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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Improved tolerability by a modified intermittent treatment schedule of dasatinib for patients with chronic myeloid leukemia resistant or intolerant to imatinib.
Ann. Hematol.
PUBLISHED: 04-09-2013
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Intermittent dosing of dasatinib with a once daily regimen has been shown to reduce side effects while preserving clinical efficacy in early and advanced phase chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). Yet, hematologic toxicity and fluid retention demand a dose modification or treatment discontinuation in selected patients. Patients resistant or intolerant to imatinib were retrospectively evaluated based on the toxicity-guided administration of a dose-reduced dasatinib regimen. Patients were treated with an on/off regimen (3 to 5 days on, 2 to 4 days off) to allow regression of dasatinib-dependent off-target toxicity. Patients were followed up by routine hematologic and cytogenetic assessment and molecular monitoring to safeguard clinical response to the altered drug schedule. Thirty-three CML patients primarily in chronic phase with imatinib intolerance (n = 11) or resistance (n = 22) were investigated. Nonexclusive reasons for dose reduction were hematologic toxicity (17/33, 51%) and pleural effusions (18/33, 55%). On/off treatment with a weekend drug holiday significantly reduced pleural effusions and hematologic toxicity. Eighteen of 31 (58%) patients showed effective disease control despite reduced total weekly dasatinib doses, either demonstrated by achieving an improved response level (12/31) or keeping the response level achieved by conventional continuous dosing (6/31). Of note, 10/12 patients with subsequently improved response have been treated for a minimum of 6 months with continuous dosing dasatinib regimens without having achieved the response level achieved after allowing drug holiday. Weekend treatment interruption of dasatinib allows continuation of dasatinib treatment for patients suffering from side effects. These data mandate prospective investigation of alternative intermittent targeting regimens.
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Impact of additional cytogenetic aberrations at diagnosis on prognosis of CML: long-term observation of 1151 patients from the randomized CML Study IV.
Blood
PUBLISHED: 10-28-2011
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The prognostic relevance of additional cytogenetic findings at diagnosis of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is unclear. The impact of additional cytogenetic findings at diagnosis on time to complete cytogenetic (CCR) and major molecular remission (MMR) and progression-free (PFS) and overall survival (OS) was analyzed using data from 1151 Philadelphia chromosome-positive (Ph(+)) CML patients randomized to the German CML Study IV. At diagnosis, 1003 of 1151 patients (87%) had standard t(9;22)(q34;q11) only, 69 patients (6.0%) had variant t(v;22), and 79 (6.9%) additional cytogenetic aberrations (ACAs). Of these, 38 patients (3.3%) lacked the Y chromosome (-Y) and 41 patients (3.6%) had ACAs except -Y; 16 of these (1.4%) were major route (second Philadelphia [Ph] chromosome, trisomy 8, isochromosome 17q, or trisomy 19) and 25 minor route (all other) ACAs. After a median observation time of 5.3 years for patients with t(9;22), t(v;22), -Y, minor- and major-route ACAs, the 5-year PFS was 90%, 81%, 88%, 96%, and 50%, and the 5-year OS was 92%, 87%, 91%, 96%, and 53%, respectively. In patients with major-route ACAs, the times to CCR and MMR were longer and PFS and OS were shorter (P < .001) than in patients with standard t(9;22). We conclude that major-route ACAs at diagnosis are associated with a negative impact on survival and signify progression to the accelerated phase and blast crisis.
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Current treatment concepts of CML.
Curr Cancer Drug Targets
PUBLISHED: 05-19-2011
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The elucidation of the triggering molecular mechanism of chronic myeloid leukemia gave rise to the development of imatinib, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor and a prototype of target-oriented drugs. Imatinib led to impressing response and survival rates and now represents the standard therapy of CML. However, a significant proportion of patients do not tolerate or fail to respond to imatinib treatment. Alternative therapies can be offered to those patients. The particular challenge of CML patient management is to recognize an impending imatinib failure by adequate surveillance and to know about therapeutic options to prevent progression of the disease to accelerated phase or blast crisis since these are more difficult to control. Targeted therapy with second-generation tyrosine kinase inhibitors should be used in synopsis with mutational analysis and the patients history. In this review we present current knowledge of diagnosis, monitoring and therapy strategies of patients with CML.
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Dynamics of mutant BCR-ABL-positive clones after cessation of tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy.
Haematologica
PUBLISHED: 12-06-2010
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Point mutations of the BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase domain are considered the predominant cause of imatinib resistance in chronic myeloid leukemia. The expansion of mutant BCR-ABL-positive clones under selective pressure of tyrosine kinase inhibition is referred to as clonal selection; there are few data on the reversibility of this phenomenon.
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Detection of centrosome aberrations in disease-unrelated cells from patients with tumor treated with tyrosine kinase inhibitors.
Eur. J. Haematol.
PUBLISHED: 04-16-2010
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Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) target various pathways associated with proliferation of aberrant clones in malignant diseases. Despite good response and acceptable tolerability, little is known concerning long-term toxicity. Furthermore, the influence of these inhibitors on disease-unrelated cells is not investigated yet.
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Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo SCT) for chronic myeloid leukemia in the imatinib era: evaluation of its impact within a subgroup of the randomized German CML Study IV.
Blood
PUBLISHED: 11-18-2009
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The role of allogeneic stem cell transplantation in chronic myeloid leukemia is being reevaluated. Whereas drug treatment has been shown to be superior in first-line treatment, data on allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo SCT) as second-line therapy after imatinib failure are scarce. Using an interim safety analysis of the randomized German CML Study IV designed to optimize imatinib therapy by combination, dose escalation, and transplantation, we here report on 84 patients who underwent consecutive transplantation according to predefined criteria (low European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation [EBMT] score, imatinib failure, and advanced disease). Three-year survival after transplantation of 56 patients in chronic phase was 91% (median follow-up: 30 months). Transplantation-related mortality was 8%. In a matched pair comparison of patients who received a transplant and those who did not, survival was not different. Three-year survival after transplantation of 28 patients in advanced phase was 59%. Eighty-eight percent of patients who received a transplant achieved complete molecular remissions. We conclude that allo SCT could become the preferred second-line option after imatinib failure for suitable patients with a donor. The study is registered at the National Institutes of Health, http://clinicaltrials.gov: NCT00055874.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.