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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
N-acylated peptides derived from human lactoferricin perturb organization of cardiolipin and phosphatidylethanolamine in cell membranes and induce defects in Escherichia coli cell division.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
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Two types of recently described antibacterial peptides derived from human lactoferricin, either nonacylated or N-acylated, were studied for their different interaction with membranes of Escherichia coli in vivo and in model systems. Electron microscopy revealed striking effects on the bacterial membrane as both peptide types induced formation of large membrane blebs. Electron and fluorescence microscopy, however demonstrated that only the N-acylated peptides partially induced the generation of oversized cells, which might reflect defects in cell-division. Further a different distribution of cardiolipin domains on the E. coli membrane was shown only in the presence of the N-acylated peptides. The lipid was distributed over the whole bacterial cell surface, whereas cardiolipin in untreated and nonacylated peptide-treated cells was mainly located at the septum and poles. Studies with bacterial membrane mimics, such as cardiolipin or phosphatidylethanolamine revealed that both types of peptides interacted with the negatively charged lipid cardiolipin. The nonacylated peptides however induced segregation of cardiolipin into peptide-enriched and peptide-poor lipid domains, while the N-acylated peptides promoted formation of many small heterogeneous domains. Only N-acylated peptides caused additional severe effects on the main phase transition of liposomes composed of pure phosphatidylethanolamine, while both peptide types inhibited the lamellar to hexagonal phase transition. Lipid mixtures of phosphatidylethanolamine and cardiolipin revealed anionic clustering by all peptide types. However additional strong perturbation of the neutral lipids was only seen with the N-acylated peptides. Nuclear magnetic resonance demonstrated different conformational arrangement of the N-acylated peptide in anionic and zwitterionic micelles revealing possible mechanistic differences in their action on different membrane lipids. We hypothesized that both peptides kill bacteria by interacting with bacterial membrane lipids but only N-acylated peptides interact with both charged cardiolipin and zwitterionic phosphatidylethanolamine resulting in remodeling of the natural phospholipid domains in the E. coli membrane that leads to defects in cell division.
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Structural features governing the activity of lactoferricin-derived peptides that act in synergy with antibiotics against Pseudomonas aeruginosa in vitro and in vivo.
Antimicrob. Agents Chemother.
PUBLISHED: 10-18-2010
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Pseudomonas aeruginosa is naturally resistant to many antibiotics, and infections caused by this organism are a serious threat, especially to hospitalized patients. The intrinsic low permeability of P. aeruginosa to antibiotics results from the coordinated action of several mechanisms, such as the presence of restrictive porins and the expression of multidrug efflux pump systems. Our goal was to develop antimicrobial peptides with an improved bacterial membrane-permeabilizing ability, so that they enhance the antibacterial activity of antibiotics. We carried out a structure activity relationship analysis to investigate the parameters that govern the permeabilizing activity of short (8- to 12-amino-acid) lactoferricin-derived peptides. We used a new class of constitutional and sequence-dependent descriptors called PEDES (peptide descriptors from sequence) that allowed us to predict (Spearmans ? = 0.74; P < 0.001) the permeabilizing activity of a new peptide generation. To study if peptide-mediated permeabilization could neutralize antibiotic resistance mechanisms, the most potent peptides were combined with antibiotics, and the antimicrobial activities of the combinations were determined on P. aeruginosa strains whose mechanisms of resistance to those antibiotics had been previously characterized. A subinhibitory concentration of compound P2-15 or P2-27 sensitized P. aeruginosa to most classes of antibiotics tested and counteracted several mechanisms of antibiotic resistance, including loss of the OprD porin and overexpression of several multidrug efflux pump systems. Using a mouse model of lethal infection, we demonstrated that whereas P2-15 and erythromycin were unable to protect mice when administered separately, concomitant administration of the compounds afforded long-lasting protection to one-third of the animals.
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Expression, purification and structural studies of a short antimicrobial peptide.
Biochim. Biophys. Acta
PUBLISHED: 04-07-2009
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We have produced a small antimicrobial peptide PFWRIRIRR in bacteria utilizing production in the form of insoluble fusion protein with ketosteroid isomerase. The recombinant peptide was rapidly and efficiently isolated by acidic cleavage of the fusion protein based on the acid labile Asp-Pro bond at the N-terminus of the peptide. The peptide has antibacterial activity and neutralizes macrophage activation by LPS. The selectivity of the peptide against bacteria correlates with preferential binding to acidic phospholipid vesicles. Solution structure of the peptide in SDS and DPC micelles was determined by NMR. The peptide adopts a well-defined structure, comprising a short helical segment. Cationic and hydrophobic clusters are segregated along the molecular axis of the short helix, which is positioned perpendicular to the membrane plane. The position of the helix is shifted in two micellar types and more nonpolar surface is exposed in anionic micelles. Overall structure explains the advantageous role of the N-terminal proline residue, which forms an integral part of the hydrophobic cluster.
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MARCKS as a negative regulator of lipopolysaccharide signaling.
J. Immunol.
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Myristoylated alanine-rich C kinase substrate (MARCKS) is an intrinsically unfolded protein with a conserved cationic effector domain, which mediates the cross-talk between several signal transduction pathways. Transcription of MARCKS is increased by stimulation with bacterial LPS. We determined that MARCKS and MARCKS-related protein specifically bind to LPS and that the addition of the MARCKS effector peptide inhibited LPS-induced production of TNF-? in mononuclear cells. The LPS binding site within the effector domain of MARCKS was narrowed down to a heptapeptide that binds to LPS in an extended conformation as determined by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. After LPS stimulation, MARCKS moved from the plasma membrane to FYVE-positive endosomes, where it colocalized with LPS. MARCKS-deficient mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) responded to LPS with increased IL-6 production compared with the matched wild-type MEFs. Similarly, small interfering RNA knockdown of MARCKS also increased LPS signaling, whereas overexpression of MARCKS inhibited LPS signaling. TLR4 signaling was enhanced by the ablation of MARCKS, which had no effect on stimulation by TLR2, TLR3, and TLR5 agonists. These findings demonstrate that MARCKS contributes to the negative regulation of the cellular response to LPS.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.