
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Evidence suggests that restricting abortion does not reduce its occurrence but increases health risk. A qualitative analysis was performed, reviewing the medical charts of 12 women who died from unsafe induced abortions in Mexico City; most deaths occurred before abortion was decriminalized. Women resorted to using unsafe techniques, without medical guidance or under incorrect recommendations by providers, ultimately resulting in the loss of their lives. Postabortion care in private and public health facilities was often inadequate. The cases illustrate the importance of liberalizing abortion laws and improving postabortion care to protect the life and health of women seeking to terminate pregnancy.
Related JoVE Video

What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.