JoVE Visualize What is visualize?
Stop Reading. Start Watching.
Advanced Search
Stop Reading. Start Watching.
Regular Search
Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Which are the features of the TUBE task that make it so efficient in detecting manual asymmetries? An investigation in two Cercopithecine species (Cercopithecus neglectus and Cercocebus torquatus).
J Comp Psychol
PUBLISHED: 06-17-2013
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
In the last decade, the TUBE task has been repeatedly shown to be highly efficient in detecting manual asymmetries that are strong hand preferences reflecting hemispheric specialization, in non human primates. The TUBE task was thus classified as a high-level task, presumably because it involves bimanual coordination. However, this task also requires a precise action made by digit(s), which may also be a crucial feature in eliciting manual asymmetries. In the present study, we compared hand preferences for a new TUBE-unimanual task and the classic TUBE-bimanual task, both performed mostly by using the forefinger, in 12 guenons (De Brazzas monkey: Cercopithecus neglectus) and 18 mangabeys (red-capped mangabey: Cercocebus torquatus). We found a relationship between hand preferences exhibited for the two tasks, suggesting that precise use of the forefinger may induce the activation of a specialized hemisphere in both the TUBE-unimanual and the TUBE-bimanual task. However, we showed that the strength of manual laterality was higher in the TUBE-bimanual task than in the TUBE-unimanual task, indicating that bimanual coordination may enhance the expression of hand preferences. We propose that the TUBE-bimanual task is highly efficient in detecting hemispheric specialization because bimanual role differentiation would make precise digit use highly skillful. Finally, we revealed species differences in hand use, especially in females: the most arboreal species, De Brazzas monkeys, increased left-hand use from the TUBE-unimanual to the TUBE-bimanual task whereas the most terrestrial species, red-capped mangabeys, increased right-hand use. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved).
Related JoVE Video
Manual laterality and strategy use for a coordinated bimanual task requiring precise and power grip in guenons and mangabeys.
Am. J. Primatol.
PUBLISHED: 04-08-2013
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Bimanual tasks have been repeatedly shown to elicit manual asymmetries supposed to reflect hemispheric specialization. And yet, a coordinated bimanual task, the BOX task, appears to be inefficient in detecting biases of hand preferences. The BOX task involves two sequential actions requiring a precise grip, lift the lid of a box and grasp a small item inside the box (while holding the lid). In the present study, we compared manual laterality exhibited for the classic bimanual BOX task and for a unimanual BOX task in 11 De Brazzas monkeys (Cercopithecus neglectus) and 19 red-capped mangabeys (Cercocebus torquatus). In addition, we assessed strategy use for solving the bimanual BOX task. We found that left-hand use for grasping the item was higher in the BOX-bimanual task than in the BOX-unimanual task. We propose that this increase in left-hand use for grasping the item results from both a hemispheric specialization for lifting the lid and an advantage in using a skillful strategy. Indeed, we revealed (1) group-level right biases for lifting the lid and (2) a complete differentiation between the roles of the two hands in subjects showing a left-hand preference for grasping the item. Finally, the bimanual BOX task showed age differences in the two species, either in manual laterality for grasping the item or in strategy use. This study provides additional evidence that manual laterality might be sensitive to maturational factors and characteristics of the bimanual tasks such as the order and the features of sequential actions.
Related JoVE Video
Hand preference and its flexibility according to the position of the object: a study in cercopithecines examining spontaneous behaviour and an experimental task (the Bishop QHP task).
Anim Cogn
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
The extant literature on manual laterality in non-human primates is inconclusive, plagued by inconsistent or contradictory findings and by disturbing methodological issues (e.g. uncontrolled influential factors, comparability issues). The present study examined hand preference and its flexibility in 15 red-capped mangabeys (C. t. torquatus) and 13 Campbells monkeys (C. c. campbelli), two species that differ in their degree of arboreality. We investigated the influence of the spatial position of the object on hand preference for reaching. We considered spontaneous behaviour (reaching for food during daily feeding) and an experimental task: the QHP task. The QHP is a task that is used in humans. This is a simple reaching task that involves high spatial constraints on hand use. In our study, the subject had to reach for items that were placed on a semi-circle in front of it on five positions, including in the centre position, in the ipsilateral space and in the contralateral space. We assessed hand preference for reaching in front (baseline condition), and we examined how this preference changed when reaching in lateral positions. For reaching in front, about half of the subjects were lateralized and no group-level bias occurred, for both spontaneous and experimental conditions. When considering reaching in the lateral positions, we observed that the position of the object influenced hand use: individuals used the hand that was closest to the object. The results are discussed in relation to previous findings in humans and in non-human primates and regarding theories on handedness and flexibility of hand preference.
Related JoVE Video
To beg, or not to beg? That is the question: mangabeys modify their production of requesting gestures in response to humans attentional states.
PLoS ONE
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Although gestural communication is widespread in primates, few studies focused on the cognitive processes underlying gestures produced by monkeys.
Related JoVE Video
Does a nonprimate mammal, the northern tree shrew (Tupaia belangeri), exhibit paw preference in two forms of a grasping task?
J Comp Psychol
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Tree shrews represent a relevant model to study the evolution of primate manual laterality as they are phylogenetically close to primates, they are able to grasp despite having a nonopposable thumb, and they possess a well-developed visual system. In this study, we examined the paw laterality and grasping success rate of 30 Tupaia belangeri (15 males, 15 females) in 2 forced-food grasping tasks (i.e., in a forced-food grasping experiment, the animal has to use paws instead of mouth for food retrieval). We also attempted to determine whether paw usage would be affected by the availability of visual cues using both a visual task (transparent tube) and a nonvisual task (identical but opaque tube). In both tasks, tree shrews showed paw preferences at an individual but not at a population level. Paw laterality (direction and strength) did not differ between tasks. Moreover, in the specific task that we used, grasping success rate was not affected by an absence of visual cues, indicating that tree shrews did not rely on visual guidance to direct their grasps in this forced-food grasping experiment. Our findings suggest that, in contrast to primates, paw usage in tree shrews may result from a modification of a fixed motor pattern in which the preferred direction may be learned. This basic motor organization might be a first step in the evolution of manual laterality, which eventually became controlled by vision in the primate lineage.
Related JoVE Video

What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.