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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Subthreshold psychotic symptoms in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome.
J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry
PUBLISHED: 06-19-2014
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Chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS) confers 25% risk for psychosis and is an invaluable window for understanding the neurobiological substrate of psychosis risk. The Structured Interview for Prodromal Syndromes (SIPS) is well validated in nondeleted populations for detecting clinical risk but has only recently been applied to 22q11DS. We assessed the largest 22q11DS cohort to date and report on SIPS implementation and symptoms elicited.
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Further phenotype description, genotype characterization in patients with de novo interstitial deletion on 2p23.2-24.1.
Am. J. Med. Genet. A
PUBLISHED: 04-03-2014
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Interstitial deletions of the distal part of chromosome 2p seem to be rarely identified or reported: to date, only nine distinct patients have been published. The last three patients were diagnosed with the use of more recent molecular karyotyping technology (SNP array). We report on the natural history of an 8-year-old boy with dysmorphic features, postnatal overgrowth, microcephaly, generalized hypotonia, and global developmental delay. The diagnosis was accomplished by SNP array investigation that led to the identification of a de novo 7.4?Mb deletion of 2p23.2-p24.1. The present patient also developed a nonsyndromic auditory neuropathy. Since the deletion encompassed the OTOF gene, this haploinsufficiency suggests second allele sequencing as a possible cause (DFNB9). We describe the phenotype of the patient and review reports in patients with del 2p23 subsequent to the advent of the genomic era. At the time of identification of "new" micro- deletion and -duplication syndromes, the present report adds to the description of phenotype in patients with del(2)p(23.2;24.1) and the 2p23.2 region in particular.
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Analysis of the t(3;8) of hereditary renal cell carcinoma: a palindrome-mediated translocation.
Cancer Genet
PUBLISHED: 02-07-2014
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It has emerged that palindrome-mediated genomic instability generates DNA-based rearrangements. The presence of palindromic AT-rich repeats (PATRRs) at the translocation breakpoints suggested a palindrome-mediated mechanism in the generation of several recurrent constitutional rearrangements: the t(11;22), t(17;22), and t(8;22). To date, all reported PATRR-mediated translocations include the PATRR on chromosome 22 (PATRR22) as a translocation partner. Here, the constitutional rearrangement, t(3;8)(p14.2;q24.1), segregating with renal cell carcinoma in two families, is examined. The chromosome 8 breakpoint lies in PATRR8 in the first intron of the RNF139 (TRC8) gene, whereas the chromosome 3 breakpoint is located in an AT-rich palindromic sequence in intron 3 of the FHIT gene (PATRR3). Thus, the t(3;8) is the first PATRR-mediated, recurrent, constitutional translocation that does not involve PATRR22. Furthermore, we detect de novo translocations similar to the t(11;22) and t(8;22), involving PATRR3 in normal sperm. The breakpoint on chromosome 3 is in proximity to FRA3B, the most common fragile site in the human genome and a site of frequent deletions in tumor cells. However, the lack of involvement of PATRR3 sequence in numerous FRA3B-related deletions suggests that there are several different DNA sequence-based etiologies responsible for chromosome 3p14.2 genomic rearrangements.
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Contribution of congenital heart disease to neuropsychiatric outcome in school-age children with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome.
Am. J. Med. Genet. B Neuropsychiatr. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 09-23-2013
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Children with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS) present with congenital heart disease (CHD) and high prevalence of psychiatric disorders and neurocognitive deficits. Although CHD has been implicated in neurodevelopment, its role in the neuropsychiatric outcome in 22q11DS is poorly understood. We investigated whether CHD contributes to the high prevalence of psychiatric disorders and neurocognitive impairments in 22q11DS. Fifty-four children ages 8-14 years with 22q11DS and 16 age-matched non-deleted children with CHD participated. They were assessed using semi-structured interviews and a Computerized Neurocognitive Battery. CHD status was assessed using available medical records. Prevalence of psychiatric disorders and cognitive profiles were compared among the groups. There were no significant differences between the prevalence of psychiatric disorders in the 22q11DS with and without CHD. In 22q11DS with CHD, the prevalence rates were 41% anxiety disorders, 37% ADHD and 71% psychosis spectrum. In 22q11DS without CHD, the rates were 33% anxiety disorders, 41% ADHD and 64% psychosis spectrum. In comparison, the non-deleted CHD group had lower rates of psychopathology (25% anxiety disorders, 6% ADHD, and 13% psychosis spectrum). Similarly, the 22q11DS groups, regardless of CHD status, had significantly greater neurocognitive deficits across multiple domains, compared to the CHD-only group. We conclude that CHD in this sample of children with 22q11.2DS does not have a major impact on the prevalence of psychiatric disorders and is not associated with increased neurocognitive deficits. These findings suggest that the 22q11.2 deletion status itself may confer significant neuropsychiatric vulnerability in this population. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
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A dynamic database of microarray-characterized cell lines with various cytogenetic and genomic backgrounds.
G3 (Bethesda)
PUBLISHED: 05-14-2013
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The Human Genetic Cell Repository sponsored by the National Institute of General Medical Sciences (NIGMS) contains more than 11,000 cell lines and DNA samples collected from numerous individuals. All of these cell lines and DNA samples are categorized into several collections representing a variety of disease states, chromosomal abnormalities, heritable diseases, distinct human populations, and apparently healthy individuals. Many of these cell lines have previously been studied with detailed conventional cytogenetic analyses, including G-banded karyotyping and fluorescence in situ hybridization. This work was conducted by investigators at submitting institutions and scientists at Coriell Institute for Medical Research, where the NIGMS Repository is hosted. Recently, approximately 900 cell lines, mostly chosen from the Chromosomal Aberrations and Heritable Diseases collections, have been further characterized in detail at the Coriell Institute using the Affymetrix Genome-Wide Human SNP Array 6.0 to detect copy number variations and copy number neutral loss of heterozygosity. A database containing detailed cytogenetic and genomic information for these cell lines has been constructed and is freely available through several sources, such as the NIGMS Repository website and the University of California at Santa Cruz Genome Browser. As additional cell lines are analyzed and subsequently added into it, the database will be maintained dynamically.
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22q11.2 deletions in patients with conotruncal defects: data from 1,610 consecutive cases.
Pediatr Cardiol
PUBLISHED: 03-26-2013
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The 22q11.2 deletion syndrome is characterized by multiple congenital anomalies including conotruncal cardiac defects. Identifying the patient with a 22q11.2 deletion (22q11del) can be challenging because many extracardiac features become apparent later in life. We sought to better define the cardiac phenotype associated with a 22q11del to help direct genetic testing. 1,610 patients with conotruncal defects were sequentially tested for a 22q11del. The counts and frequencies of primary lesions and cardiac features were tabulated for those with and those without a 22q11del. Logistic regression models investigated cardiac features that predicted deletion status in tetralogy of Fallot (TOF). Deletion frequency varied by primary anatomic phenotype. Regardless of the cardiac diagnosis, a concurrent aortic arch anomaly (AAA) was strongly associated with deletion status [odds ratio (OR), 5.07; 95 % confidence interval (CI), 3.66-7.04]. In the TOF subset, the strongest predictor of deletion status was an AAA (OR, 3.14; 95 % CI 1.87-5.27; p < 0.001), followed by pulmonary valve atresia (OR, 2.03; 95 % CI 1.02-4.02; p = 0.04). Among those with double-outlet right ventricle and transposition of the great arteries, only those with an AAA had a 22q11del. However, 5 % of the patients with an isolated conoventricular ventricular septal defect and normal aortic arch anatomy had a 22q11del, whereas no one with an interrupted aortic arch type A had a 22q11del. A subset of patients with conotruncal defects are at risk for a 22q11del. A concurrent AAA increases the risk regardless of the intracardiac anatomy. These findings help to direct genetic screening for the 22q11.2 deletion syndrome in the cardiac patient.
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Two sequential cleavage reactions on cruciform DNA structures cause palindrome-mediated chromosomal translocations.
Nat Commun
PUBLISHED: 02-11-2013
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Gross chromosomal rearrangements (GCRs), such as translocations, deletions or inversions, are often generated by illegitimate repair between two DNA breakages at regions with nucleotide sequences that might potentially adopt a non-B DNA conformation. We previously established a plasmid-based model system that recapitulates palindrome-mediated recurrent chromosomal translocations in humans, and demonstrated that cruciform DNA conformation is required for the translocation-like rearrangements. Here we show that two sequential reactions that cleave the cruciform structures give rise to the translocation: GEN1-mediated resolution that cleaves diagonally at the four-way junction of the cruciform and Artemis-mediated opening of the subsequently formed hairpin ends. Indeed, translocation products in human sperm reveal the remnants of this two-step mechanism. These two intrinsic pathways that normally fulfil vital functions independently, Holliday-junction resolution in homologous recombination and coding joint formation in rearrangement of antigen-receptor genes, act upon the unusual DNA conformation in concert and lead to a subset of recurrent GCRs in humans.
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Enhanced maternal origin of the 22q11.2 deletion in velocardiofacial and DiGeorge syndromes.
Am. J. Hum. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 01-31-2013
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Velocardiofacial and DiGeorge syndromes, also known as 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS), are congenital-anomaly disorders caused by a de novo hemizygous 22q11.2 deletion mediated by meiotic nonallelic homologous recombination events between low-copy repeats, also known as segmental duplications. Although previous studies exist, each was of small size, and it remains to be determined whether there are parent-of-origin biases for the de novo 22q11.2 deletion. To address this question, we genotyped a total of 389 DNA samples from 22q11DS-affected families. A total of 219 (56%) individuals with 22q11DS had maternal origin and 170 (44%) had paternal origin of the de novo deletion, which represents a statistically significant bias for maternal origin (p = 0.0151). Combined with many smaller, previous studies, 465 (57%) individuals had maternal origin and 345 (43%) had paternal origin, amounting to a ratio of 1.35 or a 35% increase in maternal compared to paternal origin (p = 0.000028). Among 1,892 probands with the de novo 22q11.2 deletion, the average maternal age at time of conception was 29.5, and this is similar to data for the general population in individual countries. Of interest, the female recombination rate in the 22q11.2 region was about 1.6-1.7 times greater than that for males, suggesting that for this region in the genome, enhanced meiotic recombination rates, as well as other as-of-yet undefined 22q11.2-specific features, could be responsible for the observed excess in maternal origin.
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High-Resolution genomic arrays identify CNVs that phenocopy the chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome.
Hum. Mutat.
PUBLISHED: 12-20-2011
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The 22q11 Deletion Syndrome includes the overlapping phenotypes of DiGeorge/Velocardiofacial Syndromes, characterized by conotruncal heart defects, cleft palate, thymus, and parathyroid gland dysplasia. The majority (90%) of patients harbor detectable chr22q11.2 deletions, but a genetic etiology for the remainder of patients without a deletion can remain undefined despite major birth defects. We analyzed DNA from eight patients with normal 22q11 FISH studies by high-density single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) arrays and identified potentially pathogenic copy number variants (CNVs) in four of eight patients. Two patients showed large CNVs in regions of known genomic disorders: one a deletion of distal chr22q11.2 and the other a duplication of chr5q35. A 3-Mb deletion of chr19p13.3 that includes a gene associated with conotruncal heart defects was found in a third patient. Two potentially pathogenic CNVs were found in a fourth patient: a large heterozygous deletion of chr6p24 and a smaller duplication of chr9p24. Our findings support a recent consensus statement advocating chromosomal microarray analysis as a first-line diagnostic approach for patients with multiple congenital anomalies. In patients with phenotypes suggestive of the 22q11.2 syndrome spectrum and normal FISH, microarray analysis can uncover the molecular basis of other genomic disorders whose features overlap those of 22q11.2 deletions.
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Computerized neurocognitive profile in young people with 22q11.2 deletion syndrome compared to youths with schizophrenia and at-risk for psychosis.
Am. J. Med. Genet. B Neuropsychiatr. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 08-02-2011
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Adults with 22q11.2 Deletion syndrome (22q11DS) have increased prevalence of schizophrenia features. Our goal is to compare the neurocognitive profile in 22q11DS, schizophrenia and individuals at risk for schizophrenia. Twenty-one 22q11DS patients (8-32 years, mean 14.9 years, 15M, 6F) were matched to four comparison groups on age: low risk (n?=?21), first-degree family members of schizophrenia patients (genetic risk, n?=?20), individuals exhibiting putatively prodromal symptoms (clinical risk, n?=?19), and patients with schizophrenia (n?=?21). All participants received semi-structured interviews [Diagnostic Interview for Genetic Studies (DIGS) and the Structured Interview for Prodromal Syndromes (SIPS)], and a computerized neurocognitive battery (CNB) measuring the following domains: Abstraction and Mental Flexibility, Attention, Working Memory, Verbal Memory, Face Memory, Spatial Memory, Language, Spatial Processing, Sensorimotor Dexterity, and Emotion Processing. Sixty percent of 22q11DS participants met SIPS criteria for prodromal symptoms and one participant met criteria for paranoid schizophrenia. Thirty-eight percent met criteria for Depressive Disorders. All 22q11DS participants successfully completed the CNB. 22q11DS participants were significantly less accurate in nearly all domains, but had similar speed of response compared to the other groups. Their profile resembled that of the psychosis groups in accuracy and speed, except for more pronounced deficits in accuracy for face memory and emotion processing. Subthreshold psychotic symptoms are present in a high proportion of 22q11DS participants. Deficits shown in the CNB are more pronounced for accuracy than speed relative to the psychosis groups with similar profiles. Similar deficits have been described in the 22q11DS population using non-computerized measures, which require increased testing time.
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DNA secondary structure is influenced by genetic variation and alters susceptibility to de novo translocation.
Mol Cytogenet
PUBLISHED: 06-11-2011
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Cumulative evidence suggests that DNA secondary structures impact DNA replication, transcription and genomic rearrangements. One of the best studied examples is the recurrent constitutional t(11;22) in humans that is mediated by potentially cruciform-forming sequences at the breakpoints, palindromic AT-rich repeats (PATRRs). We previously demonstrated that polymorphisms of PATRR sequences affect the frequency of de novo t(11;22)s in sperm samples from normal healthy males. These studies were designed to determine whether PATRR polymorphisms affect DNA secondary structure, thus leading to variation in translocation frequency.
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Genotype and cardiovascular phenotype correlations with TBX1 in 1,022 velo-cardio-facial/DiGeorge/22q11.2 deletion syndrome patients.
Hum. Mutat.
PUBLISHED: 04-15-2011
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Haploinsufficiency of TBX1, encoding a T-box transcription factor, is largely responsible for the physical malformations in velo-cardio-facial /DiGeorge/22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS) patients. Cardiovascular malformations in these patients are highly variable, raising the question as to whether DNA variations in the TBX1 locus on the remaining allele of 22q11.2 could be responsible. To test this, a large sample size is needed. The TBX1 gene was sequenced in 360 consecutive 22q11DS patients. Rare and common variations were identified. We did not detect enrichment in rare SNP (single nucleotide polymorphism) number in those with or without a congenital heart defect. One exception was that there was increased number of very rare SNPs between those with normal heart anatomy compared to those with right-sided aortic arch or persistent truncus arteriosus, suggesting potentially protective roles in the SNPs for these phenotype-enrichment groups. Nine common SNPs (minor allele frequency, MAF > 0.05) were chosen and used to genotype the entire cohort of 1,022 22q11DS subjects. We did not find a correlation between common SNPs or haplotypes and cardiovascular phenotype. This work demonstrates that common DNA variations in TBX1 do not explain variable cardiovascular expression in 22q11DS patients, implicating existence of modifiers in other genes on 22q11.2 or elsewhere in the genome.
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A palindrome-mediated recurrent translocation with 3:1 meiotic nondisjunction: the t(8;22)(q24.13;q11.21).
Am. J. Hum. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 05-14-2010
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Palindrome-mediated genomic instability has been associated with chromosomal translocations, including the recurrent t(11;22)(q23;q11). We report a syndrome characterized by extremity anomalies, mild dysmorphia, and intellectual impairment caused by 3:1 meiotic segregation of a previously unrecognized recurrent palindrome-mediated rearrangement, the t(8;22)(q24.13;q11.21). There are at least ten prior reports of this translocation, and nearly identical PATRR8 and PATRR22 breakpoints were validated in several of these published cases. PCR analysis of sperm DNA from healthy males indicates that the t(8;22) arises de novo during gametogenesis in some, but not all, individuals. Furthermore, demonstration that de novo PATRR8-to-PATRR11 translocations occur in sperm suggests that palindrome-mediated translocation is a universal mechanism producing chromosomal rearrangements.
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Polymorphisms of the 22q11.2 breakpoint region influence the frequency of de novo constitutional t(11;22)s in sperm.
Hum. Mol. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 04-13-2010
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The constitutional t(11;22) is the most frequent recurrent non-Robertsonian translocation in humans, the breakpoints of which are located within palindromic AT-rich repeats on 11q23 and 22q11 (PATRR11 and PATRR22). Genetic variation of the PATRR11 was found to affect de novo t(11;22) translocation frequency in sperm derived from normal healthy males, suggesting the hypothesis that polymorphisms of the PATRR22 might also influence the translocation frequency. Although the complicated structure of the PATRR22 locus prevented determining the genotype of the PATRR22 in each individual, genotyping of flanking markers as well as identification of rare variants allowed us to demonstrate an association between the PATRR22 allele type and the translocation frequency. We found that size and symmetry of the PATRR22 affect the de novo translocation frequency, which is lower for the shorter or more asymmetric versions. These data lend support to our hypothesis that the PATRRs form secondary structures in the nucleus that induce genomic instability leading to the recurrent translocation.
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Paternal origin of the de novo constitutional t(11;22)(q23;q11).
Eur. J. Hum. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 02-24-2010
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The constitutional t(11;22)(q23;q11) is a well-known recurrent non-Robertsonian translocation in humans. Although translocations generally occur in a random fashion, the break points of t(11;22)s are concentrated within several hundred base pairs on 11q23 and 22q11. These regions are characterized by palindromic AT-rich repeats (PATRRs), which appear to be responsible for the genomic instability. Translocation-specific PCR detects de novo t(11;22)s in sperm from healthy males at a frequency of 1/10(4)-10(5), but never in lymphoblasts, fibroblasts or other human somatic cell lines. This suggests that the generation of t(11;22) rearrangement is linked to gametogenesis, although female germ cells have not been tested. Here, we have studied eight cases of de novo t(11;22) to determine the parental origin of the translocation using the polymorphisms on the relevant PATRRs. All of the eight translocations were found to be of paternal origin. This result implicates a possible novel mechanism of sperm-specific generation of palindrome-mediated chromosomal translocations.
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Interrupted aortic arch type B in A patient with cat eye syndrome.
Arq. Bras. Cardiol.
PUBLISHED: 07-25-2009
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We report a patient with cat eye syndrome and interrupted aortic arch type B, a typical finding in the 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. Chromosomal analysis and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) showed a supernumerary bisatellited isodicentric marker chromosome derived from chromosome 22. The segment from 22pter to 22q11.2 in the supernumerary chromosome found in our patient does not overlap with the region deleted in patients with the 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. However, the finding of an interrupted aortic arch type B is unusual in CES, although it is a frequent heart defect in the 22q11 deletion syndrome.
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Phenotypic delineation of Emanuel syndrome (supernumerary derivative 22 syndrome): Clinical features of 63 individuals.
Am. J. Med. Genet. A
PUBLISHED: 07-17-2009
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Emanuel syndrome is characterized by multiple congenital anomalies and developmental disability. It is caused by the presence of a supernumerary derivative chromosome that contains material from chromosomes 11 and 22. The origin of this imbalance is 3:1 malsegregation of a parental balanced translocation between chromosomes 11 and 22, which is the most common recurrent reciprocal translocation in humans. Little has been published on the clinical features of this syndrome since the 1980s and information on natural history is limited. We designed a questionnaire to collect information from families recruited through an international online support group, Chromosome 22 Central. Data gathered include information on congenital anomalies, medical and surgical history, developmental and behavioral issues, and current abilities. We received information on 63 individuals with Emanuel syndrome, ranging in age from newborn to adulthood. As previously recognized, congenital anomalies were common, the most frequent being ear pits (76%), micrognathia (60%), heart malformations (57%), and cleft palate (54%). Our data suggest that vision and hearing impairment, seizures, failure to thrive and recurrent infections, particularly otitis media, are common in this syndrome. Psychomotor development is uniformly delayed, however the majority of individuals (over 70%) eventually learn to walk with support. Language development and ability for self-care are also very impaired. This study provides new information on the clinical spectrum and natural history of Emanuel syndrome for families and physicians caring for these individuals.
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Impaired DNA replication prompts deletions within palindromic sequences, but does not induce translocations in human cells.
Hum. Mol. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 06-11-2009
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Palindromic regions are unstable and susceptible to deletion in prokaryotes and eukaryotes possibly due to stalled or slow replication. In the human genome, they also appear to become partially or completely deleted, while two palindromic AT-rich repeats (PATRR) contribute to known recurrent constitutional translocations. To explore the mechanism that causes the development of palindrome instabilities in humans, we compared the incidence of de novo translocations and deletions at PATRRs in human cells. Using a highly sensitive PCR assay that can detect single molecules, de novo deletions were detected neither in human somatic cells nor in sperm. However, deletions were detected at low frequency in cultured cell lines. Inhibition of DNA replication by administration of siRNA against the DNA polymerase alpha 1 (POLA1) gene or introduction of POLA inhibitors increased the frequency. This is in contrast to PATRR-mediated translocations that were never detected in similar conditions but were observed frequently in human sperm samples. Further deletions were found to take place during both leading- and lagging-strand synthesis. Our data suggest that stalled or slow replication induces deletions within PATRRs, but that other mechanisms might contribute to PATRR-mediated recurrent translocations in humans.
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Evaluation of potential modifiers of the cardiac phenotype in the 22q11.2 deletion syndrome.
Birth Defects Res. Part A Clin. Mol. Teratol.
PUBLISHED: 04-15-2009
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The phenotype associated with deletion of the 22q11.2 chromosomal region is highly variable, yet little is known about the source of this variability. Cardiovascular anomalies, including tetralogy of Fallot, truncus arteriosus, interrupted aortic arch type B, perimembranous ventricular septal defects, and aortic arch anomalies, occur in approximately 75% of individuals with a 22q11.2 deletion.
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Proline affects brain function in 22q11DS children with the low activity COMT 158 allele.
Neuropsychopharmacology
PUBLISHED: 03-31-2009
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The association between the 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS) and psychiatric disorders, particularly psychosis, suggests a causal relationship between 22q11DS genes and abnormal brain function. The genes catechol-O-methyl-transferase (COMT) and proline dehydrogenase both reside within the commonly deleted region of 22q11.2. COMT activity and proline levels may therefore be altered in 22q11DS individuals. Associations of both COMT(158) genotype and elevated serum proline levels with abnormal brain function have been reported. Fifty-six 22q11DS children and 75 healthy controls were assessed on physiological measures of brain function, including prepulse inhibition (PPI) of startle, P50 auditory sensory gating and smooth pursuit eye movements (SPEM). COMT(158) genotype and plasma proline levels were determined in the 22q11DS children. We hypothesized an interaction between the COMT(158) genotype and proline, predicting the strongest negative effect of high proline on brain function to occur in 22q11DS children who are carriers of the COMT(met) allele. Of the three physiological measures, only SPEM and PPI were abnormal in the patient sample. With regard to the SPEM performance, there was a significant interaction between the COMT(158) genotype and proline level with significantly decreased SPEM performance in children with high plasma proline levels and the low activity COMT(met) allele. A similar interaction effect was not observed with regard to PPI. These findings are consistent with a model in which elevated proline negatively affects brain function by an increase in dopamine in the prefrontal cortex. 22q11DS patients with low dopamine catabolic capacity are therefore especially vulnerable to this functional disruption.
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Alterations in midline cortical thickness and gyrification patterns mapped in children with 22q11.2 deletions.
Cereb. Cortex
PUBLISHED: 03-10-2009
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The 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (velocardiofacial/DiGeorge syndrome) is a neurogenetic condition associated with visuospatial deficits, as well as elevated rates of attentional disturbance, mood disorder, and psychosis. Previously, we detected pronounced cortical thinning in superior parietal and right parieto-occipital cortices in patients with this syndrome, regions critical for visuospatial processing. Here we applied cortical pattern-matching algorithms to structural magnetic resonance images obtained from 21 children with confirmed 22q11.2 deletions (ages 8-17) and 13 demographically matched comparison subjects, in order to map cortical thickness across the medial hemispheric surfaces. In addition, cortical models were remeshed in frequency space to compute their surface complexity. Cortical maps revealed a pattern of localized thinning in the ventromedial occipital-temporal cortex, critical for visuospatial representation, and the anterior cingulate, a key area for attentional control. However, children with 22q11.2DS showed significantly increased gyral complexity bilaterally in occipital cortex. Regional gray matter volumes, particularly in medial frontal cortex, were strongly correlated with both verbal and nonverbal cognitive functions. These findings suggest that aberrant parieto-occipital brain development, as evidenced by both increased complexity and cortical thinning in these regions, may be a neural substrate for the deficits in visuospatial and numerical understanding characteristic of this syndrome.
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Chromosomal instability mediated by non-B DNA: cruciform conformation and not DNA sequence is responsible for recurrent translocation in humans.
Genome Res.
PUBLISHED: 01-05-2009
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Chromosomal aberrations have been thought to be random events. However, recent findings introduce a new paradigm in which certain DNA segments have the potential to adopt unusual conformations that lead to genomic instability and nonrandom chromosomal rearrangement. One of the best-studied examples is the palindromic AT-rich repeat (PATRR), which induces recurrent constitutional translocations in humans. Here, we established a plasmid-based model that promotes frequent intermolecular rearrangements between two PATRRs in HEK293 cells. In this model system, the proportion of PATRR plasmid that extrudes a cruciform structure correlates to the levels of rearrangement. Our data suggest that PATRR-mediated translocations are attributable to unusual DNA conformations that confer a common pathway for chromosomal rearrangements in humans.
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Hemizygous mutations in SNAP29 unmask autosomal recessive conditions and contribute to atypical findings in patients with 22q11.2DS.
J. Med. Genet.
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22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS) is the most common microdeletion disorder, affecting an estimated 1?:?2000-4000 live births. Patients with 22q11.2DS have a broad spectrum of phenotypic abnormalities which generally includes congenital cardiac abnormalities, palatal anomalies, and immunodeficiency. Additional findings, such as skeletal anomalies and autoimmune disorders, can confer significant morbidity in a subset of patients. 22q11.2DS is a contiguous gene DS and over 40 genes are deleted in patients; thus deletion of several genes within this region contributes to the clinical features. Mutations outside or on the remaining 22q11.2 allele are also known to modify the phenotype.
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A candidate gene approach to identify modifiers of the palatal phenotype in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome patients.
Int. J. Pediatr. Otorhinolaryngol.
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Palatal anomalies are one of the identifying features of 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11.2DS) affecting about one third of patients. To identify genetic variants that increase the risk of cleft or palatal anomalies in 22q11.2DS patients, we performed a candidate gene association study in 101 patients with 22q11.2DS genotyped with the Affymetrix genome-wide human SNP array 6.0.
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Overt cleft palate phenotype and TBX1 genotype correlations in velo-cardio-facial/DiGeorge/22q11.2 deletion syndrome patients.
Am. J. Med. Genet. A
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Velo-cardio-facial syndrome/DiGeorge syndrome, also known as 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (22q11DS) is the most common microdeletion syndrome, with an estimated incidence of 1/2,000-1/4,000 live births. Approximately 9-11% of patients with this disorder have an overt cleft palate (CP), but the genetic factors responsible for CP in the 22q11DS subset are unknown. The TBX1 gene, a member of the T-box transcription factor gene family, lies within the 22q11.2 region that is hemizygous in patients with 22q11DS. Inactivation of one allele of Tbx1 in the mouse does not result in CP, but inactivation of both alleles does. Based on these data, we hypothesized that DNA variants in the remaining allele of TBX1 may confer risk to CP in patients with 22q11DS. To test the hypothesis, we evaluated TBX1 exon sequencing (n = 360) and genotyping data (n = 737) with respect to presence (n = 54) or absence (n = 683) of CP in patients with 22q11DS. Two upstream SNPs (rs4819835 and rs5748410) showed individual evidence for association but they were not significant after correction for multiple testing. Associations were not identified between DNA variants and haplotypes in 22q11DS patients with CP. Overall, this study indicates that common DNA variants in TBX1 may be nominally causative for CP in patients with 22q11DS. This raises the possibility that genes elsewhere on the remaining allele of 22q11.2 or in the genome could be relevant.
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Chromosomal translocations and palindromic AT-rich repeats.
Curr. Opin. Genet. Dev.
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Repetitive DNA sequences constitute 30% of the human genome, and are often sites of genomic rearrangement. Recently, it has been found that several constitutional translocations, especially those that involve chromosome 22, take place utilizing palindromic sequences on 22q11 and on the partner chromosome. Analysis of translocation junction fragments shows that the breakpoints of such palindrome-mediated translocations are localized at the center of palindromic AT-rich repeats (PATRRs). The presence of PATRRs at the breakpoints indicates a palindrome-mediated mechanism involved in the generation of these constitutional translocations. Identification of these PATRR-mediated translocations suggests a universal pathway for gross chromosomal rearrangement in the human genome. De novo occurrences of PATRR-mediated translocations can be detected by PCR in normal sperm samples but not somatic cells. Polymorphisms of various PATRRs influence their propensity for adopting a secondary structure, which in turn affects de novo translocation frequency. We propose that the PATRRs form an unstable secondary structure, which leads to double-strand breaks at the center of the PATRR. The double-strand breaks appear to be followed by a non-homologous end-joining repair pathway, ultimately leading to the translocations. This review considers recent findings concerning the mechanism of meiosis-specific, PATRR-mediated translocations.
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JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.