JoVE Visualize What is visualize?
Stop Reading. Start Watching.
Advanced Search
Stop Reading. Start Watching.
Regular Search
Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
The risks of acute exposure to black carbon in Southern Europe: results from the MED-PARTICLES project.
Occup Environ Med
PUBLISHED: 11-12-2014
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
While several studies have reported associations of daily exposures to PM2.5 (particles less than 2.5?µm) with mortality, few studies have examined the impact of its constituents such as black carbon (BC), which is also a significant contributor to global climate change.
Related JoVE Video
Impact of air pollution on fertility: a systematic review.
Gynecol. Endocrinol.
PUBLISHED: 09-13-2014
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Abstract Air pollution has gained considerable interest because of the multiple adverse effects reported on human health, although its impact on fertility remains unclear. A systematic search was performed to evaluate the impact of air pollutants on fertility. Controlled trials and observational studies assessing animal model and epidemiological model were included. Occupational exposure and semen quality studies were not considered. Outcomes of interest included live birth, miscarriage, clinical pregnancy, implantation, and embryo quality. Ten studies were included and divided into two groups: animal studies and human epidemiological studies including the general population as well as women undergoing in vitro fertilization and embryo transfer (IVF/ET). Results from this systematic review suggest a significant impact of air pollution on miscarriage and clinical pregnancy rates in the general population, whereas among subfertile patients certain air pollutants seem to exert a greater impact on fertility outcomes, including miscarriage and live birth rates. Besides, studies in mammals observed a clear detrimental effect on fertility outcomes associated to air pollutants at high concentration. The lack of prospective studies evaluating the effect of air pollution exposure in terms of live birth constitutes an important limitation in this review. Thus, further studies are needed to confirm these findings.
Related JoVE Video
Adult lung function and long-term air pollution exposure. ESCAPE: a multicentre cohort study and meta-analysis.
Eur. Respir. J.
PUBLISHED: 09-05-2014
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
The chronic impact of ambient air pollutants on lung function in adults is not fully understood. The objective of this study was to investigate the association of long-term exposure to ambient air pollution with lung function in adult participants from five cohorts in the European Study of Cohorts for Air Pollution Effects (ESCAPE). Residential exposure to nitrogen oxides (NO2, NOx) and particulate matter (PM) was modelled and traffic indicators were assessed in a standardised manner. The spirometric parameters forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) and forced vital capacity (FVC) from 7613 subjects were considered as outcomes. Cohort-specific results were combined using meta-analysis. We did not observe an association of air pollution with longitudinal change in lung function, but we observed that a 10 ?g·m(-3) increase in NO2 exposure was associated with lower levels of FEV1 (-14.0 mL, 95%CI -25.8- -2.1) and FVC (-14.9 mL, 95% CI -28.7- -1.1). An increase of 10 ?g·m(-3) in PM10, but not other PM metrics (PM2.5, coarse fraction of PM, PM absorbance), was associated with a lower level of FEV1 (-44.6 mL, 95% CI -85.4- -3.8) and FVC (-59.0 mL, 95% CI -112.3- -5.6). The associations were particularly strong in obese persons. This study adds to the evidence for an adverse association of ambient air pollution with lung function in adults at very low levels in Europe.
Related JoVE Video
Air pollution and human fertility rates.
Environ Int
PUBLISHED: 02-27-2014
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Some reports have suggested effects of air pollution on semen quality and success rates of in vitro fertilization (IVF) in humans and lower fertility rates in mice. However, no studies have evaluated the impact of air pollution on human fertility rates.
Related JoVE Video
Association of ambient air pollution with the prevalence and incidence of COPD.
Eur. Respir. J.
PUBLISHED: 01-31-2014
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
The role of air pollution in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) remains uncertain. The aim was to assess the impact of chronic exposure to air pollution on COPD in four cohorts using the standardised ESCAPE exposure estimates. Annual average particulate matter (PM), nitrogen oxides (NOx) and road traffic exposure were assigned to home addresses using land-use regression models. COPD was defined by NHANES reference equation (forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1)/forced vital capacity (FVC) less than the lower limit of normal) and the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease criterion (FEV1/FVC <0.70) and categorised by severity in non-asthmatics. We included 6550 subjects with assigned NOx and 3692 with PM measures. COPD was not associated with NO2 or PM10 in any individual cohort. In meta-analyses only NO2, NOx, PM10 and the traffic indicators were positively, although not significantly, associated with COPD. The only statistically significant associations were seen in females (COPD prevalence using GOLD: OR 1.57, 95% CI 1.11-2.23; and incidence: OR 1.79, 95% CI 1.21-2.68). None of the principal results were statistically significant, the weak positive associations of exposure with COPD and the significant subgroup findings need to be evaluated in further well standardised cohorts followed up for longer time, and with time-matched exposure assignments.
Related JoVE Video
Occupational exposures and uncontrolled adult-onset asthma in the ECRHS II.
Eur. Respir. J.
PUBLISHED: 08-15-2013
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Occupational exposure is a well-recognized modifiable risk factor for asthma but the relationship between occupational exposure and asthma control has not been studied. We aimed to study this association among working-age adults from the European Community Respiratory Health Survey (ECRHS).Data were available for 7077 participants (in average 43 years, 45% never smokers; 5867 without asthma, 1210 with current asthma). Associations between occupational exposure to specific asthmagens and asthma control status (33% with uncontrolled asthma, based on the GINA guidelines) were evaluated using logistic and multinomial regressions, adjusted for age, gender and smoking status, with study areas included as a random effect.Statistically significant positive associations were observed between uncontrolled adult-onset asthma and both past 12-month and 10-year exposure to any occupational asthmagens (odds ratio (OR) [95% confidence interval]: 1.6[1.0-2.4], 1.7[1.2-2.5], respectively), high (1.7[1.0-2.8], 1.9[1.3-2.9]) and low (1.6[1.0-2.7], 1.8[1.2-2.7]) molecular weight agents, and cleaning agents (2.0[1.1-3.6], 2.3[1.4-3.6]), with stronger associations for long-term exposures. These associations were mainly explained by the exacerbation domain of asthma control and no associations were observed between asthmagens and partly-controlled asthma.These findings suggest that occupational exposure to asthmagens is associated with uncontrolled adult-onset asthma. Occupational risk factors should be quickly identified to prevent uncontrolled asthma.
Related JoVE Video
Environment and asthma in adults.
Presse Med
PUBLISHED: 06-03-2013
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
The present review addresses recent advances and especially challenging aspects regarding the role of environmental risk factors in adult-onset asthma, for which the causes are poorly established. In the first part of the review, we discuss aspects regarding some environmental risk factors for adult-onset asthma: air pollution, occupational exposures with a focus on an emerging risk represented by exposure to cleaning agents (both at home and in the workplace), and lifestyle and nutrition. The second part is focused on perspectives and challenges, regarding relevant topics on which research is needed to improve the understanding of the role of environmental factors in asthma. Aspects of exposure assessment, the complexity of multiple exposures, the interrelationships of the environment with behavioral characteristics and the importance of studying biological markers and gene-environment interactions to identify the role of the environment in asthma are discussed. We conclude that environmental and lifestyle exposures play an important role in asthma or related phenotypes. The changes in lifestyle and the environment in recent decades have modified the specific risk factors in asthma even for well-recognized risks such as occupational exposures. To better understand the role of the environment in asthma, the use of objective (quantitative measurement of exposures) or modern tools (bar code, GPS) and the development of multidisciplinary collaboration would be very promising. A better understanding of the complex interrelationships between socio-economic, nutritional, lifestyle and environmental conditions might help to study their joint and independent roles in asthma.
Related JoVE Video
Temporal asthma patterns using repeated questionnaires over 13 years in a large French cohort of women.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Variable expression is one aspect of the heterogeneity of asthma. We aimed to define a variable pattern, which is relevant in general health epidemiological cohorts. Our objectives were to assess whether: 1) asthma patterns defined using simple asthma questions through repeated measurements could reflect disease variability 2) these patterns may further be classified according to asthma severity/control. Among 70,428 French women, we used seven questionnaires (1992-2005) and a comprehensive reimbursement database (2004-2009) to define three reliable asthma patterns based on repeated positive answers to the ever asthma attack question: "never asthma" (n?=?64,061); "inconsistent" ("yes" followed by "no", n?=?3,514); "consistent" (fully consistent positive answers, n?=?2,853). The "Inconsistent" pattern was related to both long-term (childhood-onset asthma with remission in adulthood) and short-term (reported asthma attack in the last 12 months, associated with asthma medication) asthma variability, showing that repeated questions are relevant markers of the variable expression of asthma. Furthermore, in this pattern, the number of positive responses (1992-2005) predicted asthma drug consumption in subsequent years, a marker of disease severity. The "Inconsistent" pattern is a phenotype that may capture the variable expression of asthma. Repeated answers, even to a simple question, are too often neglected.
Related JoVE Video
Air pollution and asthma control in the Epidemiological study on the Genetics and Environment of Asthma.
J Epidemiol Community Health
PUBLISHED: 06-20-2011
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
The associations between exposure to air pollution and asthma control are not well known. The objective of this study was to assess the association between long-term exposure to NO(2), O(3) and PM(10) and asthma control in the follow-up of the Epidemiological study on the Genetics and Environment of Asthma (EGEA2) (2003-2007).
Related JoVE Video
Source category-specific PM2.5 and urinary levels of Clara cell protein CC16. The ULTRA study.
Inhal Toxicol
PUBLISHED: 10-27-2009
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
We have previously reported that outdoor levels of fine particles (PM(2.5), diameter <2.5 microm) are associated with urinary CC16, a marker for lung damage, in Helsinki, Finland, but not in the other two ULTRA cities (Amsterdam, The Netherlands, and Erfurt, Germany). We here evaluated whether PM(2.5) from specific source categories would be more strongly associated with CC16 than (total) PM(2.5). In addition, we compared two source apportionment methods.
Related JoVE Video
DNA variants, plasma levels and variability of interleukin-6 in myocardial infarction survivors: results from the AIRGENE study.
Thromb. Res.
PUBLISHED: 10-23-2009
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Increased levels of interleukin 6 (IL-6), a marker for systemic inflammation, have been associated with cardiovascular morbidity and mortality.
Related JoVE Video
Home outdoor NO2 and new onset of self-reported asthma in adults.
Epidemiology
PUBLISHED: 05-27-2009
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Few studies have investigated new onset of asthma in adults in relation to air pollution. The aim of this study is to investigate the association between modeled background levels of traffic-related air pollution at the subjects home addresses and self-reported asthma incidence in a European adult population.
Related JoVE Video
Modification of the interleukin-6 response to air pollution by interleukin-6 and fibrinogen polymorphisms.
Environ. Health Perspect.
PUBLISHED: 04-06-2009
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Evidence suggests that cardiovascular effects of air pollution are mediated by inflammation and that air pollution can induce genetic expression of the interleukin-6 gene (IL6).
Related JoVE Video
Related JoVE Video
Fibrinogen genes modify the fibrinogen response to ambient particulate matter.
Am. J. Respir. Crit. Care Med.
PUBLISHED: 01-08-2009
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Ambient particulate matter has been associated with systemic inflammation indicated by blood markers such as fibrinogen, implicated in promoting atherothrombosis.
Related JoVE Video
The role of air pollution in adult-onset asthma: a review of the current evidence.
Semin Respir Crit Care Med
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
The causes of adult-onset asthma are poorly established, and the asthmogenic role of air pollution has been investigated primarily in children. This review assesses the current evidence of the association between air pollution and asthma incidence among subjects free of asthma at least until late childhood. Seven publications from five study populations fulfilled the inclusion criteria (one case-control and six cohort studies). All but one used markers of local traffic-related air pollution to characterize long-term exposure. Those studies reported similar associations with traffic-related air pollution. However, protocols, definitions of asthma, and exposure assignment were rather heterogeneous, and three publications relied on the same study; thus we abstain from meta-analytic summaries. Reported patterns of effect modification (e.g., by sex, atopy, or smoking) were inconsistent. Overall, the role of traffic-related air pollution in adult-onset asthma is less conclusive than in childhood asthma. Larger studies with more consistent definitions of phenotypes and exposure assessment for local traffic-related pollutants (e.g., ultrafine particles) are needed. Pooling existing cohorts such as in the ongoing European ESCAPE and TRANSPHORM consortia are promising steps. There is, however, a need for large-scale megacohorts to investigate these effects in standardized ways and to identify the most susceptible populations.
Related JoVE Video
Plasma and exhaled breath condensate nitrite-nitrate level in relation to environmental exposures in adults in the EGEA study.
Nitric Oxide
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
This study evaluated the associations between biological markers in the nitrate-nitrite-NO pathway and four environmental exposures among subjects examined in the second survey (2003-2007) of the French Epidemiological study on Genetics and Environment of Asthma (EGEA). Total nitrite and nitrate (NO(2)(-) /NO(3)(-)) levels were measured both in plasma and in exhaled breath condensate (EBC) in 949 adults. Smoking, diet and exposure to chlorine products were assessed using standardized questionnaires. Exposure to air pollutants was estimated by using geostatistical models. All estimates were obtained with generalized estimating equations for linear regression models. Median levels of NO(2)(-)/NO(3)(-) were 36.3 ?M (1st-3rd quartile: 25.7, 51.1) in plasma and 2.0 ?mol/mg proteins (1st-3rd quartile 0.9, 3.9) in EBC. After adjustment for asthma, age, sex and menopausal status, plasma NO(2)(-)/NO(3)(-) level increased with leafy vegetable consumption (above versus below median=0.04 (95%CI: 0.001, 0.07)) and decreased in smokers (versus non/ex-smokers=-0.08 (95%CI: -0.11, -0.04). EBC NO(2)(-)/NO(3)(-) level decreased in smokers (-0.08 (95%CI: -0.16, -0.001)) and with exposure to ambient O(3) concentration (above versus below median=-0.10 (95%CI: -0.17, -0.03)). Cured meat, chlorine products, PM(10) and NO(2) concentrations were not associated with NO(2)(-)/NO(3)(-) levels. Results suggest that potential modifiable environmental and behavioral risk factors may modify NO(2)(-)/NO(3)(-) levels in plasma and EBC according to the route of exposure.
Related JoVE Video
Understanding the complexity of IgE-related phenotypes from childhood to young adulthood: a Mechanisms of the Development of Allergy (MeDALL) seminar.
J. Allergy Clin. Immunol.
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Mechanisms of the Development of Allergy (MeDALL), a Seventh Framework Program European Union project, aims to generate novel knowledge on the mechanisms of initiation of allergy. Precise phenotypes of IgE-mediated allergic diseases will be defined in MeDALL. As part of MeDALL, a scientific seminar was held on January 24, 2011, to review current knowledge on the IgE-related phenotypes and to explore how a multidisciplinary effort could result in a new integrative translational approach. This article provides a summary of the meeting. It develops challenges in IgE-related phenotypes and new clinical and epidemiologic approaches to the investigation of allergic phenotypes, including cluster analysis, scale-free models, candidate biomarkers, and IgE microarrays; the particular case of severe asthma was reviewed. Then novel approaches to the IgE-associated phenotypes are reviewed from the individual mechanisms to the systems, including epigenetics, human in vitro immunology, systems biology, and animal models. The last chapter deals with the understanding of the population-based IgE-associated phenotypes in children and adolescents, including age effect in terms of maturation, observed effects of early-life exposures and shift of focus from early life to pregnancy, gene-environment interactions, cohort effects, and time trends in patients with allergic diseases. This review helps to define phenotypes of allergic diseases in MeDALL.
Related JoVE Video

What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.