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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Correction of rotational distortion for catheter-based en face OCT and OCT angiography.
Opt Lett
PUBLISHED: 11-01-2014
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We demonstrate a computationally efficient method for correcting the nonuniform rotational distortion (NURD) in catheter-based imaging systems to improve endoscopic en face optical coherence tomography (OCT) and OCT angiography. The method performs nonrigid registration using fiducial markers on the catheter to correct rotational speed variations. Algorithm performance is investigated with an ultrahigh-speed endoscopic OCT system and micromotor catheter. Scan nonuniformity is quantitatively characterized, and artifacts from rotational speed variations are significantly reduced. Furthermore, we present endoscopic en face OCT and OCT angiography images of human gastrointestinal tract in vivo to demonstrate the image quality improvement using the correction algorithm.
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Depth-encoded all-fiber swept source polarization sensitive OCT.
Biomed Opt Express
PUBLISHED: 09-01-2014
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Polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) is a functional extension of conventional OCT and can assess depth-resolved tissue birefringence in addition to intensity. Most existing PS-OCT systems are relatively complex and their clinical translation remains difficult. We present a simple and robust all-fiber PS-OCT system based on swept source technology and polarization depth-encoding. Polarization multiplexing was achieved using a polarization maintaining fiber. Polarization sensitive signals were detected using fiber based polarization beam splitters and polarization controllers were used to remove the polarization ambiguity. A simplified post-processing algorithm was proposed for speckle noise reduction relaxing the demand for phase stability. We demonstrated systems design for both ophthalmic and catheter-based PS-OCT. For ophthalmic imaging, we used an optical clock frequency doubling method to extend the imaging range of a commercially available short cavity light source to improve polarization depth-encoding. For catheter based imaging, we demonstrated 200 kHz PS-OCT imaging using a MEMS-tunable vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL) and a high speed micromotor imaging catheter. The system was demonstrated in human retina, finger and lip imaging, as well as ex vivo swine esophagus and cardiovascular imaging. The all-fiber PS-OCT is easier to implement and maintain compared to previous PS-OCT systems and can be more easily translated to clinical applications due to its robust design.
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Optical coherence tomography angiography of optic nerve head and parafovea in multiple sclerosis.
Br J Ophthalmol
PUBLISHED: 05-15-2014
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To investigate swept-source optical coherence tomography (OCT) angiography in the optic nerve head (ONH) and parafoveal regions in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS).
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Quantitative optical coherence tomography angiography of choroidal neovascularization in age-related macular degeneration.
Ophthalmology
PUBLISHED: 01-04-2014
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To detect and quantify choroidal neovascularization (CNV) in patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD) using optical coherence tomography (OCT) angiography.
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Swept source optical coherence microscopy using a 1310 nm VCSEL light source.
Opt Express
PUBLISHED: 08-14-2013
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We demonstrate high speed, swept source optical coherence microscopy (OCM) using a MEMS tunable vertical cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) light source. The light source had a sweep rate of 280 kHz, providing a bidirectional axial scan rate of 560 kHz. The sweep bandwidth was 117 nm centered at 1310 nm, corresponding to an axial resolution of 13.1 µm in air, corresponding to 8.1 µm (9.6 µm spectrally shaped) in tissue. Dispersion mismatch from different objectives was compensated numerically, enabling magnification and field of view to be easily changed. OCM images were acquired with transverse resolutions between 0.86 µm - 3.42 µm using interchangeable 40X, 20X and 10X objectives with ~600 µm x 600 µm, ~1 mm x 1 mm and ~2 mm x 2 mm field-of-view (FOV), respectively. Parasitic variations in path length with beam scanning were corrected numerically. These features enable swept source OCM to be integrated with a wide range of existing scanning microscopes. Large FOV mosaics were generated by serially acquiring adjacent overlapping microscopic fields and combining them in post-processing. Fresh human colon, thyroid and kidney specimens were imaged ex vivo and compared to matching histology sections, demonstrating the ability of OCM to image tissue specimens.
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Ultrahigh speed endoscopic optical coherence tomography using micromotor imaging catheter and VCSEL technology.
Biomed Opt Express
PUBLISHED: 07-01-2013
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We developed a micromotor based miniature catheter with an outer diameter of 3.2 mm for ultrahigh speed endoscopic swept source optical coherence tomography (OCT) using a vertical cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) at a 1 MHz axial scan rate. The micromotor can rotate a micro-prism at several hundred frames per second with less than 5 V drive voltage to provide fast and stable scanning, which is not sensitive to the bending of the catheter. The side-viewing probe can be pulled back to acquire a three-dimensional (3D) data set covering a large area on the specimen. The VCSEL provides a high axial scan rate to support dense sampling under high frame rate operation. Using a high speed data acquisition system, in vivo 3D-OCT imaging in the rabbit GI tract and ex vivo imaging of a human colon specimen with 8 ?m axial resolution, 8 ?m lateral resolution and 1.2 mm depth range in tissue at a frame rate of 400 fps was demonstrated.
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Reproducibility of a long-range swept-source optical coherence tomography ocular biometry system and comparison with clinical biometers.
Ophthalmology
PUBLISHED: 04-05-2013
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To demonstrate a novel swept source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT) imaging device using a vertical cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) capable of imaging the full eye length and to introduce a method using this device for noncontact ocular biometry. To compare the measurements of intraocular distances using this SS-OCT instrument with commercially available optical and ultrasound biometers. To evaluate the intersession reproducibility of measurements of intraocular distances using SS-OCT.
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High-precision, high-accuracy ultralong-range swept-source optical coherence tomography using vertical cavity surface emitting laser light source.
Opt Lett
PUBLISHED: 03-05-2013
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We demonstrate ultralong-range swept-source optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging using vertical cavity surface emitting laser technology. The ability to adjust laser parameters and high-speed acquisition enables imaging ranges from a few centimeters up to meters using the same instrument. We discuss the challenges of long-range OCT imaging. In vivo human-eye imaging and optical component characterization are presented. The precision and accuracy of OCT-based measurements are assessed and are important for ocular biometry and reproducible intraocular distance measurement before cataract surgery. Additionally, meter-range measurement of fiber length and multicentimeter-range imaging are reported. 3D visualization supports a class of industrial imaging applications of OCT.
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Phase-sensitive swept-source optical coherence tomography imaging of the human retina with a vertical cavity surface-emitting laser light source.
Opt Lett
PUBLISHED: 02-06-2013
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Despite the challenges in achieving high phase stability, Doppler swept-source/Fourier-domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) has advantages of less fringe washout and faster imaging speeds compared to spectral/Fourier-domain detection. This Letter demonstrates swept-source OCT with a vertical cavity surface-emitting laser light source at 400 kHz sweep rate for phase-sensitive Doppler imaging, measuring pulsatile total retinal blood flow with high sensitivity and phase stability. A robust, simple, and computationally efficient phase stabilization approach for phase-sensitive swept-source imaging is also presented.
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In vivo imaging of the rodent eye with swept source/Fourier domain OCT.
Biomed Opt Express
PUBLISHED: 01-14-2013
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Swept source/Fourier domain OCT is demonstrated for in vivo imaging of the rodent eye. Using commercial swept laser technology, we developed a prototype OCT imaging system for small animal ocular imaging operating in the 1050 nm wavelength range at an axial scan rate of 100 kHz with ~6 µm axial resolution. The high imaging speed enables volumetric imaging with high axial scan densities, measuring high flow velocities in vessels, and repeated volumetric imaging over time. The 1050 nm wavelength light provides increased penetration into tissue compared to standard commercial OCT systems at 850 nm. The long imaging range enables multiple operating modes for imaging the retina, posterior eye, as well as anterior eye and full eye length. A registration algorithm using orthogonally scanned OCT volumetric data sets which can correct motion on a per A-scan basis is applied to compensate motion and merge motion corrected volumetric data for enhanced OCT image quality. Ultrahigh speed swept source OCT is a promising technique for imaging the rodent eye, proving comprehensive information on the cornea, anterior segment, lens, vitreous, posterior segment, retina and choroid.
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Choriocapillaris and Choroidal Microvasculature Imaging with Ultrahigh Speed OCT Angiography.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
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We demonstrate in vivo choriocapillaris and choroidal microvasculature imaging in normal human subjects using optical coherence tomography (OCT). An ultrahigh speed swept source OCT prototype at 1060 nm wavelengths with a 400 kHz A-scan rate is developed for three-dimensional ultrahigh speed imaging of the posterior eye. OCT angiography is used to image three-dimensional vascular structure without the need for exogenous fluorophores by detecting erythrocyte motion contrast between OCT intensity cross-sectional images acquired rapidly and repeatedly from the same location on the retina. En face OCT angiograms of the choriocapillaris and choroidal vasculature are visualized by acquiring cross-sectional OCT angiograms volumetrically via raster scanning and segmenting the three-dimensional angiographic data at multiple depths below the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE). Fine microvasculature of the choriocapillaris, as well as tightly packed networks of feeding arterioles and draining venules, can be visualized at different en face depths. Panoramic ultra-wide field stitched OCT angiograms of the choriocapillaris spanning ?32 mm on the retina show distinct vascular structures at different fundus locations. Isolated smaller fields at the central fovea and ?6 mm nasal to the fovea at the depths of the choriocapillaris and Sattlers layer show vasculature structures consistent with established architectural morphology from histological and electron micrograph corrosion casting studies. Choriocapillaris imaging was performed in eight healthy volunteers with OCT angiograms successfully acquired from all subjects. These results demonstrate the feasibility of ultrahigh speed OCT for in vivo dye-free choriocapillaris and choroidal vasculature imaging, in addition to conventional structural imaging.
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Parafoveal Retinal Vascular Response to Pattern Visual Stimulation Assessed with OCT Angiography.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
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We used optical coherence tomography (OCT) angiography with a high-speed swept-source OCT system to investigate retinal blood flow changes induced by visual stimulation with a reversing checkerboard pattern. The split-spectrum amplitude-decorrelation angiography (SSADA) algorithm was used to quantify blood flow as measured with parafoveal flow index (PFI), which is proportional to the density of blood vessels and the velocity of blood flow in the parafoveal region of the macula. PFI measurements were taken in 15 second intervals during a 4 minute period consisting of 1 minute of baseline, 2 minutes with an 8 Hz reversing checkerboard pattern stimulation, and 1 minute without stimulation. PFI measurements increased 6.1±4.7% (p?=?.001) during the first minute of stimulation, with the most significant increase in PFI occurring 30 seconds into stimulation (p<0.001). These results suggest that pattern stimulation induces a change to retinal blood flow that can be reliably measured with OCT angiography.
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Piezoelectric-transducer-based miniature catheter for ultrahigh-speed endoscopic optical coherence tomography.
Biomed Opt Express
PUBLISHED: 06-02-2011
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We developed a piezoelectric-transducer- (PZT) based miniature catheter with an outer diameter of 3.5 mm for ultrahigh-speed endoscopic optical coherence tomography (OCT). A miniaturized PZT bender actuates a fiber and the beam is scanned through a GRIN lens and micro-prism to provide high-speed, side-viewing capability. The probe optics can be pulled back over a long distance to acquire three-dimensional (3D) data sets covering a large area. Imaging is performed with 11 ?m axial resolution in air (8 ?m in tissue) and 20 ?m transverse resolution, at 960 frames per second with a Fourier domain mode-locked laser operating at 480 kHz axial scan rate. Using a high-speed data acquisition system, endoscopic OCT imaging of the rabbit esophagus and colon in vivo and human colon specimens ex vivo is demonstrated.
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Total retinal blood flow measurement with ultrahigh speed swept source/Fourier domain OCT.
Biomed Opt Express
PUBLISHED: 03-16-2011
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Doppler OCT provides depth-resolved information on flow in biological tissues. In this article, we demonstrate ultrahigh speed swept source/Fourier domain OCT for visualization and quantitative assessment of retinal blood flow. Using swept laser technology, the system operated in the 1050-nm wavelength range at a high axial scan rate of 200 kHz. The rapid imaging speed not only enables volumetric imaging with high axial scan densities, but also enables measurement of high flow velocities in the central retinal vessels. Deep penetration in the optic nerve and lamina cribrosa was achieved by imaging at 1-µm wavelengths. By analyzing en-face images extracted from 3D Doppler data sets, absolute flow in single vessels as well as total retinal blood flow was measured using a simple and robust protocol that does not require measurement of Doppler angles. The results from measurements in healthy eyes suggest that ultrahigh speed swept source/Fourier domain OCT could be a promising technique for volumetric imaging of retinal vasculature and quantitation of retinal blood flow in a wide range of retinal diseases.
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Ultrahigh speed 1050nm swept source/Fourier domain OCT retinal and anterior segment imaging at 100,000 to 400,000 axial scans per second.
Opt Express
PUBLISHED: 10-14-2010
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We demonstrate ultrahigh speed swept source/Fourier domain ophthalmic OCT imaging using a short cavity swept laser at 100,000 - 400,000 axial scan rates. Several design configurations illustrate tradeoffs in imaging speed, sensitivity, axial resolution, and imaging depth. Variable rate A/D optical clocking is used to acquire linear-in-k OCT fringe data at 100 kHz axial scan rate with 5.3 um axial resolution in tissue. Fixed rate sampling at 1 GSPS achieves a 7.5mm imaging range in tissue with 6.0 um axial resolution at 100 kHz axial scan rate. A 200 kHz axial scan rate with 5.3 um axial resolution over 4mm imaging range is achieved by buffering the laser sweep. Dual spot OCT using two parallel interferometers achieves 400 kHz axial scan rate, almost 2X faster than previous 1050 nm ophthalmic results and 20X faster than current commercial instruments. Superior sensitivity roll-off performance is shown. Imaging is demonstrated in the human retina and anterior segment. Wide field 12x12 mm data sets include the macula and optic nerve head. Small area, high density imaging shows individual cone photoreceptors. The 7.5 mm imaging range configuration can show the cornea, iris, and anterior lens in a single image. These improvements in imaging speed and depth range provide important advantages for ophthalmic imaging. The ability to rapidly acquire 3D-OCT data over a wide field of view promises to simplify examination protocols. The ability to image fine structures can provide detailed information on focal pathologies. The large imaging range and improved image penetration at 1050 m wavelengths promises to improve performance for instrumentation which images both the retina and anterior eye. These advantages suggest that swept source OCT at 1050 nm wavelengths will play an important role in future ophthalmic instrumentation.
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Development of a fluorescence-based, ultra high-throughput screening platform for nanoliter-scale cytochrome p450 microarrays.
J Biomol Screen
PUBLISHED: 06-12-2009
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Cytochrome P450 enzyme (CYP450s) assays are critical enzymes in early-stage lead discovery and optimization in drug development. Currently available fluorescence-based reaction assays provide a rapid and reliable method for monitoring CYP450 enzyme activity but are confined to medium-throughput well-plate systems. The authors present a high-throughput, integrated screening platform for CYP450 assays combining enzyme encapsulation techniques, microarraying methods, and wide-field imaging. Alginate-containing microarrays consisting of up to 1134 CYP450 reaction elements were fabricated on functionalized glass slides (reaction volumes 20 to 80 nL, total enzyme content in pg) and imaged to yield endpoint activity, stability, and kinetic data. A charge-coupled device imager acquired quantitative, high-resolution images of a 20x20 mm area/snapshot using custom-built wide-field optics with telecentric lenses and easily interchangeable filter sets. The imaging system offered a broad dynamic intensity range (linear over 3 orders of magnitude) and sensitivity down to fluorochrome quantities of <5 fmols, with read accuracy similar to a laser scanner or a fluorescence plate reader but with higher throughput. Rapid image acquisition enabled analysis of CYP450 kinetics. Fluorogenic assays with CYP3A4, CYP2C9, and CYP2D6 on the alginate microarrays exhibited Z factors ranging from 0.75 to 0.85, sensitive detection of inhibitory compounds, and reactivity comparable to that in solution, thereby demonstrating the reliability and accuracy of the microarray platform. This system enables for the first time a significant miniaturization of CYP enzyme assays with significant conservation of assay reagents, greatly increased throughput, and no apparent loss of enzyme activity or assay sensitivity.
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Retinal, anterior segment and full eye imaging using ultrahigh speed swept source OCT with vertical-cavity surface emitting lasers.
Biomed Opt Express
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We demonstrate swept source OCT utilizing vertical-cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL) technology for in vivo high speed retinal, anterior segment and full eye imaging. The MEMS tunable VCSEL enables long coherence length, adjustable spectral sweep range and adjustable high sweeping rate (50-580 kHz axial scan rate). These features enable integration of multiple ophthalmic applications into one instrument. The operating modes of the device include: ultrahigh speed, high resolution retinal imaging (up to 580 kHz); high speed, long depth range anterior segment imaging (100 kHz) and ultralong range full eye imaging (50 kHz). High speed imaging enables wide-field retinal scanning, while increased light penetration at 1060 nm enables visualization of choroidal vasculature. Comprehensive volumetric data sets of the anterior segment from the cornea to posterior crystalline lens surface are also shown. The adjustable VCSEL sweep range and rate make it possible to achieve an extremely long imaging depth range of ~50 mm, and to demonstrate the first in vivo 3D OCT imaging spanning the entire eye for non-contact measurement of intraocular distances including axial eye length. Swept source OCT with VCSEL technology may be attractive for next generation integrated ophthalmic OCT instruments.
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Motion correction in optical coherence tomography volumes on a per A-scan basis using orthogonal scan patterns.
Biomed Opt Express
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High speed Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) has made it possible to rapidly capture densely sampled 3D volume data. One key application is the acquisition of high quality in vivo volumetric data sets of the human retina. Since the volume is acquired in a few seconds, eye movement during the scan process leads to distortion, which limits the accuracy of quantitative measurements using 3D OCT data. In this paper, we present a novel software based method to correct motion artifacts in OCT raster scans. Motion compensation is performed retrospectively using image registration algorithms on the OCT data sets themselves. Multiple, successively acquired volume scans with orthogonal fast scan directions are registered retrospectively in order to estimate and correct eye motion. Registration is performed by optimizing a large scale numerical problem as given by a global objective function using one dense displacement field for each input volume and special regularization based on the time structure of the acquisition process. After optimization, each volume is undistorted and a single merged volume is constructed that has superior signal quality compared to the input volumes. Experiments were performed using 3D OCT data from the macula and optic nerve head acquired with a high-speed ultra-high resolution 850 nm spectral OCT as well as wide field data acquired with a 1050 nm swept source OCT instrument. Evaluation of registration performance and result stability as well as visual inspection shows that the algorithm can correct for motion in all three dimensions and on a per A-scan basis. Corrected volumes do not show visible motion artifacts. In addition, merging multiple motion corrected and registered volumes leads to improved signal quality. These results demonstrate that motion correction and merging improves image quality and should also improve morphometric measurement accuracy from volumetric OCT data.
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Improved Detection Sensitivity of Line-Scanning Optical Coherence Microscopy.
IEEE J Sel Top Quantum Electron
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Optical coherence microscopy (OCM) is a promising technology for high-resolution cellular-level imaging in human tissues. Line-scanning OCM is a new form of OCM that utilizes line-field illumination for parallel detection. In this study, we demonstrate improved detection sensitivity by using an achromatic design for line-field generation. This system operates at 830-nm wavelength with 82-nm bandwidth. The measured axial resolution is 3.9 ?m in air (corresponding to ~2.9 ?m in tissue), and the transverse resolutions are 2.1 ?m along the line-field illumination direction and 1.7 ?m perpendicular to line illumination direction. The measured sensitivity is 98 dB with 25 line averages, resulting in an imaging speed of ~2 frames/s (516 lines/s). Real-time, cellular-level imaging of scattering tissues is demonstrated using human-colon specimens.
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Swept source/Fourier domain polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography with a passive polarization delay unit.
Opt Express
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Polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) is a functional imaging method that provides additional contrast using the light polarizing properties of a sample. This manuscript describes PS-OCT based on ultrahigh speed swept source / Fourier domain OCT operating at 1050 nm at 100 kHz axial scan rates using single mode fiber optics and a multiplexing approach. Unlike previously reported PS-OCT multiplexing schemes, the method uses a passive polarization delay unit and does not require active polarization modulating devices. This advance decreases system cost and avoids complex synchronization requirements. The polarization delay unit was implemented in the sample beam path in order to simultaneously illuminate the sample with two different polarization states. The orthogonal polarization components for the depth-multiplexed signals from the two input states were detected using dual balanced detection. PS-OCT images were computed using Jones calculus. 3D PS-OCT imaging was performed in the human and rat retina. In addition to standard OCT images, PS-OCT images were generated using contrast form birefringence and depolarization. Enhanced tissue discrimination as well as quantitative measurements of sample properties was demonstrated using the additional contrast and information contained in the PS-OCT images.
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Split-spectrum amplitude-decorrelation angiography with optical coherence tomography.
Opt Express
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Amplitude decorrelation measurement is sensitive to transverse flow and immune to phase noise in comparison to Doppler and other phase-based approaches. However, the high axial resolution of OCT makes it very sensitive to the pulsatile bulk motion noise in the axial direction. To overcome this limitation, we developed split-spectrum amplitude-decorrelation angiography (SSADA) to improve the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of flow detection. The full OCT spectrum was split into several narrower bands. Inter-B-scan decorrelation was computed using the spectral bands separately and then averaged. The SSADA algorithm was tested on in vivo images of the human macula and optic nerve head. It significantly improved both SNR for flow detection and connectivity of microvascular network when compared to other amplitude-decorrelation algorithms.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.