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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Complementary induction of immunogenic cell death by oncolytic parvovirus H-1PV and gemcitabine in pancreatic cancer.
J. Virol.
PUBLISHED: 02-26-2014
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Novel therapies employing oncolytic viruses have emerged as promising anticancer modalities. The cure of particularly aggressive malignancies requires induction of immunogenic cell death (ICD), coupling oncolysis with immune responses via calreticulin, ATP, and high-mobility group box protein B1 (HMGB1) release from dying tumor cells. The present study shows that in human pancreatic cancer cells (pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma [PDAC] cells n=4), oncolytic parvovirus H-1 (H-1PV) activated multiple interconnected death pathways but failed to induce calreticulin exposure or ATP release. In contrast, H-1PV elevated extracellular HMGB1 levels by 4.0±0.5 times (58%±9% of total content; up to 100 ng/ml) in all infected cultures, whether nondying, necrotic, or apoptotic. An alternative secretory route allowed H-1PV to overcome the failure of gemcitabine to trigger HMGB1 release, without impeding cytotoxicity or other ICD activities of the standard PDAC medication. Such broad resistance of H-1PV-induced HMGB1 release to apoptotic blockage coincided with but was uncoupled from an autocrine interleukin-1? (IL-1?) loop. That and the pattern of viral determinants maintained in gemcitabine-treated cells suggested the activation of an inflammasome/caspase 1 (CASP1) platform alongside DNA detachment and/or nuclear exclusion of HMGB1 during early stages of the viral life cycle. We concluded that H-1PV infection of PDAC cells is signaled through secretion of the alarmin HMGB1 and, besides its own oncolytic effect, might convert drug-induced apoptosis into an ICD process. A transient arrest of cells in the cyclin A1-rich S phase would suffice to support compatibility of proliferation-dependent H-1PV with cytotoxic regimens. These properties warrant incorporation of the oncolytic virus H-1PV, which is not pathogenic in humans, into multimodal anticancer treatments.
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Interferon ? improves the vaccination potential of oncolytic parvovirus H-1PV for the treatment of peritoneal carcinomatosis in pancreatic cancer.
Cancer Biol. Ther.
PUBLISHED: 11-15-2011
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Oncolytic viruses with their capacity to specifically replicate in and kill tumor cells emerged as a novel class of cancer therapeutics. Rat oncolytic parvovirus (H-1PV) was used to treat different types of cancer in preclinical settings and was lately successfully combined with standard gemcitabine chemotherapy in treating pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) in rats. Our previous work showed that the immune system and particularly the release of interferon-gamma (IFN?) seem to mediate the anticancer effect of H-1PV in that model. Therefore, we reasoned that the therapeutic properties of H-1PV can be boosted with IFN? for the treatment of late incurable stages of PDAC like peritoneal carcinomatosis. Rats bearing established orthotopic pancreatic carcinomas with peritoneal metastases were treated with a single intratumoral (i.t.) or intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of 5 x 10? plaque forming units of H-1PV with or without concomitant IFN? application. Intratumoral injection proved to be more effective than the intraperitoneal route in controlling the growth of both the primary pancreatic tumors and peritoneal carcinomatosis, accompanied by migration of virus from primary to metastatic deposits. Concomitant i.p. treatment of H-1PV with recIFN? resulted in improved therapeutic effect yielding an extended animal survival, compared with i.p. treatment with H-1PV alone. IFN? application enhanced the H-1PV-induced peritoneal macrophage and splenocyte responses against tumor cells while causing a significant reduction in the titers of H1-PV-neutralising antibodies in ascitic fluid. Thus, IFN? co-application together with H-1PV might be considered as a novel therapeutic option to improve the survival of PDAC patients with peritoneal carcinomatosis.
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Pancreatic cancer cell lines can induce prostaglandin e2 production from human blood mononuclear cells.
J Oncol
PUBLISHED: 02-18-2011
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Accumulating evidence suggests an important role for cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) in the pathogenesis of a wide range of malignancies. The protumorigenic properties of COX-2 are generally thought to be mediated by its product, PGE(2), which is shown to promote tumor spread and growth by multiple mechanisms but most importantly through modulation of the local immune response in the tumor. Pancreatic tumor cells produce various amounts of PGE(2), some of them being even deficient in COX enzymes or other PGE(2) synthases. Here we describe that, beside pancreatic tumor cells or stromal fibroblasts, human peripheral blood mononuclear cells can also produce PGE(2) upon coculture with pancreatic cancer cells. Stimulating of cellular cPLA2 within PBMCs by secreted factors, presumably sPLA2, from tumor cells appeared crucial, while the direct contact between PBMCs and PDACs seemed to be dispensable for this effect. Our data is emphasizing the complex interactions participating in the formation of the tolerogenic immune milieu within pancreatic tumors.
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Oncolytic parvoviruses as cancer therapeutics.
Cytokine Growth Factor Rev.
PUBLISHED: 03-07-2010
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The experimental infectivity and excellent tolerance of some rodent autonomous parvoviruses in humans, together with their oncosuppressive effects in preclinical models, speak for the inclusion of these agents in the arsenal of oncolytic viruses under consideration for cancer therapy. In particular, wild-type parvovirus H-1PV can achieve a complete cure of various tumors in animal models and kill tumor cells that resist conventional anticancer treatments. There is growing evidence that H-1PV oncosuppression involves an immune component in addition to the direct viral oncolytic effect. This article summarizes the recent assessment of H-1PV antineoplastic activity in glioma, pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, and non-Hodgkin lymphoma models, laying the foundation for the present launch of a first phase I/IIa clinical trial on glioma patients.
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Oncolytic rat parvovirus H-1PV, a candidate for the treatment of human lymphoma: In vitro and in vivo studies.
Mol. Ther.
PUBLISHED: 04-14-2009
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The incidence of lymphomas developing in both immunocompetent and immunosuppressed patients continues to steadily increase worldwide. Current chemotherapy and immunotherapy approaches have several limitations, such as severe side toxicity and selection of resistant cell variants. Autonomous parvoviruses (PVs), in particular the rat parvovirus H-1PV, have emerged as promising anticancer agents. Although it is apathogenic in humans, H-1PV has been shown to infect and suppress various rat and human tumors in animal models. In this study, we demonstrate the capacity of H-1PV for efficiently killing, through necrosis, cell cultures originating from Burkitts lymphoma (BL), while sparing normal B lymphocytes. The cytotoxic effect was generally accompanied by a productive H-1PV infection. Remarkably, parvovirus-based monotherapy efficiently suppressed established BL at an advanced stage in a severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mouse model of the disease. The data show for the first time that an oncolytic parvovirus deserves further consideration as a potential tool for the treatment of some non-Hodgkin B-cell lymphomas, including those resistant to apoptosis induction by rituximab.
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Improvement of gemcitabine-based therapy of pancreatic carcinoma by means of oncolytic parvovirus H-1PV.
Clin. Cancer Res.
PUBLISHED: 01-17-2009
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Pancreatic carcinoma is a gastrointestinal malignancy with poor prognosis. Treatment with gemcitabine, the most potent chemotherapeutic against this cancer up to date, is not curative, and resistance may appear. Complementary treatment with an oncolytic virus, such as the rat parvovirus H-1PV, which is infectious but nonpathogenic in humans, emerges as an innovative option.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.