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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
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Characterization of a murine model of SMA.
Neurobiol. Dis.
PUBLISHED: 10-14-2011
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Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an autosomal recessive neuromuscular disease, which is the leading genetic cause of mortality in children. To date no effective treatment exists for SMA. The genetic basis for SMA has been well documented as a mutation in the gene for survival of motor neuron (SMN). Because there is an understanding of which gene needs to be replaced (SMN) and where it needs to be replaced (spinal motor systems), SMA is an ideal target for gene replacement via gene therapy. While a variety of animal models for SMA exist, they are either too fulminant to realistically test most gene delivery strategies, or too mild to provide a robust read out of the therapeutic effect. The field, therefore, requires a robust model with a slower symptomatic progression. A conditional knockout of SMN in neuronal cell types, giving a phenotype of functional motor defects, weight loss and reduced life expectancy partially satisfies this need (Frugier, Tiziano et al. 2000). This Cre/LoxP mediated neuron specific model presents an attractive alternative. In the present manuscript, we characterize the functional motor deficits of the model. We observed a decline in locomotor ability, as assessed by open field testing. The finer functions of motor skills such as righting reflex and grip strength were also observed to degenerate in the SMA mice. The decline in motor function that we observed here correlates with the anatomical decline in motor neurons and motor axons presented in the literature (Ferri, Melki et al. 2004). This work adds to our understanding and knowledge base of this Cre/LoxP model and provides a basis from which functional recovery, following interventions can be assessed.
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Intramuscular administration of a VEGF zinc finger transcription factor activator (VEGF-ZFP-TF) improves functional outcomes in SOD1 rats.
Amyotroph Lateral Scler
PUBLISHED: 08-24-2011
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Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is characterized by motor neuron loss leading to paralysis and death. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) has angiogenic, neurotrophic, and neuroprotective properties, and has preserved neuromuscular function and protected motor neurons in rats engineered to overexpress the human gene coding the mutated G93A form of the superoxide dismutase-1 (SOD1). We assessed the effects of intramuscular administration of a plasmid that encodes a zinc finger protein transcription factor (ZFP-TF) engineered to induce VEGF expression in the SOD1 rat model of ALS. Weekly injections of the plasmid preserved ipsilateral hindlimb grip strength and markedly improved rotarod performance in SOD1 rats compared to the vehicle-treated group. The number of motor neurons and the proportion of innervated neuromuscular junctions were similar in both groups. In conclusion, our data suggest that administration of the VEGF-ZFP-TF may be neuroprotective and has potential as a safe and practical approach for the management of motor disability in ALS.
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Comparison of adeno-associated viral vector serotypes for spinal cord and motor neuron gene delivery.
Hum. Gene Ther.
PUBLISHED: 07-25-2011
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Gene therapy for motor neuron diseases requires efficient gene delivery to motor neurons (MNs) throughout the spinal cord and brainstem. The present study compared adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector serotypes 1, 6, 8, and 9 for spinal cord delivery in adult mice, by the intraparenchymal or intrathecal route of administration. Whereas intraparenchymal injections resulted in local transduction of the lumbar segment of the spinal cord, intrathecal injections led to a broader distribution, transducing cells along the sacral, lumbar, and lower thoracic spinal cord. Overall, AAV6 and AAV9 performed better than the other serotypes. Dramatic differences in cell-specific expression patterns could be observed when constructs bearing the chicken ?-actin (Cba) versus cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter were compared. In summary, intrathecal delivery of AAV6 or AAV9 vectors containing the CMV promoter yielded the strongest levels of biodistribution and MN transduction in the spinal cord.
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Characterization of dental pulp stem/stromal cells of Huntington monkey tooth germs.
BMC Cell Biol.
PUBLISHED: 06-10-2011
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Dental pulp stem/stromal cells (DPSCs) are categorized as adult stem cells (ASCs) that retain multipotent differentiation capabilities. DPSCs can be isolated from individuals at any age and are considered to be true personal stem cells, making DPSCs one of the potential options for stem cell therapy. However, the properties of DPSCs from individuals with an inherited genetic disorder, such as Huntingtons disease (HD), have not been fully investigated.
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Assessment of hippocampal adeno-associated viral vector gene delivery via frameless stereotaxis in a nonhuman primate.
Stereotact Funct Neurosurg
PUBLISHED: 04-07-2011
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Expression of the neuropeptide galanin in hippocampal neurons reduces seizures in the kainic acid rodent model of epilepsy. In order to translate these findings into a human clinical trial, the safety and feasibility of hippocampal adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector expression must be demonstrated in a nonhuman primate model.
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Viral vector-mediated gene transfer for CNS disease.
Expert Opin Biol Ther
PUBLISHED: 02-06-2010
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Gene therapy is a promising strategy for the treatment of many neurological disorders that currently lack effective treatment. Recent improvements in vectorology and vector engineering have improved overall safety and delivery of viral vectors.
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Monkey hybrid stem cells develop cellular features of Huntingtons disease.
BMC Cell Biol.
PUBLISHED: 02-05-2010
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Pluripotent stem cells that are capable of differentiating into different cell types and develop robust hallmark cellular features are useful tools for clarifying the impact of developmental events on neurodegenerative diseases such as Huntingtons disease. Additionally, a Huntingtons cell model that develops robust pathological features of Huntingtons disease would be valuable for drug discovery research.
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Human multipotent stromal cells (MSCs) increase neurogenesis and decrease atrophy of the striatum in a transgenic mouse model for Huntingtons disease.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 02-02-2010
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Implantation of human multipotent stromal cells from bone marrow (hMSCs) into the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus of mice was previously shown to stimulate proliferation, migration and neural differentiation of endogenous neural stem cells. We hypothesized that hMSCs would be beneficial in a mouse model of Huntington disease (HD) due to these neurogenic effects.
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A conditioning lesion provides selective protection in a rat model of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 05-07-2009
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Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) is neurodegenerative disease characterized by muscle weakness and atrophy due to progressive motoneuron loss. The death of motoneuron is preceded by the failure of neuromuscular junctions (NMJs) and axonal retraction. Thus, to develop an effective ALS therapy you must simultaneously preserve motoneuron somas, motor axons and NMJs. A conditioning lesion has the potential to accomplish this since it has been shown to enhance neuronal survival and recovery from trauma in a variety of contexts.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.