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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Issues patients would like to discuss at their review consultation in breast cancer clinics - a cross-sectional survey.
Tumori
PUBLISHED: 10-25-2014
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Aims and background. In breast cancer (BC) there are different therapies available with different side effects affecting the health-related quality of life (HRQOL) of patients. Here we report a novel tool, the BC-specific Patient Concerns Inventory (PCI). This work includes a survey that is part of the validation process to allow a larger cohort and comparisons with clinical characteristics. We report the concerns that BC patients would like to discuss in the outpatient clinic - using the PCI - and also their choice of multidisciplinary team members they would like to see. Methods and study design. We carried out a cross-sectional survey - using the BC-specific PCI, the EORTC QLQ-C30 and the EORTC BC QLQ-BR23 - of patients who had completed their initial treatment and were attending a review outpatient clinic. 249 patients were recruited from February to July 2012. Results. Survey responses were obtained from 80% (200/249). The three most frequent items were fear of cancer coming back (62%, 124), breast sensitivity/pain (46%, 92), and fatigue/tiredness and low energy levels overall (46%, 92). The most frequently selected members of the multidisciplinary team that patients wished to see were the breast care nurse (46%, 92), the medical oncologist (28%, 55) and the psychologist (20%, 40). Conclusions. The PCI provides the opportunity for multiprofessional engagement across a range of issues specific to BC. It can identify issues relating to physical, psychological, sexual and social functioning, as well as issues relating to body image and lifestyle.
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End of life care: The experiences of advance care planning amongst family caregivers of people with advanced dementia - A qualitative study.
Dementia (London)
PUBLISHED: 09-03-2014
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End of life decisions for people with advanced dementia are reported as often being difficult for families as they attempt to make appropriate and justified decisions.
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Inter-professional perspectives of dementia services and care in England: Outcomes of a focus group study.
Dementia (London)
PUBLISHED: 08-28-2014
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Many people living with dementia are supported at home using a variety of health and social care services. This paper reports the findings from a focus group study undertaken with staff in community mental health teams to explore areas for improvement in relation to national policies and recommendations for dementia care. Two focus groups were held with staff (n?=?23) in 2011 to discuss topics including service delivery, information and communication, and provision of health and community care for people with dementia. Respondents identified problems with information sharing and incompatible electronic systems; inflexibility in home care services; and poor recognition of dementia in hospital settings. General practitioners had developed a greater awareness of the disease and some community services worked well. They felt that budgetary constraints and a focus on quality indicators impeded good dementia care. Key areas suggested by staff for improvements in dementia care included the implementation of more flexible services, dementia training for health and social care staff, and better quality care in acute hospital settings.
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Coffee, Cake & Culture: Evaluation of an art for health programme for older people in the community.
Dementia (London)
PUBLISHED: 04-02-2014
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Arts for health initiatives and networks are being developed in a number of countries and an international literature is emerging on the evidence of their benefits to people's health, wellbeing and quality of life. Engagement in cultural and creative arts by older people can increase their morale and self-confidence and provides opportunities for social connection. Museums and galleries are increasingly required to justify their expenditure, reach and impact and some are working in partnership with local councils, hospitals, schools and communities to improve access to their collections. There is a body of literature emerging that describes such initiatives but empirical evidence of their benefits is less developed. This article reports an evaluation of an art for health initiative - Coffee, Cake & Culture organised and delivered by Whitworth Art Gallery and Manchester Museum in 2012 for older people living in a care home and a supported living facility. The study has identified the benefits and impacts of the arts for health programme and its feasibility for older people, with or without diagnosed memory loss - dementia, living in a care home or supported living facility and their care staff. The findings demonstrate there were benefits to the older people and their care staff in terms of wellbeing, social engagement, learning, social inclusion and creativity. These benefits were immediate and continued in the short term on their return home. The majority of older people and care staff had not previously been to the art gallery or museum and the programme encouraged creative arts and cultural appreciation which promoted social inclusion, wellbeing and quality of life. The programme is feasible and important lessons were identified for future planning. Further research involving partnerships of researchers, arts for health curators, artists, care staff, older people and their families is warranted.
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People with dementia and carers experiences of dementia care and services: Outcomes of a focus group study.
Dementia (London)
PUBLISHED: 12-31-2013
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An ageing population and an associated increase in the prevalence of dementia are of increasing concern in the United Kingdom and worldwide. Recently, the United Kingdom and other European countries implemented national dementia strategies to address this. This paper reports on the outcomes of a focus group study involving people with dementia and carers on their experiences of dementia care and support services in relation to government and third sector agencies objectives and recommendations. Three focus groups comprising carers and people with dementia (n?=?27) were undertaken covering topics related to experiences, service receipt, information sharing and service development. Some participants experienced difficulties or delays in receiving a dementia diagnosis and in accessing appropriate care. The provision of training, timeliness of information, access to appropriate advice, and consistent and flexible services were deemed important. The findings suggest that some issues raised by participants were highlighted in earlier policy objectives and recommendations but remain of central concern. The projected growth in the number of people with dementia coupled with reduced availability of informal care and increased demand for services emphasises the need to transform dementia care in the United Kingdom.
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Factors with the management of incontinence and promotion of continence in older people in care homes.
J Adv Nurs
PUBLISHED: 06-22-2013
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Review of intervention studies of associated factors with incontinence as the primary outcome in older people in care homes to identify and inform practice and future research.
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Systematic review of descriptive studies that investigated associated factors with the management of incontinence in older people in care homes.
Int J Older People Nurs
PUBLISHED: 12-19-2011
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Incontinence is prevalent among older populations and residents in care homes.
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Association between the Geriatric Giants of urinary incontinence and falls in older people using data from the Leicestershire MRC Incontinence Study.
Age Ageing
PUBLISHED: 09-24-2011
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To determine whether urinary incontinence per se and different types of urinary incontinence individually are associated with an increased risk of falls in those aged 70 years and over. To investigate whether the presence of urinary symptoms, poor quality of life and physical limitations in this population with urinary incontinence is associated with falls.
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Improving quality of life for older people in the community: findings from a local Partnerships for Older People Project innovation and evaluation.
Prim Health Care Res Dev
PUBLISHED: 07-30-2011
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Partnerships for Older People Projects (POPP) was a national initiative in England aimed at improving health, well-being and quality of life (QoL) for older people by developing local services. This development paper reports the key findings of a local evaluation in relation to quality of life, well-being and health-related QoL to provide practical understanding at the local level about what this means in relation to the schemes delivered.
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Care of patients with neurological conditions: the impact of a Generic Neurology Nursing Service development on patients and their carers.
J Clin Nurs
PUBLISHED: 05-12-2011
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The aim of this study was to explore patients and carers views and experiences of the impact of the Generic Neurology Nursing Service.
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Study protocol: ICONS: identifying continence options after stroke: a randomised trial.
Trials
PUBLISHED: 02-18-2011
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Urinary incontinence following acute stroke is common, affecting between 40%-60% of people in hospital after a stroke. Despite the availability of clinical guidelines for urinary incontinence and urinary incontinence after stroke, national audit data suggest incontinence is often poorly managed. Conservative interventions (e.g. bladder training, pelvic floor muscle training and prompted voiding) have been shown to have some effect with participants in Cochrane systematic reviews, but have not had their effectiveness demonstrated with stroke patients.
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Developing nursing practice, treatment and support services for ageing drug users.
Nurs Times
PUBLISHED: 12-25-2010
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Ageing drug users are a growing population who have problems accessing services and support.
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The role of antenatal pelvic floor muscle exercises in prevention of postpartum stress incontinence: a randomised controlled trial.
J Clin Nurs
PUBLISHED: 09-18-2010
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This article reports a randomised controlled trial to determine the efficacy of antenatal pelvic floor muscle exercises in the primary prevention of postpartum stress incontinence in primiparous women.
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Experiences of drug use and ageing: health, quality of life, relationship and service implications.
J Adv Nurs
PUBLISHED: 07-02-2010
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This paper is a report of an exploration of older peoples experiences of substance use in the context of ageing, and its impact on health, quality of life, relationships and service use.
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Older people and falls: health status, quality of life, lifestyle, care networks, prevention and views on service use following a recent fall.
J Clin Nurs
PUBLISHED: 07-09-2009
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This study has investigated older peoples experiences of a recent fall, its impact on their health, lifestyle, quality of life, care networks, prevention and their views on service use.
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Self reported health status, and health service contact, of illicit drug users aged 50 and over: a qualitative interview study in Merseyside, United Kingdom.
BMC Geriatr
PUBLISHED: 01-21-2009
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The populations of industrialised countries are ageing; as this occurs, those who continue to use alcohol and illicit drugs age also. While alcohol use among older people is well documented, use of illicit drugs continues to be perceived as behaviour of young people and is a neglected area of research. This is the first published qualitative research on the experiences of older drug users in the United Kingdom.
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Service developments for managing people with long-term conditions using case management approaches, an example from the UK.
Int J Integr Care
PUBLISHED: 01-21-2009
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This research has considered current developments in the provision of services for people with long-term conditions within the NHS of England. Community Matrons are being employed and by adopting a case management approach they are aiming to improve patient care and reduce their demands for acute hospital care.
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Patient-reported outcomes in breast oncology: a review of validated outcome instruments.
Tumori
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Patient-reported outcomes (PROs) include areas of health-related quality of life but also broader concepts such as patient satisfaction with care. The aim of this review is to give an account of all instruments with potential use in patients with a history of treatment for breast cancer (including surgery, chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy) with evidence of validation in the breast cancer population.
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An exploration of the perceived changes in intimacy of patients relationships following head and neck cancer.
J Clin Nurs
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This paper reports the experiences of former patients who have undergone a range of head and neck cancer treatments and their perceptions of the changes in intimacy experienced, as an individual and through their relationships with partners, family and friends.
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Systematic review of care intervention studies for the management of incontinence and promotion of continence in older people in care homes with urinary incontinence as the primary focus (1966-2010).
Geriatr Gerontol Int
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The aim of this paper was to compare published studies of care interventions for the management and promotion of continence, with urinary incontinence as the primary focus, in older care home residents. Incontinence is a prevalent and serious problem amongst older people in care homes, with an increasing international focus. MEDLINE and CINAHL searches via OVID (January 1966 to May 2010) were carried out, with studies limited to English language publications only. Included in this search were studies investigating urinary and fecal incontinence in people aged 65 years or older in care homes. Studies on surgical or pharmacological interventions or fecal incontinence alone were excluded. A total of 33 interventional studies were identified. Toileting programs and incontinence pads are the mainstays of treatment, with some studies implying significant economic and labor costs. Drug therapy as an adjunct to toileting programs has so far shown only moderate benefits. Combined physical therapy/behavioral therapies have shown effective short-term improvements. Adaptations to physical environment and staff training techniques might also be paramount. Exercise and Functional Incidental Training programs, although expensive, might provide additional benefit by reducing wetness rates and improving appropriate toileting rates. Combined complex behavioral interventions are now a common feature and their effectiveness for the management of urinary incontinence should be determined in future studies. Studies including long-term effectiveness on maintaining continence with full economic evaluation are also warranted in this population.
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Using care profiles to commission end-of-life services.
Prim Health Care Res Dev
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In early 2010, Liverpool Primary Care Trust (PCT) undertook a project to establish whether a care profiles methodology could be used to commission end-of-life (EoL) services. The Department of Health (DH) originally used them for a variety of services in the 1990s. The project sought to adapt the original care profiles structure for commissioning purposes, and produce a series of care profiles that would cover the full EoL care pathway.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.