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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Timing and characteristics of radiation pneumonitis after stereotactic body radiotherapy for peripherally located stage I lung cancer.
Int. J. Clin. Oncol.
PUBLISHED: 07-18-2014
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This study was conducted to determine the timing and characteristics of radiation pneumonitis (RP) associated with stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for stage I lung cancer.
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RBE and OER within the spread-out Bragg peak for proton beam therapy: in vitro study at the Proton Medical Research Center at the University of Tsukuba.
J. Radiat. Res.
PUBLISHED: 05-29-2014
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There are few reports on the biological homogeneity within the spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP) of proton beams. Therefore, to evaluate the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) and the oxygen enhancement ratio (OER), human salivary gland tumor (HSG) cells were irradiated at the plateau position (position A) and three different positions within a 6-cm-wide SOBP (position B, 26 mm proximal to the middle; position C, middle; position D, 26 mm distal to the middle) using 155-MeV/n proton beams under both normoxic and hypoxic conditions at the Proton Medical Research Center, University of Tsukuba, Japan. The RBE to the plateau region (RBE(plateau)) and the OER value were calculated from the doses corresponding to 10% survival data. Under the normoxic condition, the RBE(plateau) was 1.00, 0.99 and 1.09 for positions B, C and D, respectively. Under the hypoxic condition, the RBE(plateau) was 1.10, 1.06 and 1.12 for positions B, C and D, respectively. The OER was 2.84, 2.60, 2.63 and 2.76 for positions A, B, C and D, respectively. There were no significant differences in either the RBE(plateau) or the OER between these three positions within the SOBP. In conclusion, biological homogeneity need not necessarily be taken into account for treatment planning for proton beam therapy at the University of Tsukuba.
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Outcomes and Prognostic Factors for Recurrence After High-Dose Proton Beam Therapy for Centrally and Peripherally Located Stage I Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer.
Clin Lung Cancer
PUBLISHED: 09-05-2013
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This study was conducted to determine disease control rates and prognostic factors associated with recurrence of centrally and peripherally located stage I NSCLC treated using high-dose PBT.
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Delayed radiotherapy for patients with localized prostate cancer: validation by propensity score matching.
Anticancer Res.
PUBLISHED: 04-09-2013
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To retrospectively investigate the biochemical outcome following delayed radiotherapy in patients with prostate cancer.
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A phase I study on combined therapy with proton-beam radiotherapy and in situ tumor vaccination for locally advanced recurrent hepatocellular carcinoma.
Radiat Oncol
PUBLISHED: 03-25-2013
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Proton-beam radiotherapy (PBT) has been shown to be effective to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) as a nonsurgical local treatment option. However, HCC still remains as one of the most difficult cancers to be cured because of frequent recurrences. Thus, methods to inhibit the recurrence need to be explored. To prevent the HCC recurrence, we here report on a prospective phase I study of in situ tumor vaccination using CalTUMP, a newly developed immunoadjuvant consisting of BCG extract bound to hydroxyapatite and microparticulated tuberculin, following local PBT for HCC.
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Radiotherapy for patients with symptomatic intramedullary spinal cord metastasis.
J. Radiat. Res.
PUBLISHED: 07-15-2011
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The study was performed to evaluate radiotherapy for patients with intramedullary spinal cord metastasis (ISCM) and to identify the clinical features of ISCM. The subjects were 18 patients (8 men, 10 women) with ISCM who underwent radiotherapy between September 2002 and February 2008. The primary lesions were lung cancer in 8 patients (2 small cell, 6 non-small cell), breast cancer in 6, malignant melanoma in 2, renal cell carcinoma in 1, and rectal cancer in 1 patient. Diagnosis, symptoms and survival of these patients were compared with those for 544 patients with vertebral metastases who underwent radiotherapy at the same institute between September 2002 and November 2006. In the 18 patients with ISCM, the 6-month survival rate after radiotherapy was 36% and the median survival period was 4.0 months. Ten patients had neurological improvement or pain relief after radiotherapy. Brain metastases were six fold more frequent in the patients with ISCM than in those with vertebral metastasis [89% vs. 15%, p = 0.001]. At the time of radiotherapy, back pain in patients with vertebral metastasis was more frequent [97% vs. 33%, p = 0.001] but neurological deficits were less common [24% vs. 100% , p = 0.001]. Most ISCM cases were diagnosed by contrast-enhanced MRI, with detection by contrast-enhanced CT in only 3/18 cases (17%). ISCM has a poor prognosis and most patients have neurological deficits that impair quality of life. Early diagnosis by MRI is important for suspected ISCM to allow initiation of radiotherapy before development of neurological deficits.
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Occurrence and clinical features of brain metastasis after chemoradiotherapy for esophageal carcinoma.
J. Radiat. Res.
PUBLISHED: 04-14-2011
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Brain metastasis from esophageal carcinoma has been considered rare and survival following esophageal carcinoma with distant metastasis is poor. The purpose of this report was to clarify cumulative incidence and risk factors for brain metastasis after chemoradiotherapy for esophageal carcinoma, and to consider recommended treatments for brain metastasis from esophageal carcinoma. We reviewed 391 patients treated with chemoradiotherapy. Median age was 65 years. Clinical stages were I, II, III, and IV in 32, 47, 150, and 162 patients, respectively. Brain imaging was performed usually when patients revealed neurological symptoms. The 3-year cumulative incidence of brain metastasis after chemoradiotherapy was 6.6%. There were 4 patients with single metastasis and 8 with multiple metastases. Initial clinical stages were II, III, and IV in 1, 2, and 9 patients, respectively. Histology included squamous cell carcinoma in 10 patients and others in 2 patients. Univariate analysis demonstrated M factor, distant lymph node relapse, and recurrent lung and liver metastasis as significant risk factors of brain metastasis (P < 0.05). Median survival time after diagnosis of brain metastasis was 2.1 months. Brain metastasis was not directly related to cause of mortality. The causes were extracranial tumor deterioration in 8 patients and infection in 4 patients. Brain metastasis may increase in the future with improving survival from esophageal carcinoma. However, considering the poor survival after diagnosis of brain metastasis, short-term palliative therapy for brain metastasis appears preferable to vigorous long-term therapy.
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Outcome of T4 (International Union Against Cancer Staging System, 7th edition) or recurrent nasal cavity and paranasal sinus carcinoma treated with proton beam.
Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys.
PUBLISHED: 03-14-2011
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To investigate the clinical features, prognostic factors, and toxicity of treatment for unresectable carcinomas of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinus (NCPS) treated with proton beam therapy (PBT).
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Proton beam therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma: a comparison of three treatment protocols.
Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys.
PUBLISHED: 04-26-2010
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Our previous results for treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with proton beam therapy revealed excellent local control with low toxicity. Three protocols were used to avoid late complications such as gastrointestinal ulceration and bile duct stenosis. In this study, we examined the efficacy of these protocols.
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Phase I/II trial of hyperfractionated concomitant boost proton radiotherapy for supratentorial glioblastoma multiforme.
Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys.
PUBLISHED: 01-28-2009
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To evaluate the safety and efficacy of postoperative hyperfractionated concomitant boost proton radiotherapy with nimustine hydrochloride for supratentorial glioblastoma multiforme (GBM).
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Development of the dorsal ramus of the spinal nerve in the chick embryo: a close relationship between development and expression of guidance cues.
Brain Res.
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The spinal nerve, which is composed of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) axons and spinal motor axons, divides into ventral and dorsal rami. Although the development of the ventral ramus has been examined in considerable detail, that of the dorsal ramus has not. Therefore, we first examined the spatial-temporal pattern of the dorsal ramus formation in the chick embryo, with special reference to the projection to the dermamyotome and its derivatives. Next, we focused on two guidance molecules, chick semaphorin 3A (SEMA3A) and fibroblast growth factor 8 (FGF8), because these are the best candidates as molecules for controlling the dorsal ramus formation. Using in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry methods, we clearly showed a close relationship between the spatial-temporal expression of SEMA3A/FGF8 and the projection of dorsal ramus fibers to the dorsal muscles. We further examined the axonal response of motor and DRG neurons to SEMA3A and FGF8. We showed that motor axons responded to both SEMA3A-induced repulsion and FGF8-induced attraction. On the other hand, DRG axons responded to SEMA3A-induced repulsion but not to FGF8-induced attraction. These findings suggest that FGF8-induced attraction may guide early motor axons beneath the myotome and that SEMA3A-induced repulsion may prevent these early motor axons from entering the myotome. Our results also imply that the loss of SEMA3A expression in the dorsal muscles may lead to the gross projection of the dorsal ramus fibers into the dorsal muscles. Together, SEMA3A and FGF8 may contribute to the proper formation of the dorsal ramus.
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Dose-volume histogram analysis for risk factors of radiation-induced rib fracture after hypofractionated proton beam therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma.
Acta Oncol
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Radiation-induced rib fracture has been reported as a late complication after external radiotherapy to the chest. The purpose of this study was to clarify the characteristics and risk factors of rib fracture after hypofractionated proton beam therapy (PBT).
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Proton beam therapy for inoperable recurrence of bronchial high-grade mucoepidermoid carcinoma.
Jpn. J. Clin. Oncol.
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We report the case of a 17-year-old patient who received four courses of proton beam therapy for inoperable recurrent high-grade bronchial mucoepidermoid carcinoma of the chest wall and lymph nodes. The equivalent doses in conventional fractionation of 79.2-80.6 Gy were applied to the tumor from the first to third courses of proton beam therapy; the hemi-chest wall was also irradiated prophylactically in the third course. The irradiated tumor recurred marginally and liver metastasis developed, but tumor size within the irradiated field was suppressed. Proton beam therapy was also applied to the marginally recurrent tumor in the fourth course. The patient died of cancer about 5 years after the first course of proton beam therapy-about 9 years after the initial diagnosis and surgery. Repeated irradiation of the mediastinum and chest wall with photon radiotherapy is often limited by side-effects in the heart, esophagus and spinal cord. However, no severe late complications in critical organs were detected in this case. Only a Grade 2 skin reaction and lymphatic edema were observed. Therefore, high-dose proton beam therapy may be an option as a salvage therapy with less toxicity to normal tissues compared with photon radiotherapy and provide an alternative to repeated surgery.
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Evaluation of liver function after proton beam therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma.
Int. J. Radiat. Oncol. Biol. Phys.
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Our previous results for treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma with proton beam therapy (PBT) revealed excellent local control. In this study, we focused on the impact of PBT on normal liver function.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.