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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Allotransplantation for patients age ?40 years with non-Hodgkin lymphoma: encouraging progression-free survival.
Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
PUBLISHED: 01-30-2014
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Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) disproportionately affects older patients, who do not often undergo allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). We analyzed Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research data on 1248 patients age ?40 years receiving reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) or nonmyeloablative (NMA) conditioning HCT for aggressive (n = 668) or indolent (n = 580) NHL. Aggressive lymphoma was more frequent in the oldest cohort 49% for age 40 to 54 versus 57% for age 55 to 64 versus 67% for age ?65; P = .0008). Fewer patients aged ?65 had previous autografting (26% versus 24% versus 9%; P = .002). Rates of relapse, acute and chronic GVHD, and nonrelapse mortality (NRM) at 1 year post-HCT were similar in the 3 age cohorts (22% [95% confidence interval (CI), 19% to 26%] for age 40 to 54, 27% [95% CI, 23% to 31%] for age 55 to 64, and 34% [95% CI, 24% to 44%] for age ?65. Progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) at 3 years was slightly lower in the older cohorts (OS: 54% [95% CI, 50% to 58%] for age 40 to 54; 40% [95% CI, 36% to 44%] for age 55 to 64, and 39% [95% CI, 28% to 50%] for age ?65; P < .0001). Multivariate analysis revealed no significant effect of age on the incidence of acute or chronic GVHD or relapse. Age ?55 years, Karnofsky Performance Status <80, and HLA mismatch adversely affected NRM, PFS, and OS. Disease status at HCT, but not histological subtype, was associated with worse NRM, relapse, PFS, and OS. Even for patients age ?55 years, OS still approached 40% at 3 years, suggesting that HCT affects long-term remission and remains underused in qualified older patients with NHL.
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Lenalidomide maintenance for high-risk multiple myeloma after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation.
Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
PUBLISHED: 01-07-2014
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Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (alloHCT) with reduced-intensity conditioning is an appealing option for patients with high-risk multiple myeloma (MM). However, progression after alloHCT remains a challenge. Maintenance therapy after alloHCT may offer additional disease control and allow time for a graft-versus-myeloma effect. The primary objective of this clinical trial was to determine the tolerability and safety profile of maintenance lenalidomide (LEN) given on days 1 to 21 of 28 days cycles, with intrapatient dose escalation during 12 months/cycles after alloHCT. Thirty alloHCT recipients (median age, 54 years) with high-risk MM were enrolled at 8 centers between 2009 and 2012. The median time from alloHCT to LEN initiation was 96 days (range, 66 to 171 days). Eleven patients (37%) completed maintenance and 10 mg daily was the most commonly delivered dose (44%). Most common reasons for discontinuation were acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) (37%) and disease progression (37%). Cumulative incidence of grades III to IV acute GVHD from time of initiation of LEN was 17%. Outcomes at 18 months after initiation of maintenance were MM progression, 28%; transplantation-related mortality, 11%; and progression-free and overall survival, 63% and 78%, respectively. The use of LEN after alloHCT is feasible at lower doses, although it is associated with a 38% incidence of acute GVHD. Survival outcomes observed in this high-risk MM population warrant further study of this approach.
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Osteoporosis after stem cell transplantation.
Curr Osteoporos Rep
PUBLISHED: 11-09-2013
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With long-term survival for recipients of autologous and allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) increasing, the recognition of late complications such as decreased bone mineral density leading to osteoporosis (OP) has also increased. With an incidence that is reported to affect as many 50 % of allo HCT recipients, studies continue to mount supporting the need and success in treatment of this HCT complication. In this review, we highlight the major pathological mechanisms behind the development of OP, its diagnosis, and the literature supporting consensus treatment recommendations while noting areas of uncertainty that need further research.
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Reduced-intensity conditioning followed by related allografts in hematologic malignancies: long-term outcomes most successful in indolent and aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphomas.
Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
PUBLISHED: 09-03-2010
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Reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) extends the curative potential of allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) to patients with hematologic malignancies unable to withstand myeloablative conditioning. We prospectively analyzed the outcomes of 123 patients (median age, 57 years; range, 23-70 years) with hematologic malignancies treated with a uniform RIC regimen of cyclophosphamide, fludarabine, and total-body irradiation (200 cGy) with or without antithymocyte globulin followed by related donor allogeneic HCT at the University of Minnesota between 2002 and 2008. The cohort included 45 patients with acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) or myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), 27 with aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), 8 with indolent NHL, 10 with Hodgkin lymphoma (HL), 10 with myeloma, and 23 with acute lymphocytic leukemia, chronic myelogenous leukemia, other leukemias, or myeloproliferative disorders. The probability of 4-year overall survival was 73% for patients with indolent NHL, 58% for those with aggressive NHL, 67% for those with HL, 30% for those with AML/MDS, and only 10% for those with myeloma. Corresponding outcomes for relapse in these patients were 0%, 32%, 50%, 33%, and 38%, and those for progression-free survival were 73%, 45%, 27%, 27%, and 10%. The incidence of treatment-related mortality was 14% at day +100 and 22% at 1 year. The incidence of grade II-IV acute graft-versus-host disease was 38% at day +100, and that of chronic graft-versus-host disease was 50% at 2 years. Multivariate analysis revealed superior overall survival and progression-free survival in patients with both indolent and aggressive NHL compared with those with AML/MDS, HL, or myeloma. Worse 1-year treatment-related mortality was observed in patients with a Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation Comorbidity Index score ? 3 and in cytomegalovirus-seropositive recipients. These results suggest that (1) RIC conditioning was well tolerated by an older, heavily pretreated population; (2) patients with indolent and aggressive NHL respond well to RIC conditioning, highlighting the importance of the graft-versus-lymphoma effect; and (3) additional peri-transplantation manipulations are needed to improve outcomes for patients with AML/MDS or myeloma receiving RIC conditioning before HCT.
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Effect of age on outcome of reduced-intensity hematopoietic cell transplantation for older patients with acute myeloid leukemia in first complete remission or with myelodysplastic syndrome.
J. Clin. Oncol.
PUBLISHED: 03-08-2010
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PURPOSE Acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) primarily afflict older individuals. Hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is generally not offered because of concerns of excess morbidity and mortality. Reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) regimens allow increased use of allogeneic HCT for older patients. To define prognostic factors impacting long-term outcomes of RIC regimens in patients older than age 40 years with AML in first complete remission or MDS and to determine the impact of age, we analyzed data from the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research (CIBMTR). PATIENTS AND METHODS We reviewed data reported to the CIBMTR (1995 to 2005) on 1,080 patients undergoing RIC HCT. Outcomes analyzed included neutrophil recovery, incidence of acute or chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), nonrelapse mortality (NRM), relapse, disease-free survival (DFS), and overall survival (OS). RESULTS Univariate analyses demonstrated no age group differences in NRM, grade 2 to 4 acute GVHD, chronic GVHD, or relapse. Patients age 40 to 54, 55 to 59, 60 to 64, and > or = 65 years had 2-year survival rates as follows: 44% (95% CI, 37% to 52%), 50% (95% CI, 41% to 59%), 34% (95% CI, 25% to 43%), and 36% (95% CI, 24% to 49%), respectively, for patients with AML (P = .06); and 42% (95% CI, 35% to 49%), 35% (95% CI, 27% to 43%), 45% (95% CI, 36% to 54%), and 38% (95% CI, 25% to 51%), respectively, for patients with MDS (P = .37). Multivariate analysis revealed no significant impact of age on NRM, relapse, DFS, or OS (all P > .3). Greater HLA disparity adversely affected 2-year NRM, DFS, and OS. Unfavorable cytogenetics adversely impacted relapse, DFS, and OS. Better pre-HCT performance status predicted improved 2-year OS. CONCLUSION With these similar outcomes observed in older patients, we conclude that older age alone should not be considered a contraindication to HCT.
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Reduced-intensity conditioning allogeneic stem cell transplantation for older adults: is it the standard of care?
Curr. Opin. Hematol.
PUBLISHED: 01-15-2010
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We reviewed reduced-intensity hematopoietic cell transplantation for older patients in the context of recently published studies.
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Promising progression-free survival for patients low and intermediate grade lymphoid malignancies after nonmyeloablative umbilical cord blood transplantation.
Biol. Blood Marrow Transplant.
PUBLISHED: 01-27-2009
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Nonmyeloablative hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) has been used to treat patients with advanced or high-risk lymphoid malignancies. We studied 65 patients (median age 46 years) receiving an umbilical cord blood (UCB) graft after a single conditioning regimen consisting of cyclophosphamide (50 mg/kg) on day -6, fludarabine (40 mg/m(2)) daily on days -6 to -2, as well as a single fraction of total-body irradiation (TBI) (200 cGy) along with cyclosporine mycophenolate mofetil immunosuppression. Median time to neutrophil and platelet recovery was 7.5 days (range: 0-32) and 46 days (range: 8-111), respectively. Cumulative incidences of grade II-IV, grade III-IV acute, and chronic graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD, cGVHD) were 57% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 43%-70%), 25% (95% CI: 14%-35%), and 19% (95% CI: 9%-29%), respectively. Transplant-related mortality at 3 years was 15% (95% CI: 5%-26%). Median follow-up was 23 months. The progression free-survival (PFS), current PFS and overall survival (OS) were 34% (95% CI: 21%-47%), 49% (95% CI: 36%-62%), and 55% (95% CI: 42%-70%) at 3 years. Based on our data, we conclude that a nonmyeloablative conditioning regimen followed by UCB transplantation is an effective treatment for patients with advanced lymphoid malignancies who lack a suitable sibling donor.
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Bone loss and avascular necrosis of bone after hematopoietic cell transplantation.
Semin. Hematol.
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Advances in transplantation technology and supportive care measures have resulted in significant decrease in early mortality resulting in continued growth in the number of long-term hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) survivors. The intensity of chemotherapy and total body irradiation regimen used pretransplantation to eradicate the primary disease can lead to organ toxicities, including significant bone complications after HCT. Bone loss is frequent in HCT recipients and results from impaired bone mineralization through disturbances of calcium and vitamin D homeostasis, osteoblast and osteoclast dysfunction, and deficiencies in growth or gonadal hormone secretion. Exposure to glucocorticoids and calcineurin inhibitors for prevention and treatment of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) represents one of the major causes for the increased risk of osteoporosis and avascular necrosis of bone (AVN) in recipients of allogeneic HCT. In this article we review the incidence, pathogenesis, and risk factors for osteoporosis and AVN after allogeneic HCT and discuss general guidelines for their treatment and monitoring based on the limited available reports.
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In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.