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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Do eating behaviors in the general population account for country variance in glycemic control among adolescents with diabetes: the Hvidoere Study Group and the Health Behaviour in School-Aged Children study.
Pediatr Diabetes
PUBLISHED: 03-14-2013
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The Hvidoere Study Group (HSG) has demonstrated major differences in glycemic control between pediatric diabetes centers which remain largely unexplained. This study investigates whether these differences are partly attributable to healthy eating norms in the background population.
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Invasive fungal infection and impaired neutrophil killing in human CARD9 deficiency.
Blood
PUBLISHED: 01-18-2013
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Caspase recruitment domain-containing protein 9 (CARD9) is an adaptor molecule in the cytosol of myeloid cells, required for induction of T-helper cells producing interleukin-17 (Th17 cells) and important in antifungal immunity. In a patient suffering from Candida dubliniensis meningoencephalitis, mutations in the CARD9 gene were found to result in the loss of protein expression. Apart from the reduced numbers of CD4(+) Th17 lymphocytes, we identified a lack of monocyte-derived cytokines in response to Candida strains. Importantly, CARD9-deficient neutrophils showed a selective Candida albicans killing defect with abnormal ultrastructural phagolysosomes and outgrowth of hyphae. The neutrophil killing defect was independent of the generation of reactive oxygen species by the reduced NAD phosphate oxidase system. Taken together, this demonstrates that human CARD9 deficiency results in selective defect in the host defense against invasive fungal infection, caused by an impaired phagocyte killing.
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Proinsulin, GLP-1, and glucagon are associated with partial remission in children and adolescents with newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes.
Pediatr Diabetes
PUBLISHED: 11-27-2011
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Proinsulin is a marker of beta-cell distress and dysfunction in type 2 diabetes and transplanted islets. Proinsulin levels are elevated in patients newly diagnosed with type 1 diabetes. Our aim was to assess the relationship between proinsulin, insulin dose-adjusted haemoglobin A1c (IDAA1C), glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), glucagon, and remission status the first year after diagnosis of type 1 diabetes.
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Relationship between ZnT8Ab, the SLC30A8 gene and disease progression in children with newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes.
Autoimmunity
PUBLISHED: 05-23-2011
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Autoantibodies against the newly established autoantigen in type 1 diabetes, zinc transporter 8, ZnT8, are presented as two types, ZnT8RAb and ZnT8WAb. The rs13266634 variant of the SLC30A8 gene has recently been found to determine the type of ZnT8Ab. The aim of this study was to explore the impact of this genetic variant and the ZnT8Ab on the residual beta-cell function during disease progression the first year after disease diagnosis in children with newly diagnosed type 1 diabetes. This cohort consists of 257 children aged < 16 years, all patients were newly diagnosed with type 1 diabetes. A Boost-test was carried out at 1, 6, and 12 months to characterize the residual beta-cell function. Carriers of the CC and CT genotype groups of the rs13266634 SNP of the SLC30A8 gene had higher stimulated C-peptide levels the first year after onset compared with those of the TT genotype group (29%, p = 0.034). CC genotype carriers were highly associated with the presence of ZnT8RAb subtype during disease progression (compared with TT, p < 0.0001). On the other hand, the TT genotype was associated with the presence of ZnT8WAb subtype during disease progression (compared with CC, p < 0.0001). The C allele of the SLC30A8 gene is associated with preserved beta-cell function in type 1 diabetes patients. The genetic determination of the rs13266634 variant on the ZnT8Ab specificity is sustained the first 12 months after the diagnosis of type 1 diabetes in a pediatric cohort.
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Insulin delivery by injection in children and adolescents with diabetes.
Pediatr Diabetes
PUBLISHED: 04-11-2011
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Type 1 diabetes is treated with insulin, which has traditionally been delivered by vial and syringe. However, for many patients, dosing inaccuracy, pain, anxiety, inconvenience, and social acceptability present barriers to this method of administration (1-5). This has contributed to the increased popularity of alternative insulin delivery systems, including pen delivery devices (4, 6). Evidence suggests that discreet devices, such as insulin pens, facilitate adherence to intensive insulin therapy regimens, help improve lifestyle flexibility, and reduce injection pain compared with the conventional syringe-based regimens, as shown in studies in adults and adolescents (7). In addition, compared with the vial and syringe method of insulin administration, pens may provide more accurate dosing - which is particularly important in children - thereby improving short-term blood glucose control and potentially improving long-term outcomes (5, 8). Children, in particular, may benefit from insulin pens that are simple to use as adherence issues may be more evident in this patient group (9). Pens for insulin delivery in children with type 1 diabetes have been used for a long time in Europe, and have recently gained in popularity in many other places around the world (4, 10). Furthermore, the conventional vial and syringe method of insulin delivery is beginning to be considered as obsolete (11). Moreover, there is a continued drive to improve insulin pen technology, to refine and enhance the functionality and usability of these pens. However, despite recent advances in pen design and function, the selection of pens available especially for children is limited.
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Birth order and childhood type 1 diabetes risk: a pooled analysis of 31 observational studies.
Int J Epidemiol
PUBLISHED: 12-10-2010
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The incidence rates of childhood onset type 1 diabetes are almost universally increasing across the globe but the aetiology of the disease remains largely unknown. We investigated whether birth order is associated with the risk of childhood diabetes by performing a pooled analysis of previous studies.
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Disease progression and search for monogenic diabetes among children with new onset type 1 diabetes negative for ICA, GAD- and IA-2 Antibodies.
BMC Endocr Disord
PUBLISHED: 09-23-2010
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To investigate disease progression the first 12 months after diagnosis in children with type 1 diabetes negative (AAB negative) for pancreatic autoantibodies [islet cell autoantibodies(ICA), glutamic acid decarboxylase antibodies (GADA) and insulinoma-associated antigen-2 antibodies (IA-2A)]. Furthermore the study aimed at determining whether mutations in KCNJ11, ABCC8, HNF1A, HNF4A or INS are common in AAB negative diabetes.
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Transition from pediatric to adult diabetes care: smooth or slippery?
Pediatr Diabetes
PUBLISHED: 12-14-2009
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The purpose of this study is to evaluate the practices of diabetes health care providers concerning the transition from pediatric to adult diabetes care. The information presented here may help increase awareness of the organization of transitional care for young people with diabetes and prevent the loss of follow-up during this vulnerable period in their lives.
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New definition for the partial remission period in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes.
Diabetes Care
PUBLISHED: 05-12-2009
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OBJECTIVE To find a simple definition of partial remission in type 1 diabetes that reflects both residual beta-cell function and efficacy of insulin treatment. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS A total of 275 patients aged <16 years were followed from onset of type 1 diabetes. After 1, 6, and 12 months, stimulated C-peptide during a challenge was used as a measure of residual beta-cell function. RESULTS By multiple regression analysis, a negative association between stimulated C-peptide and A1C (regression coefficient -0.21, P < 0.001) and insulin dose (-0.94, P < 0.001) was shown. These results suggested the definition of an insulin dose-adjusted A1C (IDAA1C) as A1C (percent) + [4 x insulin dose (units per kilogram per 24 h)]. A calculated IDAA1C < or =9 corresponding to a predicted stimulated C-peptide >300 pmol/l was used to define partial remission. The IDAA1C < or =9 had a significantly higher agreement (P < 0.001) with residual beta-cell function than use of a definition of A1C < or =7.5%. Between 6 and 12 months after diagnosis, for IDAA1C < or =9 only 1 patient entered partial remission and 61 patients ended partial remission, for A1C < or =7.5% 15 patients entered partial remission and 53 ended, for a definition of insulin dose < or =0.5 units . kg(-1) . 24 h(-1) 5 patients entered partial remission and 66 ended, and for stimulated C-peptide (>300 pmol/l) 9 patients entered partial remission and 49 ended. IDAA1C at 6 months has good predictive power for stimulated C-peptide concentrations after both 6 and 12 months. CONCLUSIONS A new definition of partial remission is proposed, including both glycemic control and insulin dose. It reflects residual beta-cell function and has better stability compared with the conventional definitions.
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Technical solution for data collection, data safety and data privacy legislation: experiences from the SWEET study.
Pediatr Diabetes
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One of the most important tasks of the SWEET study is benchmarking the data collected. Information on the occurrence of the disease of diabetes, the treatment, and their outcomes in children from the different member states of European Union (EU) is crucial. How the collection of data is realized is essential, concerning both the technical issues and the results. The creation of SWEET Centers of Reference (CoR), all over Europe will be facilitated by the access to safe data collection, where legal aspects and privacy are ascertained.
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Harmonize care to optimize outcome in children and adolescents with diabetes mellitus: treatment recommendations in Europe.
Pediatr Diabetes
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Identify and evaluate current treatment recommendations in Europe for the care of children with diabetes in view of the European Union (EU) recommendations for Reference Centers.
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Heterogeneity in the systems of pediatric diabetes care across the European Union.
Pediatr Diabetes
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It is known that the systems of pediatric diabetes care differ across the member states of the European Union (EU). The aim of this project was to characterize some of the main differences among the national systems.
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Cross-border flow of health information: is privacy by design enough? Privacy performance assessment in EUBIROD.
Eur J Public Health
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The EUBIROD project aims to perform a cross-border flow of diabetes information across 19 European countries using the BIRO information system, which embeds privacy principles and data protection mechanisms in its architecture (privacy by design). A specific task of EUBIROD was to investigate the variability in the implementation of the EU Data Protection Directive (DPD) across participating centres.
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Interbirth interval is associated with childhood type 1 diabetes risk.
Diabetes
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Short interbirth interval has been associated with maternal complications and childhood autism and leukemia, possibly due to deficiencies in maternal micronutrients at conception or increased exposure to sibling infections. A possible association between interbirth interval and subsequent risk of childhood type 1 diabetes has not been investigated. A secondary analysis of 14 published observational studies of perinatal risk factors for type 1 diabetes was conducted. Risk estimates of diabetes by category of interbirth interval were calculated for each study. Random effects models were used to calculate pooled odds ratios (ORs) and investigate heterogeneity between studies. Overall, 2,787 children with type 1 diabetes were included. There was a reduction in the risk of childhood type 1 diabetes in children born to mothers after interbirth intervals <3 years compared with longer interbirth intervals (OR 0.82 [95% CI 0.72-0.93]). Adjustments for various potential confounders little altered this estimate. In conclusion, there was evidence of a 20% reduction in the risk of childhood diabetes in children born to mothers after interbirth intervals <3 years.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

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In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.