JoVE Visualize What is visualize?
Stop Reading. Start Watching.
Advanced Search
Stop Reading. Start Watching.
Regular Search
Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Induction chemotherapy followed by concurrent chemoradiotherapy for advanced stage oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma with HPV and P16 testing.
Ann. Otol. Rhinol. Laryngol.
PUBLISHED: 03-31-2014
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
The objective was to report our experience with advanced stage oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma treated sequentially with induction chemotherapy followed by concurrent chemoradiotherapy.
Related JoVE Video
Mandibular osteotomy for expanded transoral robotic surgery: a novel technique.
Laryngoscope
PUBLISHED: 02-10-2014
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Transoral Robotic Surgery (TORS) has revolutionized the surgical treatment of malignant lesions of the oropharyngeal region. Recent studies have shown that this approach is a very safe procedure and can provide favorable clinical and functional outcomes with respect to traditional approaches. However, a small minority of patients who present with lesions amenable to TORS resection may not be candidates due to anatomical access issues. Anatomic features such as a retrognathic mandible, macroglossia, trismus, dentition, and small oral aperture limit the ability to perform TORS with current technology. We propose a modified TORS approach in which transoral mandibular osteotomies are performed that can greatly improve exposure to oropharyngeal subsites and expand access to the larynx in selected patients.
Related JoVE Video
A systematic review of transoral robotic surgery and radiotherapy for early oropharynx cancer: a systematic review.
Laryngoscope
PUBLISHED: 01-19-2014
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
To demonstrate the comparative effectiveness of transoral robotic surgery (TORS) to intensity modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for early T-stage oropharyngeal cancer.
Related JoVE Video
Related JoVE Video
Comparison of complication rates associated with stapling and traditional suture closure after total laryngectomy for advanced cancer.
Ear Nose Throat J
PUBLISHED: 08-27-2013
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
We conducted a retrospective, matched-cohort, case-control study to compare complication rates associated with two wound closure procedures-stapling vs. traditional hand suturing-following total laryngectomy. Our study population was made up of 42 consecutively presenting patients-38 men and 4 women, aged 34 to 92 years (mean: 60.3) whose pharyngotomies were amenable to primary closure. Of this group, 37 patients had active endolaryngeal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), 2 patients had inactive endolaryngeal SCC, 2 patients had thyroid cancer, and 1 patient had been treated for chronic aspiration. A total of 26 patients (61.9%) had undergone traditional suture closure of the neopharynx (suture group) and 16 patients (38.1%) had undergone closure with a linear stapling device (staple group). Other than the fact that the patients in the staple group were significantly older than those in the suture group (median: 71.0 vs. 56.5 yr, p = 0.002), there were no significant differences between the two groups in terms of comorbidities or cricopharyngeal myotomy, tracheoesophageal puncture, or neck dissection. There was a total of 8 postoperative infections-5 in the staple group (31.3%) and 3 in the suture group (11.5%)-not a statistically significant difference. Fistulas occurred in 4 staple patients (25.0%) and 6 suture patients (23.1%)-again, not statistically significant. We conclude that in appropriately selected patients, primary closure of the neopharynx can be safely and effectively achieved with a linear stapling device.
Related JoVE Video
Prevention and management of treatment-induced pharyngo-oesophageal stricture.
Lancet Oncol.
PUBLISHED: 07-31-2013
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Pharyngo-oesophageal stricture (PES) is a serious complication that occurs in up to a third of patients treated with external beam radiotherapy or combined chemoradiotherapy for head and neck cancer. This entity is under-reported and as a result, our understanding of the pathophysiology and prevention of this complication is restricted. This Review presents the knowledge so far on radiation-related and non-radiation-related risk factors for PES, including tumour stage and subsite, patient age, and comorbidities. The interventions to decrease this toxicity are discussed, including early detection of PES, initiation of an oral diet, and protection of swallowing structures from high-dose radiation. We discuss various treatment options, including swallowing exercises and manoeuvres, endoscopic dilatations, and for advanced cases, oesophageal reconstruction. Study of the subset of patients who develop this toxicity and early recognition and intervention of this pathological change in future trials will help to optimise treatment of these patients.
Related JoVE Video
Analysis of failure in patients with adenoid cystic carcinoma of the head and neck. An international collaborative study.
Head Neck
PUBLISHED: 04-09-2013
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC) is a locally aggressive tumor with a high prevalence of distant metastases. The purpose of this study was to identify independent predictors of outcome and to characterize the patterns of failure.
Related JoVE Video
Value of preoperative mandibular plating in reconstruction of the mandible.
Head Neck
PUBLISHED: 03-11-2013
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of preoperative versus intraoperative mandibular contouring using rapid prototyping technology.
Related JoVE Video
Transoral robotic surgery for the management of oropharyngeal minor salivary gland tumors.
Head Neck
PUBLISHED: 01-22-2013
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
In this study we report our preliminary experience with the use of transoral robotic surgery (TORS) for the management of minor salivary gland malignancies of the oropharynx and outcomes.
Related JoVE Video
Maxillary reconstruction with the scapular angle osteomyogenous free flap.
Arch. Otolaryngol. Head Neck Surg.
PUBLISHED: 11-23-2011
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
To report on experience with the scapular angle osteomyogenous flap for maxillary reconstruction.
Related JoVE Video
The expanding role of the anterolateral thigh free flap in head and neck reconstruction.
Curr Opin Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg
PUBLISHED: 09-09-2011
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
To review the recent literature on the expanding use of the anterolateral thigh free flap for head and neck reconstruction.
Related JoVE Video
Blood transfusion prediction in patients undergoing major head and neck surgery with free-flap reconstruction.
Arch. Otolaryngol. Head Neck Surg.
PUBLISHED: 12-22-2010
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
to develop a clinically useful perioperative blood transfusion prediction model for patients undergoing a major head and neck surgical procedure requiring free-flap reconstruction.
Related JoVE Video
Mandible reconstruction.
Curr Opin Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg
PUBLISHED: 05-21-2010
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
The purpose of this article is to review current microvascular mandibular reconstruction techniques and recent literature on the advances of tissue engineering as they relate to mandibular reconstruction.
Related JoVE Video
Laser-Doppler examination of the blood supply in pericranial flaps.
J. Oral Maxillofac. Surg.
PUBLISHED: 05-20-2010
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
The purpose of this investigation was to determine if there is evidence suggestive of blood flow within pericranial flaps.
Related JoVE Video
The role of free tissue transfer in merkel cell carcinoma of the head and neck.
J Skin Cancer
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is an uncommon neuroendocrine malignancy with a propensity for the head and neck. It typically presents asymptomatically in elderly Caucasians and is characterized by early local and regional spread. There is currently limited data on the appropriate algorithm for treatment of MCC. However, multimodal therapy with wide surgical excision with or without radiation therapy has become standard of care. The location of the primary tumor and intensive adjuvant therapy is often required, provides a challenge to the reconstructive head and neck surgeon. Occasionally, free tissue transfer reconstructive techniques are employed in the reconstruction of MCC defects. This paper will discuss the role of free tissue transfer as a reconstructive option after surgery for advanced head and neck MCC.
Related JoVE Video
Discrimination of benign and neoplastic mucosa with a high-resolution microendoscope (HRME) in head and neck cancer.
Ann. Surg. Oncol.
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
The efficacy of ablative surgery for head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) depends critically on obtaining negative margins. Although intraoperative "frozen section" analysis of margins is a valuable adjunct, it is expensive, time-consuming, and highly dependent on pathologist expertise. Optical imaging has potential to improve the accuracy of margins by identifying cancerous tissue in real time. Our goal was to determine the accuracy and inter-rater reliability of head and neck cancer specialists using high-resolution microendoscopic (HRME) images to discriminate between cancerous and benign mucosa.
Related JoVE Video
A reconstructive algorithm and classification system for transoral oropharyngeal defects.
Head Neck
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
BACKGROUND: Transoral techniques for oropharyngeal tumors, such as transoral robotic surgery (TORS) and transoral laser microsurgery (TLM), require new reconstructive considerations. METHODS: Defects from 92 patients undergoing TORS were classified into 4 classes. A reconstruction algorithm was followed. Perioperative outcomes and complications were assessed. Forty seven patients completed the MD Anderson Dysphagia Inventory (MDADI) swallowing questionnaire and a modified Velopharyngeal Insufficiency Quality of Life questionnaire (VPIQL) post-operatively. RESULTS: The most common reconstructions involved velopharyngoplasties with local flaps (39%), local flaps alone (25%), or secondary healing (20%). More advanced defects (Class III and IV defects) required regional and free flaps more often. No significant differences were found in MDADI scores or VPIQL scores among the four defect classes. Only adjuvant radiotherapy was a predictor of poor swallowing (p = 0.02). CONCLUSIONS: The classification system for transoral oropharyngeal defects maps defects into four classes and guides the reconstructive thought process. Head Neck, 2013.
Related JoVE Video
Preferences and utilities for health states following treatment for oropharyngeal cancer: Transoral robotic surgery versus definitive (chemo)radiotherapy.
Head Neck
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
BACKGROUND: Treatment of oropharyngeal cancer with Transoral Robotic Surgery (TORS) or definitive (chemo)radiotherapy impacts quality of life. Utility scores are needed for quality of life and economic comparisons. METHODS: Fifty healthy subjects and 9 experts reviewed scenarios describing treatment (TORS alone or with adjuvant radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy, definitive radiotherapy, and chemoradiotherapy), complications, remission, and recurrences. Utilities were assessed using visual analogue scales (VAS) and standard gamble (SG) techniques. Treatments were compared using paired comparisons. Demographic variability was assessed. RESULTS: TORS had higher SG utilities than radiotherapy (p = 0.001) and chemoradiotherapy (p < 0.001) and was preferred in paired comparisons (p < 0.001 for both) for healthy subjects. Utilities did not vary by demographic group and correlated between experts and subjects (VAS r = 0.95, p < 0.001; SG r = 0.97, p < 0.001). CONCLUSION: TORS has higher utility scores than chemoradiotherapy. Utilities can be used for cost-utility analyses. Head Neck, 2013.
Related JoVE Video

What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.