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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Infection After Intracerebral Hemorrhage: Risk Factors and Association With Outcomes in the Ethnic/Racial Variations of Intracerebral Hemorrhage Study.
Stroke
PUBLISHED: 10-16-2014
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Risk factors for infections after intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) and their association with outcomes are unknown. We hypothesized there are predictors of poststroke infection and infections drive worse outcomes.
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Lack of Association of the APOL1 G3 Haplotype in African Americans with ESRD.
J. Am. Soc. Nephrol.
PUBLISHED: 09-25-2014
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Apolipoprotein L1 gene (APOL1) G1 and G2 variants are strongly associated with progressive nondiabetic nephropathy in populations with recent African ancestry. Selection for these variants occurred as a result of protection from human African trypanosomiasis (HAT). Resequencing of this region in 10 genetically and geographically distinct African populations residing in HAT endemic regions identified eight single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in strong linkage disequilibrium and comprising a novel G3 haplotype. To determine whether the APOL1 G3 haplotype was associated with nephropathy, G1, G2, and G3 SNPs and 70 ancestry informative markers spanning the genome were genotyped in 937 African Americans with nondiabetic ESRD, 965 African Americans with type 2 diabetes-associated ESRD, and 1029 non-nephropathy controls. In analyses adjusting for age, sex, APOL1 G1/G2 risk (recessive), and global African ancestry, the G3 haplotype was not significantly associated with ESRD (P=0.05 for nondiabetic ESRD, P=0.57 for diabetes-associated ESRD, and P=0.27 for all-cause ESRD). We conclude that variation in APOL1 G3 makes a nominal, if any, contribution to ESRD in African Americans; G1 and G2 variants explain the vast majority of nondiabetic nephropathy susceptibility.
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The IRF5-TNPO3 association with systemic lupus erythematosus has two components that other autoimmune disorders variably share.
Hum. Mol. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 09-08-2014
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Exploiting genotyping, DNA sequencing, imputation and trans-ancestral mapping, we used Bayesian and frequentist approaches to model the IRF5-TNPO3 locus association, now implicated in two immunotherapies and seven autoimmune diseases. Specifically, in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), we resolved separate associations in the IRF5 promoter (all ancestries) and with an extended European haplotype. We captured 3230 IRF5-TNPO3 high-quality, common variants across 5 ethnicities in 8395 SLE cases and 7367 controls. The genetic effect from the IRF5 promoter can be explained by any one of four variants in 5.7 kb (P-valuemeta = 6 × 10(-49); OR = 1.38-1.97). The second genetic effect spanned an 85.5-kb, 24-variant haplotype that included the genes IRF5 and TNPO3 (P-valuesEU = 10(-27)-10(-32), OR = 1.7-1.81). Many variants at the IRF5 locus with previously assigned biological function are not members of either final credible set of potential causal variants identified herein. In addition to the known biologically functional variants, we demonstrated that the risk allele of rs4728142, a variant in the promoter among the lowest frequentist probability and highest Bayesian posterior probability, was correlated with IRF5 expression and differentially binds the transcription factor ZBTB3. Our analytical strategy provides a novel framework for future studies aimed at dissecting etiological genetic effects. Finally, both SLE elements of the statistical model appear to operate in Sjögren's syndrome and systemic sclerosis whereas only the IRF5-TNPO3 gene-spanning haplotype is associated with primary biliary cirrhosis, demonstrating the nuance of similarity and difference in autoimmune disease risk mechanisms at IRF5-TNPO3.
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Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies in African Americans provides insights into the genetic architecture of type 2 diabetes.
PLoS Genet.
PUBLISHED: 08-01-2014
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Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is more prevalent in African Americans than in Europeans. However, little is known about the genetic risk in African Americans despite the recent identification of more than 70 T2D loci primarily by genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in individuals of European ancestry. In order to investigate the genetic architecture of T2D in African Americans, the MEta-analysis of type 2 DIabetes in African Americans (MEDIA) Consortium examined 17 GWAS on T2D comprising 8,284 cases and 15,543 controls in African Americans in stage 1 analysis. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) association analysis was conducted in each study under the additive model after adjustment for age, sex, study site, and principal components. Meta-analysis of approximately 2.6 million genotyped and imputed SNPs in all studies was conducted using an inverse variance-weighted fixed effect model. Replications were performed to follow up 21 loci in up to 6,061 cases and 5,483 controls in African Americans, and 8,130 cases and 38,987 controls of European ancestry. We identified three known loci (TCF7L2, HMGA2 and KCNQ1) and two novel loci (HLA-B and INS-IGF2) at genome-wide significance (4.15 × 10(-94)
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The ras responsive transcription factor RREB1 is a novel candidate gene for type 2 diabetes associated end-stage kidney disease.
Hum. Mol. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 07-15-2014
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Familial clustering and presumed genetic risk for type 2 diabetic (T2D) and non-diabetic end-stage kidney disease (ESKD) appear strong in African Americans. Examination of exome sequencing data in African American T2D-ESKD cases and non-diabetic non-nephropathy controls identified two low-frequency variants in the RREB1 gene, a repressor of the angiotensinogen (AGT) gene previously associated with kidney function, as being associated with T2D-ESKD: rs9379084 (P = 0.00087, OR = 0.26; D1171N) and rs41302867 (P = 0.00078, OR = 0.21; splice site variant). Rs41302867 replicated association in an independent sample of African Americans with T2D-ESKD [rs41302867 P = 0.033 (OR = 0.50)], and a trend towards rs9379084 association was observed (P = 0.070). In European Americans with T2D-ESKD compared with European American population based controls, both RREB1 variants replicated association [rs9379084 P = 1.67 × 10(-4) (OR = 0.54) and rs41302867 P = 0.013 (OR = 0.69)]. Rs9379084 was not associated with non-T2D-ESKD or T2D in African Americans (P = 0.55 and P = 0.37, respectively), but was associated with T2D in European Americans (P = 0.014, OR = 0.65). In African Americans, rs41302867 was associated with non-T2D-ESKD [P = 0.036 (OR = 0.54)] and hypertension attributed ESKD [H-ESKD, P = 0.029 (OR = 0.50)]. A meta-analysis combining African American and European American T2D-ESKD data revealed P = 3.52 × 10(-7) and 3.70 × 10(-5) for rs9379084 and rs41302867 association, respectfully. A locus-wide analysis evaluating putatively functional SNPs revealed several nominal associations with T2D-ESKD, non-T2D-ESKD and T2D in African and European Americans. RREB1 is a large, complex gene which codes a multidomain zinc finger binding protein and transcription factor. We posit that variants in RREB1 modulate seemingly disparate phenotypes (i.e. T2D, T2D-ESKD and non-T2D-ESKD) through altered activity resulting from splice site and missense variants.
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Coding variants in nephrin (NPHS1) and susceptibility to nephropathy in African Americans.
Clin J Am Soc Nephrol
PUBLISHED: 06-19-2014
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Presumed genetic risk for diabetic and nondiabetic end stage renal disease is strong in African Americans.
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Lupus Nephritis Susceptibility Loci in Women with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus.
J. Am. Soc. Nephrol.
PUBLISHED: 06-12-2014
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Lupus nephritis is a manifestation of SLE resulting from glomerular immune complex deposition and inflammation. Lupus nephritis demonstrates familial aggregation and accounts for significant morbidity and mortality. We completed a meta-analysis of three genome-wide association studies of SLE to identify lupus nephritis-predisposing loci. Through genotyping and imputation, >1.6 million markers were assessed in 2000 unrelated women of European descent with SLE (588 patients with lupus nephritis and 1412 patients with lupus without nephritis). Tests of association were computed using logistic regression adjusting for population substructure. The strongest evidence for association was observed outside the MHC and included markers localized to 4q11-q13 (PDGFRA, GSX2; P=4.5×10(-7)), 16p12 (SLC5A11; P=5.1×10(-7)), 6p22 (ID4; P=7.4×10(-7)), and 8q24.12 (HAS2, SNTB1; P=1.1×10(-6)). Both HLA-DR2 and HLA-DR3, two well established lupus susceptibility loci, showed evidence of association with lupus nephritis (P=0.06 and P=3.7×10(-5), respectively). Within the class I region, rs9263871 (C6orf15-HCG22) had the strongest evidence of association with lupus nephritis independent of HLA-DR2 and HLA-DR3 (P=8.5×10(-6)). Consistent with a functional role in lupus nephritis, intra-renal mRNA levels of PDGFRA and associated pathway members showed significant enrichment in patients with lupus nephritis (n=32) compared with controls (n=15). Results from this large-scale genome-wide investigation of lupus nephritis provide evidence of multiple biologically relevant lupus nephritis susceptibility loci.
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A comparison of type 2 diabetes risk allele load between African Americans and European Americans.
Hum. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 04-10-2014
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The prevalence of type 2 diabetes (T2D) is greater in populations of African descent compared to European-descent populations. Genetic risk factors may underlie the disparity in disease prevalence. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified >60 common genetic variants that contribute to T2D risk in populations of European, Asian, African and Hispanic descent. These studies have not comprehensively examined population differences in cumulative risk allele load. To investigate the relationship between risk allele load and T2D risk, 46 T2D single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 43 loci from GWAS in European, Asian, and African-derived populations were genotyped in 1,990 African Americans (n = 963 T2D cases, n = 1,027 controls) and 1,644 European Americans (n = 719 T2D cases, n = 925 controls) ascertained and recruited using a common protocol in the southeast United States. A genetic risk score (GRS) was constructed from the cumulative risk alleles for each individual. In African American subjects, risk allele frequencies ranged from 0.024 to 0.964. Risk alleles from 26 SNPs demonstrated directional consistency with previous studies, and 3 SNPs from ADAMTS9, TCF7L2, and ZFAND6 showed nominal evidence of association (p < 0.05). African American individuals carried 38-67 (53.7 ± 4.0, mean ± SD) risk alleles. In European American subjects, risk allele frequencies ranged from 0.084 to 0.996. Risk alleles from 36 SNPs demonstrated directional consistency, and 10 SNPs from BCL11A, PSMD6, ADAMTS9, ZFAND3, ANK1, CDKN2A/B, TCF7L2, PRC1, FTO, and BCAR1 showed evidence of association (p < 0.05). European American individuals carried 38-65 (50.9 ± 4.4) risk alleles. African Americans have a significantly greater burden of 2.8 risk alleles (p = 3.97 × 10(-89)) compared to European Americans. However, GRS modeling showed that cumulative risk allele load was associated with risk of T2D in European Americans, but only marginally in African Americans. This result suggests that there are ethnic-specific differences in genetic architecture underlying T2D, and that these differences complicate our understanding of how risk allele load impacts disease susceptibility.
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APOL1 associations with nephropathy, atherosclerosis, and all-cause mortality in African Americans with type 2 diabetes.
Kidney Int.
PUBLISHED: 03-17-2014
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Albuminuria and reduced estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) associate with two apolipoprotein L1 gene (APOL1) variants in nondiabetic African Americans (AAs). Whether APOL1 associates with subclinical atherosclerosis and survival remains unclear. To determine this, 717 African American-Diabetes Heart Study participants underwent computed tomography to determine coronary artery-, carotid artery-, and aorta-calcified atherosclerotic plaque mass scores in addition to the urine albumin:creatinine ratio (UACR), eGFR, and C-reactive protein (CRP). Associations between mass scores and APOL1 were assessed adjusting for age, gender, African ancestry, body mass index (BMI), hemoglobin A1c, smoking, hypertension, use of statins and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, albuminuria, and eGFR. Participants were 58.9% female with mean age 56.5 years, eGFR 89.5?ml/min per 1.73?m(2), UACR 169.6?mg/g, and coronary artery-, carotid artery-, and aorta-calcified plaque mass scores of 610, 171, and 5378, respectively. In fully adjusted models, APOL1 risk variants were significantly associated with lower levels of carotid artery-calcified plaque (?=-0.42, s.e. 0.18; dominant model) and marginally lower coronary artery plaque (?=-0.36, s.e. 0.21; dominant model), but not with aorta-calcified plaque, CRP, UACR, or eGFR. By the end of a mean follow-up of 5.0 years, 89 participants had died. APOL1 nephropathy risk variants were significantly associated with improved survival (hazard ratio 0.67 for one copy; 0.44 for two copies). Thus, APOL1 nephropathy variants associate with lower levels of subclinical atherosclerosis and reduced risk of death in AAs with type 2 diabetes mellitus.Kidney International advance online publication, 23 July 2014; doi:10.1038/ki.2014.255.
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Apolipoprotein L1 gene variants associate with prevalent kidney but not prevalent cardiovascular disease in the Systolic Blood Pressure Intervention Trial.
Kidney Int.
PUBLISHED: 03-17-2014
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Apolipoprotein L1 gene (APOL1) G1 and G2 coding variants are strongly associated with chronic kidney disease (CKD) in African Americans (AAs). Here APOL1 association was tested with baseline estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), urine albumin:creatinine ratio (UACR), and prevalent cardiovascular disease (CVD) in 2571 AAs from the Systolic Blood Pressure Intervention Trial (SPRINT), a trial assessing effects of systolic blood pressure reduction on renal and CVD outcomes. Logistic regression models that adjusted for potentially important confounders tested for association between APOL1 risk variants and baseline clinical CVD (myocardial infarction, coronary, or carotid artery revascularization) and CKD (eGFR under 60?ml/min per 1.73?m(2) and/or UACR over 30?mg/g). AA SPRINT participants were 45.3% female with a mean (median) age of 64.3 (63) years, mean arterial pressure 100.7 (100)?mm?Hg, eGFR 76.3 (77.1) ml/min per 1.73?m(2), and UACR 49.9 (9.2)?mg/g, and 8.2% had clinical CVD. APOL1 (recessive inheritance) was positively associated with CKD (odds ratio 1.37, 95% confidence interval 1.08-1.73) and log UACR estimated slope (?) 0.33) and negatively associated with eGFR (? -3.58), all significant. APOL1 risk variants were not significantly associated with prevalent CVD (1.02, 0.82-1.27). Thus, SPRINT data show that APOL1 risk variants are associated with mild CKD but not with prevalent CVD in AAs with a UACR under 1000?mg/g.Kidney International advance online publication, 16 July 2014; doi:10.1038/ki.2014.254.
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Two functional lupus-associated BLK promoter variants control cell-type- and developmental-stage-specific transcription.
Am. J. Hum. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 03-12-2014
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Efforts to identify lupus-associated causal variants in the FAM167A/BLK locus on 8p21 are hampered by highly associated noncausal variants. In this report, we used a trans-population mapping and sequencing strategy to identify a common variant (rs922483) in the proximal BLK promoter and a tri-allelic variant (rs1382568) in the upstream alternative BLK promoter as putative causal variants for association with systemic lupus erythematosus. The risk allele (T) at rs922483 reduced proximal promoter activity and modulated alternative promoter usage. Allelic differences at rs1382568 resulted in altered promoter activity in B progenitor cell lines. Thus, our results demonstrated that both lupus-associated functional variants contribute to the autoimmune disease association by modulating transcription of BLK in B cells and thus potentially altering immune responses.
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Complement factor H gene associations with end-stage kidney disease in African Americans.
Nephrol. Dial. Transplant.
PUBLISHED: 02-28-2014
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Mutations in the complement factor H gene (CFH) region associate with renal-limited mesangial proliferative forms of glomerulonephritis including IgA nephropathy (IgAN), dense deposit disease (DDD) and C3 glomerulonephritis (C3GN). Lack of kidney biopsies could lead to under diagnosis of CFH-associated end-stage kidney disease (ESKD) in African Americans (AAs), with incorrect attribution to other causes. A prior genome-wide association study in AAs with non-diabetic ESKD implicated an intronic CFH single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP).
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Genetic risk score associations with cardiovascular disease and mortality in the Diabetes Heart Study.
Diabetes Care
PUBLISHED: 02-26-2014
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OBJECTIVE Given the high rates of cardiovascular disease (CVD) and associated mortality in individuals with type 2 diabetes, identifying and understanding predictors of CVD events and mortality could help inform clinical management in this high-risk group. Recent large-scale genetic studies may provide additional tools in this regard. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Genetic risk scores (GRSs) were constructed in 1,175 self-identified European American (EA) individuals comprising the family-based Diabetes Heart Study based on 1) 13 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and 2) 30 SNPs with previously documented associations with CVD in genome-wide association studies. Associations between each GRS and a self-reported history of CVD, coronary artery calcified plaque (CAC) determined by noncontrast computed tomography scan, all-cause mortality, and CVD mortality were examined using marginal models with generalized estimating equations and Cox proportional hazards models. RESULTS The weighted 13-SNP GRS was associated with prior CVD (odds ratio [OR] 1.51 [95% CI 1.22-1.86]; P = 0.0002), CAC (?-coefficient [?] 0.22 [0.02-0.43]; P = 0.04) and CVD mortality (hazard ratio [HR] 1.35 [1.10-1.81]; P = 0.04) when adjusting for the other known CVD risk factors: age, sex, type 2 diabetes affection status, BMI, current smoking status, hypertension, and dyslipidemia. The weighted 30-SNP GRS was also associated with prior CVD (OR 1.33 [1.08-1.65]; P = 0.008), CAC (? 0.29 [0.08-0.50]; P = 0.006), all-cause mortality (HR 1.28 [1.05-1.56]; P = 0.01), and CVD mortality (HR 1.46 [1.08-1.96]; P = 0.01). CONCLUSIONS These findings support the utility of two simple GRSs in examining genetic associations for adverse outcomes in EAs with type 2 diabetes.
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Meta-analysis of genome-wide association studies identifies 1q22 as a susceptibility locus for intracerebral hemorrhage.
Am. J. Hum. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 02-24-2014
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Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is the stroke subtype with the worst prognosis and has no established acute treatment. ICH is classified as lobar or nonlobar based on the location of ruptured blood vessels within the brain. These different locations also signal different underlying vascular pathologies. Heritability estimates indicate a substantial genetic contribution to risk of ICH in both locations. We report a genome-wide association study of this condition that meta-analyzed data from six studies that enrolled individuals of European ancestry. Case subjects were ascertained by neurologists blinded to genotype data and classified as lobar or nonlobar based on brain computed tomography. ICH-free control subjects were sampled from ambulatory clinics or random digit dialing. Replication of signals identified in the discovery cohort with p < 1 × 10(-6) was pursued in an independent multiethnic sample utilizing both direct and genome-wide genotyping. The discovery phase included a case cohort of 1,545 individuals (664 lobar and 881 nonlobar cases) and a control cohort of 1,481 individuals and identified two susceptibility loci: for lobar ICH, chromosomal region 12q21.1 (rs11179580, odds ratio [OR] = 1.56, p = 7.0 × 10(-8)); and for nonlobar ICH, chromosomal region 1q22 (rs2984613, OR = 1.44, p = 1.6 × 10(-8)). The replication included a case cohort of 1,681 individuals (484 lobar and 1,194 nonlobar cases) and a control cohort of 2,261 individuals and corroborated the association for 1q22 (p = 6.5 × 10(-4); meta-analysis p = 2.2 × 10(-10)) but not for 12q21.1 (p = 0.55; meta-analysis p = 2.6 × 10(-5)). These results demonstrate biological heterogeneity across ICH subtypes and highlight the importance of ascertaining ICH cases accordingly.
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Heritability and genetic association analysis of cognition in the Diabetes Heart Study.
Neurobiol. Aging
PUBLISHED: 02-15-2014
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Cognitive performance is an important component of healthy aging. Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is associated with negative outcomes for the brain and cognition, although causal mechanisms have not been definitely determined. Genetic risk factors warrant further consideration in this context. This study examined the heritability of cognitive function as assessed by (1) the Digit Symbol Substitution Task; (2) the Modified Mini-Mental State Examination; (3) the Stroop Task; (4) the Rey Auditory-Verbal Learning Task; and (5) the Controlled Oral Word Association Task for Phonemic and Semantic Fluency, in the family-based, T2D-enriched, Diabetes Heart Study sample (n = 550 participants from 257 families). The genetic basis of these cognitive measures was further evaluated by association analysis with candidate single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and genome-wide SNP data. Measures of cognitive function were significantly heritable (hˆ(2) = 0.28-0.62) following adjustment for age, gender, and education. A total of 31 SNPs (from 26 genes/regions) selected to form an a priori set of candidate SNPs showed limited evidence of association with cognitive function when applying conservative metrics of significance. Genome-wide assessment of both noncoding and coding variants revealed suggestive evidence of association for several coding variants including rs139509083 in CNST (p = 4.9 × 10(-9)), rs199968569 in PLAA (p = 4.9 × 10(-9)) and rs138487371 in PCDH8 (p = 3.7 × 10(-8)). The identification of a heritable component to cognitive performance in T2D suggests a role for genetic contributors to cognitive performance even in the presence of metabolic disease and other associated comorbidities and is supported by the identification of genetic association signals in functionally plausible candidates.
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Genome-wide family-based linkage analysis of exome chip variants and cardiometabolic risk.
Genet. Epidemiol.
PUBLISHED: 02-14-2014
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Linkage analysis of complex traits has had limited success in identifying trait-influencing loci. Recently, coding variants have been implicated as the basis for some biomedical associations. We tested whether coding variants are the basis for linkage peaks of complex traits in 42 African-American (n = 596) and 90 Hispanic (n = 1,414) families in the Insulin Resistance Atherosclerosis Family Study (IRASFS) using Illumina HumanExome Beadchips. A total of 92,157 variants in African Americans (34%) and 81,559 (31%) in Hispanics were polymorphic and tested using two-point linkage and association analyses with 37 cardiometabolic phenotypes. In African Americans 77 LOD scores greater than 3 were observed. The highest LOD score was 4.91 with the APOE SNP rs7412 (MAF = 0.13) with plasma apolipoprotein B (ApoB). This SNP was associated with ApoB (P-value = 4 × 10(-19)) and accounted for 16.2% of the variance in African Americans. In Hispanic families, 104 LOD scores were greater than 3. The strongest evidence of linkage (LOD = 4.29) was with rs5882 (MAF = 0.46) in CETP with HDL. CETP variants were strongly associated with HDL (0.00049 < P-value <4.6 × 10(-12)), accounting for up to 4.5% of the variance. These loci have previously been shown to have effects on the biomedical traits evaluated here. Thus, evidence of strong linkage in this genome wide survey of primarily coding variants was uncommon. Loci with strong evidence of linkage was characterized by large contributions to the variance, and, in these cases, are common variants. Less compelling evidence of linkage and association was observed with additional loci that may require larger family sets to confirm.
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End-stage renal disease in African Americans with lupus nephritis is associated with APOL1.
PUBLISHED: 02-08-2014
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Lupus nephritis (LN) is a severe manifestation of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) that exhibits familial aggregation and may progress to end-stage renal disease (ESRD). LN is more prevalent among African Americans than among European Americans. This study was undertaken to investigate the hypothesis that the apolipoprotein L1 gene (APOL1) nephropathy risk alleles G1/G2, common in African Americans and rare in European Americans, contribute to the ethnic disparity in risk.
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Genes associated with SLE are targets of recent positive selection.
Autoimmune Dis
PUBLISHED: 01-23-2014
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The reasons for the ethnic disparities in the prevalence of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and the relative high frequency of SLE risk alleles in the population are not fully understood. Population genetic factors such as natural selection alter allele frequencies over generations and may help explain the persistence of such common risk variants in the population and the differential risk of SLE. In order to better understand the genetic basis of SLE that might be due to natural selection, a total of 74 genomic regions with compelling evidence for association with SLE were tested for evidence of recent positive selection in the HapMap and HGDP populations, using population differentiation, allele frequency, and haplotype-based tests. Consistent signs of positive selection across different studies and statistical methods were observed at several SLE-associated loci, including PTPN22, TNFSF4, TET3-DGUOK, TNIP1, UHRF1BP1, BLK, and ITGAM genes. This study is the first to evaluate and report that several SLE-associated regions show signs of positive natural selection. These results provide corroborating evidence in support of recent positive selection as one mechanism underlying the elevated population frequency of SLE risk loci and supports future research that integrates signals of natural selection to help identify functional SLE risk alleles.
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Analysis of common and coding variants with cardiovascular disease in the Diabetes Heart Study.
Cardiovasc Diabetol
PUBLISHED: 01-14-2014
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Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a major cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factor. Identification of genetic risk factors for CVD is important to understand disease risk. Two recent genome-wide association study (GWAS) meta-analyses in the Cohorts for Heart and Aging Research in Genomic Epidemiology (CHARGE) consortium detected CVD-associated loci.
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Analysis of coding variants identified from exome sequencing resources for association with diabetic and non-diabetic nephropathy in African Americans.
Hum. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 01-03-2014
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Prior studies have identified common genetic variants influencing diabetic and non-diabetic nephropathy, diseases which disproportionately affect African Americans. Recently, exome sequencing techniques have facilitated identification of coding variants on a genome-wide basis in large samples. Exonic variants in known or suspected end-stage kidney disease (ESKD) or nephropathy genes can be tested for their ability to identify association either singly or in combination with known associated common variants. Coding variants in genes with prior evidence for association with ESKD or nephropathy were identified in the NHLBI-ESP GO database and genotyped in 5,045 African Americans (3,324 cases with type 2 diabetes associated nephropathy [T2D-ESKD] or non-T2D ESKD, and 1,721 controls) and 1,465 European Americans (568 T2D-ESKD cases and 897 controls). Logistic regression analyses were performed to assess association, with admixture and APOL1 risk status incorporated as covariates. Ten of 31 SNPs were associated in African Americans; four replicated in European Americans. In African Americans, SNPs in OR2L8, OR2AK2, C6orf167 (MMS22L), LIMK2, APOL3, APOL2, and APOL1 were nominally associated (P = 1.8 × 10(-4)-0.044). Haplotype analysis of common and coding variants increased evidence of association at the OR2L13 and APOL1 loci (P = 6.2 × 10(-5) and 4.6 × 10(-5), respectively). SNPs replicating in European Americans were in OR2AK2, LIMK2, and APOL2 (P = 0.0010-0.037). Meta-analyses highlighted four SNPs associated in T2D-ESKD and all-cause ESKD. Results from this study suggest a role for coding variants in the development of diabetic, non-diabetic, and/or all-cause ESKD in African Americans and/or European Americans.
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Evaluation of candidate nephropathy susceptibility genes in a genome-wide association study of African American diabetic kidney disease.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2014
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Type 2 diabetes (T2D)-associated end-stage kidney disease (ESKD) is a complex disorder resulting from the combined influence of genetic and environmental factors. This study contains a comprehensive genetic analysis of putative nephropathy loci in 965 African American (AA) cases with T2D-ESKD and 1029 AA population-based controls extending prior findings. Analysis was based on 4,341 directly genotyped and imputed single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 22 nephropathy candidate genes. After admixture adjustment and correction for multiple comparisons, 37 SNPs across eight loci were significantly associated (1.6E-05
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Sclerostin is positively associated with bone mineral density in men and women and negatively associated with carotid calcified atherosclerotic plaque in men from the african american-diabetes heart study.
J. Clin. Endocrinol. Metab.
PUBLISHED: 12-20-2013
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Context: Bone mineral density (BMD) and calcified atherosclerotic plaque (CP) demonstrate inverse relationships. Sclerostin, an endogenous regulator of the Wnt pathway and bone formation, has been associated with impaired osteoblast activation and may play a role in vascular calcification. Objective: Our objective was to assess the relationships between sclerostin, BMD, and CP. Design: Generalized linear models were fitted to test for associations between sclerostin, volumetric BMD (vBMD), and CP. Participants: A targeted population of 450 unrelated African Americans (AAs) with type 2 diabetes (T2D) was 56% female with mean/SD/median age of 55.4/9.5/55.0 years and a diabetes duration of 10.3/8.2/8.0 years. Main Outcome Measures: Plasma sclerostin, computed tomography-derived thoracic and lumbar vertebrae trabecular vBMD, coronary artery, carotid artery, and aortoiliac CP were measured. Results: Plasma sclerostin was 1119/401/1040 pg/mL, thoracic vBMD was 206.3/52.4/204.8 mg/cm(3), lumbar vBMD was 180.7/47.0/179.0 mg/cm(3), coronary artery CP score was 284/648/13, carotid artery CP score was 46/132/0, and aortoiliac CP score was 1613/2910/282. Sclerostin levels were higher in men than women (P < .0001). Before and after adjusting for age, sex, body mass index, blood pressure, smoking, hemoglobin A1c, and low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, plasma sclerostin levels were positively associated with thoracic and lumbar vertebrae vBMD (P < .0001). Sex-stratified analyses verified significant relationships in both men and women (both P < .001). Sclerostin was not associated with CP except for an inverse relationship with carotid CP in men (fully adjusted model, P = .03). Conclusions: In this cross-sectional study of AA men and women with T2D, circulating sclerostin was positively associated with vBMD in the spine in both sexes and inversely associated with carotid artery CP in men. Sclerostin may play a role in skeletal mineral metabolism in AA but fails to explain inverse relationships between BMD and CP.
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Gene-gene interactions in APOL1-associated nephropathy.
Nephrol. Dial. Transplant.
PUBLISHED: 10-24-2013
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Two APOL1 nephropathy variants confer substantial risk for non-diabetic end-stage kidney disease (ESKD) in African Americans (AAs). Since not all genetically high-risk individuals develop ESKD, modifying factors likely contribute. Forty-two potentially interactive single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from a genome-wide association study in non-diabetic ESKD were tested for interaction with APOL1 to identify genes modifying risk for non-diabetic nephropathy.
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Preferential binding to Elk-1 by SLE-associated IL10 risk allele upregulates IL10 expression.
PLoS Genet.
PUBLISHED: 10-01-2013
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Immunoregulatory cytokine interleukin-10 (IL-10) is elevated in sera from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) correlating with disease activity. The established association of IL10 with SLE and other autoimmune diseases led us to fine map causal variant(s) and to explore underlying mechanisms. We assessed 19 tag SNPs, covering the IL10 gene cluster including IL19, IL20 and IL24, for association with SLE in 15,533 case and control subjects from four ancestries. The previously reported IL10 variant, rs3024505 located at 1 kb downstream of IL10, exhibited the strongest association signal and was confirmed for association with SLE in European American (EA) (P?=?2.7×10??, OR?=?1.30), but not in non-EA ancestries. SNP imputation conducted in EA dataset identified three additional SLE-associated SNPs tagged by rs3024505 (rs3122605, rs3024493 and rs3024495 located at 9.2 kb upstream, intron 3 and 4 of IL10, respectively), and SLE-risk alleles of these SNPs were dose-dependently associated with elevated levels of IL10 mRNA in PBMCs and circulating IL-10 protein in SLE patients and controls. Using nuclear extracts of peripheral blood cells from SLE patients for electrophoretic mobility shift assays, we identified specific binding of transcription factor Elk-1 to oligodeoxynucleotides containing the risk (G) allele of rs3122605, suggesting rs3122605 as the most likely causal variant regulating IL10 expression. Elk-1 is known to be activated by phosphorylation and nuclear localization to induce transcription. Of interest, phosphorylated Elk-1 (p-Elk-1) detected only in nuclear extracts of SLE PBMCs appeared to increase with disease activity. Co-expression levels of p-Elk-1 and IL-10 were elevated in SLE T, B cells and monocytes, associated with increased disease activity in SLE B cells, and were best downregulated by ERK inhibitor. Taken together, our data suggest that preferential binding of activated Elk-1 to the IL10 rs3122605-G allele upregulates IL10 expression and confers increased risk for SLE in European Americans.
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Chromosome 2q31.1 associates with ESRD in women with type 1 diabetes.
J. Am. Soc. Nephrol.
PUBLISHED: 09-12-2013
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Sex and genetic variation influence the risk of developing diabetic nephropathy and ESRD in patients with type 1 diabetes. We performed a genome-wide association study in a cohort of 3652 patients from the Finnish Diabetic Nephropathy (FinnDiane) Study with type 1 diabetes to determine whether sex-specific genetic risk factors for ESRD exist. A common variant, rs4972593 on chromosome 2q31.1, was associated with ESRD in women (P<5×10(-8)) but not in men (P=0.77). This association was replicated in the meta-analysis of three independent type 1 diabetes cohorts (P=0.02) and remained significant for women (P<5×10(-8); odds ratio, 1.81 [95% confidence interval, 1.47 to 2.24]) upon combined meta-analysis of the discovery and replication cohorts. rs4972593 is located between the genes that code for the Sp3 transcription factor, which interacts directly with estrogen receptor ? and regulates the expression of genes linked to glomerular function and the pathogenesis of nephropathy, and the CDCA7 transcription factor, which regulates cell proliferation. Further examination revealed potential transcription factor-binding sites within rs4972593 and predicted eight estrogen-responsive elements within 5 kb of this locus. Moreover, we found sex-specific differences in the glomerular expression levels of SP3 (P=0.004). Overall, these results suggest that rs4972593 is a sex-specific genetic variant associated with ESRD in patients with type 1 diabetes and may underlie the sex-specific protection against ESRD.
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The Ethnic/Racial Variations of Intracerebral Hemorrhage (ERICH) study protocol.
Stroke
PUBLISHED: 09-10-2013
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Epidemiological studies of intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) have consistently demonstrated variation in incidence, location, age at presentation, and outcomes among non-Hispanic white, black, and Hispanic populations. We report here the design and methods for this large, prospective, multi-center case-control study of ICH.
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Apolipoprotein E, statins, and risk of intracerebral hemorrhage.
Stroke
PUBLISHED: 09-05-2013
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Apolipoprotein E (ApoE) genotypes have been associated with lobar intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Although statins have been associated with an increased risk of ICH, meta-analyses have not consistently shown a statin-induced risk of ICH. Here, we test whether hypercholesterolemia (HC) and ApoE polymorphisms affect the risk of ICH by statin use.
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ABIN1 dysfunction as a genetic basis for lupus nephritis.
J. Am. Soc. Nephrol.
PUBLISHED: 08-22-2013
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The genetic factors underlying the pathogenesis of lupus nephritis associated with systemic lupus erythematosus are largely unknown, although animal studies indicate that nuclear factor (NF)-?B is involved. We reported previously that a knockin mouse expressing an inactive form of ABIN1 (ABIN1[D485N]) develops lupus-like autoimmune disease and demonstrates enhanced activation of NF-?B and mitogen-activated protein kinases in immune cells after toll-like receptor stimulation. In the current study, we show that ABIN1[D485N] mice develop progressive GN similar to class III and IV lupus nephritis in humans. To investigate the clinical relevance of ABIN1 dysfunction, we genotyped five single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the gene encoding ABIN1, TNIP1, in samples from European-American, African American, Asian, Gullah, and Hispanic participants in the Large Lupus Association Study 2. Comparing cases of systemic lupus erythematosus with nephritis and cases of systemic lupus erythematosus without nephritis revealed strong associations with lupus nephritis at rs7708392 in European Americans and rs4958881 in African Americans. Comparing cases of systemic lupus erythematosus with nephritis and healthy controls revealed a stronger association at rs7708392 in European Americans but not at rs4958881 in African Americans. Our data suggest that variants in the TNIP1 gene are associated with the risk for lupus nephritis and could be mechanistically involved in disease development via aberrant regulation of NF-?B and mitogen-activated protein kinase activity.
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Genetic variants in selenoprotein P plasma 1 gene (SEPP1) are associated with fasting insulin and first phase insulin response in Hispanics.
Gene
PUBLISHED: 08-07-2013
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Insulin resistance is not fully explained on a molecular level, though several genes and proteins have been tied to this defect. Knockdowns of the SEPP1 gene, which encodes the selenoprotein P (SeP) protein, have been shown to increase insulin sensitivity in mice. SeP is a liver-derived plasma protein and a major supplier of selenium, which is a proposed insulin mimetic and antidiabetic agent.
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Testing gene-environment interactions in family-based association studies using trait-based ascertained samples.
Stat Med
PUBLISHED: 07-03-2013
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The study of gene-environment interactions is an increasingly important aspect of genetic epidemiological investigation. Historically, it has been difficult to study gene-environment interactions using a family-based design for quantitative traits or when parent-offspring trios were incomplete. The QBAT-I provides researchers a tool to estimate and test for a gene-environment interaction in families of arbitrary structure that are sampled without regard to the phenotype of interest, but is vulnerable to inflated type I error if families are ascertained on the basis of the phenotype. In this study, we verified the potential for type I error of the QBAT-I when applied to samples ascertained on a trait of interest. The magnitude of the inflation increases as the main genetic effect increases and as the ascertainment becomes more extreme. We propose an ascertainment-corrected score test that allows the use of the QBAT-I to test for gene-environment interactions in ascertained samples. Our results indicate that the score test and an ad hoc method we propose can often restore the nominal type I error rate, and in cases where complete restoration is not possible, dramatically reduce the inflation of the type I error rate in ascertained samples. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
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Trans-ancestral studies fine map the SLE-susceptibility locus TNFSF4.
PLoS Genet.
PUBLISHED: 07-01-2013
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We previously established an 80 kb haplotype upstream of TNFSF4 as a susceptibility locus in the autoimmune disease SLE. SLE-associated alleles at this locus are associated with inflammatory disorders, including atherosclerosis and ischaemic stroke. In Europeans, the TNFSF4 causal variants have remained elusive due to strong linkage disequilibrium exhibited by alleles spanning the region. Using a trans-ancestral approach to fine-map the locus, utilising 17,900 SLE and control subjects including Amerindian/Hispanics (1348 cases, 717 controls), African-Americans (AA) (1529, 2048) and better powered cohorts of Europeans and East Asians, we find strong association of risk alleles in all ethnicities; the AA association replicates in African-American Gullah (152,122). The best evidence of association comes from two adjacent markers: rs2205960-T (P=1.71 × 10(-34) , OR=1.43[1.26-1.60]) and rs1234317-T (P=1.16 × 10(-28) , OR=1.38[1.24-1.54]). Inference of fine-scale recombination rates for all populations tested finds the 80 kb risk and non-risk haplotypes in all except African-Americans. In this population the decay of recombination equates to an 11 kb risk haplotype, anchored in the 5 region proximal to TNFSF4 and tagged by rs2205960-T after 1000 Genomes phase 1 (v3) imputation. Conditional regression analyses delineate the 5 risk signal to rs2205960-T and the independent non-risk signal to rs1234314-C. Our case-only and SLE-control cohorts demonstrate robust association of rs2205960-T with autoantibody production. The rs2205960-T is predicted to form part of a decameric motif which binds NF-?Bp65 with increased affinity compared to rs2205960-G. ChIP-seq data also indicate NF-?B interaction with the DNA sequence at this position in LCL cells. Our research suggests association of rs2205960-T with SLE across multiple groups and an independent non-risk signal at rs1234314-C. rs2205960-T is associated with autoantibody production and lymphopenia. Our data confirm a global signal at TNFSF4 and a role for the expressed product at multiple stages of lymphocyte dysregulation during SLE pathogenesis. We confirm the validity of trans-ancestral mapping in a complex trait.
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Variants in adiponectin signaling pathway genes show little association with subclinical CVD in the diabetes heart study.
Obesity (Silver Spring)
PUBLISHED: 05-13-2013
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Understanding the interplay between adiposity, inflammation, and cardiovascular complications in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) remains a challenge. Signaling from adipocytes is considered important in this context. Adiponectin is the most abundant adipocytokine and has been associated with various measures of cardiovascular disease (CVD). This study examines the relationships between genetic variants in the adiponectin (ADIPOQ) and adiponectin-related signaling pathway genes and measures of subclinical CVD (vascular calcified plaque and carotid intima-media thickness), plasma lipids, and inflammation in T2DM.
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Impact of HDL genetic risk scores on coronary artery calcified plaque and mortality in individuals with type 2 diabetes from the Diabetes Heart Study.
Cardiovasc Diabetol
PUBLISHED: 05-03-2013
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Patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D) are at elevated risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD) events and mortality. Recent studies have assessed the impact of genetic variants affecting high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL) concentrations on CVD risk in the general population. This study examined the utility of HDL-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for CVD risk prediction in European Americans with T2D enrolled in the Diabetes Heart Study (DHS).
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Variable association of reactive intermediate genes with systemic lupus erythematosus in populations with different African ancestry.
J. Rheumatol.
PUBLISHED: 05-01-2013
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Little is known about the genetic etiology of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) in individuals of African ancestry, despite its higher prevalence and greater disease severity. Overproduction of nitric oxide (NO) and reactive oxygen species are implicated in the pathogenesis and severity of SLE, making NO synthases and other reactive intermediate-related genes biological candidates for disease susceptibility. We analyzed variation in reactive intermediate genes for association with SLE in 2 populations with African ancestry.
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Characterization of European ancestry nonalcoholic fatty liver disease-associated variants in individuals of African and Hispanic descent.
Hepatology
PUBLISHED: 04-03-2013
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Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is an obesity-related condition affecting over 50% of individuals in some populations and is expected to become the number one cause of liver disease worldwide by 2020. Common, robustly associated genetic variants in/near five genes were identified for hepatic steatosis, a quantifiable component of NAFLD, in European ancestry individuals. Here we tested whether these variants were associated with hepatic steatosis in African- and/or Hispanic-Americans and fine-mapped the observed association signals. We measured hepatic steatosis using computed tomography in five African American (n?=?3,124) and one Hispanic American (n?=?849) cohorts. All analyses controlled for variation in age, age(2) , gender, alcoholic drinks, and population substructure. Heritability of hepatic steatosis was estimated in three cohorts. Variants in/near PNPLA3, NCAN, LYPLAL1, GCKR, and PPP1R3B were tested for association with hepatic steatosis using a regression framework in each cohort and meta-analyzed. Fine-mapping across African American cohorts was conducted using meta-analysis. African- and Hispanic-American cohorts were 33.9/37.5% male, with average age of 58.6/42.6 years and body mass index of 31.8/28.9 kg/m(2) , respectively. Hepatic steatosis was 0.20-0.34 heritable in African- and Hispanic-American families (P?
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Relationships between serum adiponectin and bone density, adiposity and calcified atherosclerotic plaque in the African American-Diabetes Heart Study.
J. Clin. Endocrinol. Metab.
PUBLISHED: 03-29-2013
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Adiposity, bone mineral density (BMD), and calcified atherosclerotic plaque (CP) exhibit complex interrelationships that are not well understood. Adipokines vary in relation to changes in body composition and may play roles in regulation of BMD and risk of cardiovascular disease.
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Dense genotyping of immune-related disease regions identifies 14 new susceptibility loci for juvenile idiopathic arthritis.
Nat. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 03-25-2013
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We used the Immunochip array to analyze 2,816 individuals with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), comprising the most common subtypes (oligoarticular and rheumatoid factor-negative polyarticular JIA), and 13,056 controls. We confirmed association of 3 known JIA risk loci (the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) region, PTPN22 and PTPN2) and identified 14 loci reaching genome-wide significance (P < 5 × 10(-8)) for the first time. Eleven additional new regions showed suggestive evidence of association with JIA (P < 1 × 10(-6)). Dense mapping of loci along with bioinformatics analysis refined the associations to one gene in each of eight regions, highlighting crucial pathways, including the interleukin (IL)-2 pathway, in JIA disease pathogenesis. The entire Immunochip content, the HLA region and the top 27 loci (P < 1 × 10(-6)) explain an estimated 18, 13 and 6% of the risk of JIA, respectively. In summary, this is the largest collection of JIA cases investigated so far and provides new insight into the genetic basis of this childhood autoimmune disease.
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Association of SNPs in the UGT1A gene cluster with total bilirubin and mortality in the Diabetes Heart Study.
Atherosclerosis
PUBLISHED: 03-19-2013
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A negative relationship between total bilirubin concentration (TBili) and CVD risk has been documented in a series of epidemiological studies. In addition, TBili is thought to be under strong genetic regulation via the UGT1A gene family, suggesting it may be a heritable CVD risk factor. However, few studies directly relate TBili-associated UGT1A variants to CVD severity or outcome. This study replicated the genetic association for TBili in the Diabetes Heart Study (DHS), and examined the relationships of TBili-associated SNPs with measures of subclinical CVD and mortality.
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A meta-analysis identifies new loci associated with body mass index in individuals of African ancestry.
Keri L Monda, Gary K Chen, Kira C Taylor, Cameron Palmer, Todd L Edwards, Leslie A Lange, Maggie C Y Ng, Adebowale A Adeyemo, Matthew A Allison, Lawrence F Bielak, Guanjie Chen, Mariaelisa Graff, Marguerite R Irvin, Suhn K Rhie, Guo Li, Yongmei Liu, Youfang Liu, Yingchang Lu, Michael A Nalls, Yan V Sun, Mary K Wojczynski, Lisa R Yanek, Melinda C Aldrich, Adeyinka Ademola, Christopher I Amos, Elisa V Bandera, Cathryn H Bock, Angela Britton, Ulrich Broeckel, Quiyin Cai, Neil E Caporaso, Chris S Carlson, John Carpten, Graham Casey, Wei-Min Chen, Fang Chen, Yii-Der I Chen, Charleston W K Chiang, Gerhard A Coetzee, Ellen Demerath, Sandra L Deming-Halverson, Ryan W Driver, Patricia Dubbert, Mary F Feitosa, Ye Feng, Barry I Freedman, Elizabeth M Gillanders, Omri Gottesman, Xiuqing Guo, Talin Haritunians, Tamara Harris, Curtis C Harris, Anselm J M Hennis, Dena G Hernandez, Lorna H McNeill, Timothy D Howard, Barbara V Howard, Virginia J Howard, Karen C Johnson, Sun J Kang, Brendan J Keating, Suzanne Kolb, Lewis H Kuller, Abdullah Kutlar, Carl D Langefeld, Guillaume Lettre, Kurt Lohman, Vaneet Lotay, Helen Lyon, JoAnn E Manson, William Maixner, Yan A Meng, Kristine R Monroe, Imran Morhason-Bello, Adam B Murphy, Josyf C Mychaleckyj, Rajiv Nadukuru, Katherine L Nathanson, Uma Nayak, Amidou N'Diaye, Barbara Nemesure, Suh-Yuh Wu, M Cristina Leske, Christine Neslund-Dudas, Marian Neuhouser, Sarah Nyante, Heather Ochs-Balcom, Adesola Ogunniyi, Temidayo O Ogundiran, Oladosu Ojengbede, Olufunmilayo I Olopade, Julie R Palmer, Edward A Ruiz-Narváez, Nicholette D Palmer, Michael F Press, Evandine Rampersaud, Laura J Rasmussen-Torvik, Jorge L Rodriguez-Gil, Babatunde Salako, Eric E Schadt, Ann G Schwartz, Daniel A Shriner, David Siscovick, Shad B Smith, Sylvia Wassertheil-Smoller, Elizabeth K Speliotes, Margaret R Spitz, Lara Sucheston, Herman Taylor, Bamidele O Tayo, Margaret A Tucker, David J Van Den Berg, Digna R Velez Edwards, Zhaoming Wang, John K Wiencke, Thomas W Winkler, John S Witte, Margaret Wrensch, Xifeng Wu, James J Yang, Albert M Levin, Taylor R Young, Neil A Zakai, Mary Cushman, Krista A Zanetti, Jing Hua Zhao, Wei Zhao, Yonglan Zheng, Jie Zhou, Regina G Ziegler, Joseph M Zmuda, Jyotika K Fernandes, Gary S Gilkeson, Diane L Kamen, Kelly J Hunt, Ida J Spruill, Christine B Ambrosone, Stefan Ambs, Donna K Arnett, Larry Atwood, Diane M Becker, Sonja I Berndt, Leslie Bernstein, William J Blot, Ingrid B Borecki, Erwin P Bottinger, Donald W Bowden, Gregory Burke, Stephen J Chanock, Richard S Cooper, Jingzhong Ding, David Duggan, Michele K Evans, Caroline Fox, W Timothy Garvey, Jonathan P Bradfield, Hakon Hakonarson, Struan F A Grant, Ann Hsing, Lisa Chu, Jennifer J Hu, Dezheng Huo, Sue A Ingles, Esther M John, Joanne M Jordan, Edmond K Kabagambe, Sharon L R Kardia, Rick A Kittles, Phyllis J Goodman, Eric A Klein, Laurence N Kolonel, Loic Le Marchand, Simin Liu, Barbara McKnight, Robert C Millikan, Thomas H Mosley, Badri Padhukasahasram, L Keoki Williams, Sanjay R Patel, Ulrike Peters, Curtis A Pettaway, Patricia A Peyser, Bruce M Psaty, Susan Redline, Charles N Rotimi, Benjamin A Rybicki, Michèle M Sale, Pamela J Schreiner, Lisa B Signorello, Andrew B Singleton, Janet L Stanford, Sara S Strom, Michael J Thun, Mara Vitolins, Wei Zheng, Jason H Moore, Scott M Williams, Shamika Ketkar, Xiaofeng Zhu, Alan B Zonderman, , Charles Kooperberg, George J Papanicolaou, Brian E Henderson, Alex P Reiner, Joel N Hirschhorn, Ruth J F Loos, Kari E North, Christopher A Haiman.
Nat. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 03-18-2013
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Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified 36 loci associated with body mass index (BMI), predominantly in populations of European ancestry. We conducted a meta-analysis to examine the association of >3.2 million SNPs with BMI in 39,144 men and women of African ancestry and followed up the most significant associations in an additional 32,268 individuals of African ancestry. We identified one new locus at 5q33 (GALNT10, rs7708584, P = 3.4 × 10(-11)) and another at 7p15 when we included data from the GIANT consortium (MIR148A-NFE2L3, rs10261878, P = 1.2 × 10(-10)). We also found suggestive evidence of an association at a third locus at 6q16 in the African-ancestry sample (KLHL32, rs974417, P = 6.9 × 10(-8)). Thirty-two of the 36 previously established BMI variants showed directionally consistent effect estimates in our GWAS (binomial P = 9.7 × 10(-7)), five of which reached genome-wide significance. These findings provide strong support for shared BMI loci across populations, as well as for the utility of studying ancestrally diverse populations.
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JC polyoma virus interacts with APOL1 in African Americans with nondiabetic nephropathy.
Kidney Int.
PUBLISHED: 02-20-2013
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Individuals with HIV infection and two apolipoprotein L1 gene (APOL1) risk variants frequently develop nephropathy. Here we tested whether non-HIV viral infections influence nephropathy risk via interactions with APOL1 by assessing APOL1 genotypes and presence of urine JC and BK polyoma virus and plasma HHV6 and CMV by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. We analyzed 300 samples from unrelated and related first-degree relatives of African Americans with nondiabetic nephropathy using linear and nonlinear mixed models to account for familial relationships. The four groups evaluated were APOL1 zero/one versus two risk alleles, with or without nephropathy. Urine JCV and BKV were detected in 90 and 29 patients, respectively, whereas HHV6 and CMV were rare. Adjusting for family age at nephropathy, gender, and ancestry, presence of JCV genomic DNA in urine and APOL1 risk alleles were significantly negatively associated with elevated serum cystatin C, albuminuria (albumin-to-creatinine ratio over 30?mg/g), and kidney disease defined as an eGFR under 60?ml/min per 1.73?m(2) and/or albuminuria in an additive (APOL1 plus JCV) model. BK viruria was not associated with kidney disease. Thus, African Americans at increased risk for APOL1-associated nephropathy (two APOL1 risk variants) with JC viruria had a lower prevalence of kidney disease, suggesting that JCV interaction with APOL1 genotype may influence kidney disease risk.
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Admixture mapping in lupus identifies multiple functional variants within IFIH1 associated with apoptosis, inflammation, and autoantibody production.
PLoS Genet.
PUBLISHED: 02-18-2013
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Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an inflammatory autoimmune disease with a strong genetic component. African-Americans (AA) are at increased risk of SLE, but the genetic basis of this risk is largely unknown. To identify causal variants in SLE loci in AA, we performed admixture mapping followed by fine mapping in AA and European-Americans (EA). Through genome-wide admixture mapping in AA, we identified a strong SLE susceptibility locus at 2q22-24 (LOD=6.28), and the admixture signal is associated with the European ancestry (ancestry risk ratio ~1.5). Large-scale genotypic analysis on 19,726 individuals of African and European ancestry revealed three independently associated variants in the IFIH1 gene: an intronic variant, rs13023380 [P(meta) = 5.20×10(-14); odds ratio, 95% confidence interval = 0.82 (0.78-0.87)], and two missense variants, rs1990760 (Ala946Thr) [P(meta) = 3.08×10(-7); 0.88 (0.84-0.93)] and rs10930046 (Arg460His) [P(dom) = 1.16×10(-8); 0.70 (0.62-0.79)]. Both missense variants produced dramatic phenotypic changes in apoptosis and inflammation-related gene expression. We experimentally validated function of the intronic SNP by DNA electrophoresis, protein identification, and in vitro protein binding assays. DNA carrying the intronic risk allele rs13023380 showed reduced binding efficiency to a cellular protein complex including nucleolin and lupus autoantigen Ku70/80, and showed reduced transcriptional activity in vivo. Thus, in SLE patients, genetic susceptibility could create a biochemical imbalance that dysregulates nucleolin, Ku70/80, or other nucleic acid regulatory proteins. This could promote antibody hypermutation and auto-antibody generation, further destabilizing the cellular network. Together with molecular modeling, our results establish a distinct role for IFIH1 in apoptosis, inflammation, and autoantibody production, and explain the molecular basis of these three risk alleles for SLE pathogenesis.
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Genetic analysis of adiponectin variation and its association with type 2 diabetes in African Americans.
Obesity (Silver Spring)
PUBLISHED: 02-04-2013
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Adiponectin is an adipocytokine that has been implicated in a variety of metabolic disorders, including T2D and cardiovascular disease. Studies evaluating genetic variants in ADIPOQ have been contradictory when testing association with T2D in different ethnic groups.
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Genetic analysis of haptoglobin polymorphisms with cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes in the Diabetes Heart Study.
Cardiovasc Diabetol
PUBLISHED: 02-01-2013
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Haptoglobin (HP) is an acute phase protein that binds to freely circulating hemoglobin. HP exists as two distinct forms, HP1 and HP2. The longer HP2 form has been associated with cardiovascular (CVD) events and mortality in individuals with type 2 diabetes (T2DM).
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Usefulness of biventricular volume as a predictor of mortality in patients with diabetes mellitus (from the Diabetes Heart Study).
Am. J. Cardiol.
PUBLISHED: 01-23-2013
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Patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus are at increased risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD) and mortality. Beyond traditional CVD risk factors, novel measures reflecting additional aspects of disease pathophysiology, such as biventricular volume (BiVV), may be useful for risk stratification. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between BiVV and risk for mortality in European Americans with type 2 diabetes mellitus from the Diabetes Heart Study (DHS). BiVV was calculated from 771 noncontrast computed tomographic scans performed to image coronary artery calcified plaque. Relationships between BiVV and traditional CVD risk factors were examined. Cox proportional-hazards regression was performed to determine risk for mortality (all-cause and CVD mortality) associated with increasing BiVV. Area under the curve analysis was used to assess BiVV utility in risk prediction models. During 8.4 ± 2.4 years of follow-up, 23% of the patients died. In unadjusted analyses, BiVV was significantly associated with increasing body mass index, height, coronary artery calcified plaque, history of hypertension, and previous myocardial infarction (p <0.0001 to 0.012). BiVV was significantly associated with all-cause (hazard ratio 2.45, 95% confidence interval 1.06 to 5.67, p = 0.036) and CVD (hazard ratio 4.36, 95% confidence interval 1.36 to 14.03, p = 0.014) mortality in models adjusted for other known CVD risk factors. Area under the curve increased from 0.76 to 0.78 (p = 0.04) and from 0.74 to 0.77 (p = 0.02) for all-cause and CVD mortality with the inclusion of BiVV. In conclusion, in the absence of echocardiography or other noninvasive imaging modalities to assess ventricular volumes, or when such methods are contraindicated, BiVV from computed tomography may be considered a tool for the stratification of high-risk patients, such as those with type 2 diabetes mellitus.
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MicroRNA-3148 modulates allelic expression of toll-like receptor 7 variant associated with systemic lupus erythematosus.
PLoS Genet.
PUBLISHED: 01-08-2013
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We previously reported that the G allele of rs3853839 at 3untranslated region (UTR) of Toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7) was associated with elevated transcript expression and increased risk for systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) in 9,274 Eastern Asians [P?=?6.5×10(-10), odds ratio (OR) (95%CI)?=?1.27 (1.17-1.36)]. Here, we conducted trans-ancestral fine-mapping in 13,339 subjects including European Americans, African Americans, and Amerindian/Hispanics and confirmed rs3853839 as the only variant within the TLR7-TLR8 region exhibiting consistent and independent association with SLE (Pmeta?=?7.5×10(-11), OR?=?1.24 [1.18-1.34]). The risk G allele was associated with significantly increased levels of TLR7 mRNA and protein in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and elevated luciferase activity of reporter gene in transfected cells. TLR7 3UTR sequence bearing the non-risk C allele of rs3853839 matches a predicted binding site of microRNA-3148 (miR-3148), suggesting that this microRNA may regulate TLR7 expression. Indeed, miR-3148 levels were inversely correlated with TLR7 transcript levels in PBMCs from SLE patients and controls (R(2)?=?0.255, P?=?0.001). Overexpression of miR-3148 in HEK-293 cells led to significant dose-dependent decrease in luciferase activity for construct driven by TLR7 3UTR segment bearing the C allele (P?=?0.0003). Compared with the G-allele construct, the C-allele construct showed greater than two-fold reduction of luciferase activity in the presence of miR-3148. Reduced modulation by miR-3148 conferred slower degradation of the risk G-allele containing TLR7 transcripts, resulting in elevated levels of gene products. These data establish rs3853839 of TLR7 as a shared risk variant of SLE in 22,613 subjects of Asian, EA, AA, and Amerindian/Hispanic ancestries (Pmeta ?=?2.0×10(-19), OR?=?1.25 [1.20-1.32]), which confers allelic effect on transcript turnover via differential binding to the epigenetic factor miR-3148.
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A Genome-Wide Search for Linkage of Estimated Glomerular Filtration Rate (eGFR) in the Family Investigation of Nephropathy and Diabetes (FIND).
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
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Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), a measure of kidney function, is heritable, suggesting that genes influence renal function. Genes that influence eGFR have been identified through genome-wide association studies. However, family-based linkage approaches may identify loci that explain a larger proportion of the heritability. This study used genome-wide linkage and association scans to identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) that influence eGFR.
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PTPN22 association in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) with respect to individual ancestry and clinical sub-phenotypes.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
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Protein tyrosine phosphatase non-receptor type 22 (PTPN22) is a negative regulator of T-cell activation associated with several autoimmune diseases, including systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Missense rs2476601 is associated with SLE in individuals with European ancestry. Since the rs2476601 risk allele frequency differs dramatically across ethnicities, we assessed robustness of PTPN22 association with SLE and its clinical sub-phenotypes across four ethnically diverse populations. Ten SNPs were genotyped in 8220 SLE cases and 7369 controls from in European-Americans (EA), African-Americans (AA), Asians (AS), and Hispanics (HS). We performed imputation-based association followed by conditional analysis to identify independent associations. Significantly associated SNPs were tested for association with SLE clinical sub-phenotypes, including autoantibody profiles. Multiple testing was accounted for by using false discovery rate. We successfully imputed and tested allelic association for 107 SNPs within the PTPN22 region and detected evidence of ethnic-specific associations from EA and HS. In EA, the strongest association was at rs2476601 (P = 4.7 × 10(-9), OR = 1.40 (95% CI = 1.25-1.56)). Independent association with rs1217414 was also observed in EA, and both SNPs are correlated with increased European ancestry. For HS imputed intronic SNP, rs3765598, predicted to be a cis-eQTL, was associated (P = 0.007, OR = 0.79 and 95% CI = 0.67-0.94). No significant associations were observed in AA or AS. Case-only analysis using lupus-related clinical criteria revealed differences between EA SLE patients positive for moderate to high titers of IgG anti-cardiolipin (aCL IgG >20) versus negative aCL IgG at rs2476601 (P = 0.012, OR = 1.65). Association was reinforced when these cases were compared to controls (P = 2.7 × 10(-5), OR = 2.11). Our results validate that rs2476601 is the most significantly associated SNP in individuals with European ancestry. Additionally, rs1217414 and rs3765598 may be associated with SLE. Further studies are required to confirm the involvement of rs2476601 with aCL IgG.
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Lupus-associated causal mutation in neutrophil cytosolic factor 2 (NCF2) brings unique insights to the structure and function of NADPH oxidase.
Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.
PUBLISHED: 12-27-2011
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Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), the prototypic systemic autoimmune disease, is a debilitating multisystem autoimmune disorder characterized by chronic inflammation and extensive immune dysregulation in multiple organ systems, resulting in significant morbidity and mortality. Here, we present a multidisciplinary approach resulting in the identification of neutrophil cytosolic factor 2 (NCF2) as an important risk factor for SLE and the detailed characterization of its causal variant. We show that NCF2 is strongly associated with increased SLE risk in two independent populations: childhood-onset SLE and adult-onset SLE. The association between NCF2 and SLE can be attributed to a single nonsynonymous coding mutation in exon 12, the effect of which is the substitution of histidine-389 with glutamine (H389Q) in the PB1 domain of the NCF2 protein, with glutamine being the risk allele. Computational modeling suggests that the NCF2 H389Q mutation reduces the binding efficiency of NCF2 with the guanine nucleotide exchange factor Vav1. The model predicts that NCF2/H389 residue interacts with Vav1 residues E509, N510, E556, and G559 in the ZF domain of Vav1. Furthermore, replacing H389 with Q results in 1.5 kcal/mol weaker binding. To examine the effect of the NCF2 H389Q mutation on NADPH oxidase function, site-specific mutations at the 389 position in NCF2 were tested. Results show that an H389Q mutation causes a twofold decrease in reactive oxygen species production induced by the activation of the Vav-dependent Fc? receptor-elicited NADPH oxidase activity. Our study completes the chain of evidence from genetic association to specific molecular function.
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Analysis of autosomal genes reveals gene-sex interactions and higher total genetic risk in men with systemic lupus erythematosus.
Ann. Rheum. Dis.
PUBLISHED: 11-21-2011
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Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a sexually dimorphic autoimmune disease which is more common in women, but affected men often experience a more severe disease. The genetic basis of sexual dimorphism in SLE is not clearly defined. A study was undertaken to examine sex-specific genetic effects among SLE susceptibility loci.
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Polymorphisms in MYH9 are associated with diabetic nephropathy in European Americans.
Nephrol. Dial. Transplant.
PUBLISHED: 10-03-2011
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Polymorphisms in the non-muscle myosin IIA gene (MYH9) are associated with focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) and non-diabetic end-stage renal disease (ESRD) in African Americans and FSGS in European Americans. We tested for association of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in MYH9 with T2DM-ESRD in European Americans; additionally, three APOL1 gene variants were evaluated.
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Apolipoprotein L1 nephropathy risk variants associate with HDL subfraction concentration in African Americans.
Nephrol. Dial. Transplant.
PUBLISHED: 09-19-2011
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Coding variants in the apolipoprotein L1 gene (APOL1) are strongly associated with non-diabetic nephropathy in African Americans. ApoL1 proteins associate with high-density lipoprotein (HDL) particles in the circulation. Plasma HDL particle subclass concentrations were compared in 73 African Americans based on APOL1 genotypes to detect differences potentially contributing to renal disease.
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Sickle cell trait is not independently associated with susceptibility to end-stage renal disease in African Americans.
Kidney Int.
PUBLISHED: 08-17-2011
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Conflicting reports exist as to whether sickle cell trait is a risk factor for the progression of nephropathy. In order to determine whether African Americans with sickle cell trait are at increased risk for kidney disease, we assessed the genetic association between sickle cell trait and end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Hemoglobin S, non-muscle myosin heavy chain 9 (MYH9), and apolipoprotein L1 (APOL1) risk variants were genotyped in 3258 unrelated African Americans: 1085 with non-diabetic ESRD, 996 with type 2 diabetes-associated ESRD, and 1177 controls. Since APOL1 is strongly associated with ESRD in African Americans, interactions between APOL1 and MYH9 risk variants and hemoglobin S were assessed using case-only and case-control centered two-way logistic regression interaction analyses. The sickle cell trait genotype frequencies were 8.7% in non-diabetic ESRD, 7.1% in type 2 diabetes-ESRD, and 7.2% in controls. There was no age-, gender-, and admixture-adjusted significance for sickle cell trait association with non-diabetic ESRD (odds ratio 1.16); type 2 diabetes-ESRD (odds ratio 1.01); or all-cause ESRD (combined non-diabetic and type 2 diabetic-ESRD patients compared to the controls; odds ratio 1.05) in dominant models. In addition, no evidence of APOL1 or MYH9 interactions with sickle cell trait was detected. Hence, sickle cell trait is not associated with diabetic or non-diabetic ESRD in a large sample of African Americans.
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Genetic variants in novel pathways influence blood pressure and cardiovascular disease risk.
, Georg B Ehret, Patricia B Munroe, Kenneth M Rice, Murielle Bochud, Andrew D Johnson, Daniel I Chasman, Albert V Smith, Martin D Tobin, Germaine C Verwoert, Shih-Jen Hwang, Vasyl Pihur, Peter Vollenweider, Paul F O'Reilly, Najaf Amin, Jennifer L Bragg-Gresham, Alexander Teumer, Nicole L Glazer, Lenore Launer, Jing Hua Zhao, Yurii Aulchenko, Simon Heath, Siim Sõber, Afshin Parsa, Jian'an Luan, Pankaj Arora, Abbas Dehghan, Feng Zhang, Gavin Lucas, Andrew A Hicks, Anne U Jackson, John F Peden, Toshiko Tanaka, Sarah H Wild, Igor Rudan, Wilmar Igl, Yuri Milaneschi, Alex N Parker, Cristiano Fava, John C Chambers, Ervin R Fox, Meena Kumari, Min Jin Go, Pim van der Harst, Wen Hong Linda Kao, Marketa Sjögren, D G Vinay, Myriam Alexander, Yasuharu Tabara, Sue Shaw-Hawkins, Peter H Whincup, Yongmei Liu, Gang Shi, Johanna Kuusisto, Bamidele Tayo, Mark Seielstad, Xueling Sim, Khanh-Dung Hoang Nguyen, Terho Lehtimäki, Giuseppe Matullo, Ying Wu, Tom R Gaunt, N Charlotte Onland-Moret, Matthew N Cooper, Carl G P Platou, Elin Org, Rebecca Hardy, Santosh Dahgam, Jutta Palmen, Veronique Vitart, Peter S Braund, Tatiana Kuznetsova, Cuno S P M Uiterwaal, Adebowale Adeyemo, Walter Palmas, Harry Campbell, Barbara Ludwig, Maciej Tomaszewski, Ioanna Tzoulaki, Nicholette D Palmer, Thor Aspelund, Melissa Garcia, Yen-Pei C Chang, Jeffrey R O'Connell, Nanette I Steinle, Diederick E Grobbee, Dan E Arking, Sharon L Kardia, Alanna C Morrison, Dena Hernandez, Samer Najjar, Wendy L McArdle, David Hadley, Morris J Brown, John M Connell, Aroon D Hingorani, Ian N M Day, Debbie A Lawlor, John P Beilby, Robert W Lawrence, Robert Clarke, Jemma C Hopewell, Halit Ongen, Albert W Dreisbach, Yali Li, J Hunter Young, Joshua C Bis, Mika Kähönen, Jorma Viikari, Linda S Adair, Nanette R Lee, Ming-Huei Chen, Matthias Olden, Cristian Pattaro, Judith A Hoffman Bolton, Anna Köttgen, Sven Bergmann, Vincent Mooser, Nish Chaturvedi, Timothy M Frayling, Muhammad Islam, Tazeen H Jafar, Jeanette Erdmann, Smita R Kulkarni, Stefan R Bornstein, Jürgen Gräßler, Leif Groop, Benjamin F Voight, Johannes Kettunen, Philip Howard, Andrew Taylor, Simonetta Guarrera, Fulvio Ricceri, Valur Emilsson, Andrew Plump, Inês Barroso, Kay-Tee Khaw, Alan B Weder, Steven C Hunt, Yan V Sun, Richard N Bergman, Francis S Collins, Lori L Bonnycastle, Laura J Scott, Heather M Stringham, Leena Peltonen, Markus Perola, Erkki Vartiainen, Stefan-Martin Brand, Jan A Staessen, Thomas J Wang, Paul R Burton, María Soler Artigas, Yanbin Dong, Harold Snieder, Xiaoling Wang, Haidong Zhu, Kurt K Lohman, Megan E Rudock, Susan R Heckbert, Nicholas L Smith, Kerri L Wiggins, Ayo Doumatey, Daniel Shriner, Gudrun Veldre, Margus Viigimaa, Sanjay Kinra, Dorairaj Prabhakaran, Vikal Tripathy, Carl D Langefeld, Annika Rosengren, Dag S Thelle, Anna Maria Corsi, Andrew Singleton, Terrence Forrester, Gina Hilton, Colin A McKenzie, Tunde Salako, Naoharu Iwai, Yoshikuni Kita, Toshio Ogihara, Takayoshi Ohkubo, Tomonori Okamura, Hirotsugu Ueshima, Satoshi Umemura, Susana Eyheramendy, Thomas Meitinger, H-Erich Wichmann, Yoon Shin Cho, Hyung-Lae Kim, Jong-Young Lee, James Scott, Joban S Sehmi, Weihua Zhang, Bo Hedblad, Peter Nilsson, George Davey Smith, Andrew Wong, Narisu Narisu, Alena Stančáková, Leslie J Raffel, Jie Yao, Sekar Kathiresan, Christopher J O'Donnell, Stephen M Schwartz, M Arfan Ikram, W T Longstreth, Thomas H Mosley, Sudha Seshadri, Nick R G Shrine, Louise V Wain, Mario A Morken, Amy J Swift, Jaana Laitinen, Inga Prokopenko, Paavo Zitting, Jackie A Cooper, Steve E Humphries, John Danesh, Asif Rasheed, Anuj Goel, Anders Hamsten, Hugh Watkins, Stephan J L Bakker, Wiek H van Gilst, Charles S Janipalli, K Radha Mani, Chittaranjan S Yajnik, Albert Hofman, Francesco U S Mattace-Raso, Ben A Oostra, Ayse Demirkan, Aaron Isaacs, Fernando Rivadeneira, Edward G Lakatta, Marco Orrù, Angelo Scuteri, Mika Ala-Korpela, Antti J Kangas, Leo-Pekka Lyytikäinen, Pasi Soininen, Taru Tukiainen, Peter Würtz, Rick Twee-Hee Ong, Marcus Dörr, Heyo K Kroemer, Uwe Völker, Henry Völzke, Pilar Galán, Serge Hercberg, Mark Lathrop, Diana Zelenika, Panos Deloukas, Massimo Mangino, Tim D Spector, Guangju Zhai, James F Meschia, Michael A Nalls, Pankaj Sharma, Janos Terzic, M V Kranthi Kumar, Matthew Denniff, Ewa Zukowska-Szczechowska, Lynne E Wagenknecht, F Gerald R Fowkes, Fadi J Charchar, Peter E H Schwarz, Caroline Hayward, Xiuqing Guo, Charles Rotimi, Michiel L Bots, Eva Brand, Nilesh J Samani, Ozren Polašek, Philippa J Talmud, Fredrik Nyberg, Diana Kuh, Maris Laan, Kristian Hveem, Lyle J Palmer, Yvonne T van der Schouw, Juan P Casas, Karen L Mohlke, Paolo Vineis, Olli Raitakari, Santhi K Ganesh, Tien Y Wong, E Shyong Tai, Richard S Cooper, Markku Laakso, Dabeeru C Rao, Tamara B Harris, Richard W Morris, Anna F Dominiczak, Mika Kivimäki, Michael G Marmot, Tetsuro Miki, Danish Saleheen, Giriraj R Chandak, Josef Coresh, Gerjan Navis, Veikko Salomaa, Bok-Ghee Han, Xiaofeng Zhu, Jaspal S Kooner, Olle Melander, Paul M Ridker, Stefania Bandinelli, Ulf B Gyllensten, Alan F Wright, James F Wilson, Luigi Ferrucci, Martin Farrall, Jaakko Tuomilehto, Peter P Pramstaller, Roberto Elosua, Nicole Soranzo, Eric J G Sijbrands, David Altshuler, Ruth J F Loos, Alan R Shuldiner, Christian Gieger, Pierre Meneton, André G Uitterlinden, Nicholas J Wareham, Vilmundur Gudnason, Jerome I Rotter, Rainer Rettig, Manuela Uda, David P Strachan, Jacqueline C M Witteman, Anna-Liisa Hartikainen, Jacques S Beckmann, Eric Boerwinkle, Ramachandran S Vasan, Michael Boehnke, Martin G Larson, Marjo-Riitta Järvelin, Bruce M Psaty, Gonçalo R Abecasis, Aravinda Chakravarti, Paul Elliott, Cornelia M van Duijn, Christopher Newton-Cheh, Daniel Levy, Mark J Caulfield, Toby Johnson.
Nature
PUBLISHED: 07-28-2011
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Blood pressure is a heritable trait influenced by several biological pathways and responsive to environmental stimuli. Over one billion people worldwide have hypertension (?140?mm?Hg systolic blood pressure or? ?90?mm?Hg diastolic blood pressure). Even small increments in blood pressure are associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular events. This genome-wide association study of systolic and diastolic blood pressure, which used a multi-stage design in 200,000 individuals of European descent, identified sixteen novel loci: six of these loci contain genes previously known or suspected to regulate blood pressure (GUCY1A3-GUCY1B3, NPR3-C5orf23, ADM, FURIN-FES, GOSR2, GNAS-EDN3); the other ten provide new clues to blood pressure physiology. A genetic risk score based on 29 genome-wide significant variants was associated with hypertension, left ventricular wall thickness, stroke and coronary artery disease, but not kidney disease or kidney function. We also observed associations with blood pressure in East Asian, South Asian and African ancestry individuals. Our findings provide new insights into the genetics and biology of blood pressure, and suggest potential novel therapeutic pathways for cardiovascular disease prevention.
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Identification of novel genetic susceptibility loci in African American lupus patients in a candidate gene association study.
Arthritis Rheum.
PUBLISHED: 07-28-2011
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Candidate gene and genome-wide association studies have identified several disease susceptibility loci in lupus patients. These studies have largely been performed in lupus patients who are Asian or of European ancestry. This study was undertaken to examine whether some of these same susceptibility loci increase lupus risk in African American individuals.
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Differences in arachidonic acid levels and fatty acid desaturase (FADS) gene variants in African Americans and European Americans with diabetes or the metabolic syndrome.
Br. J. Nutr.
PUBLISHED: 07-04-2011
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Over the past 50 years, increases in dietary n-6 PUFA, such as linoleic acid, have been hypothesised to cause or exacerbate chronic inflammatory diseases. The present study examines an individuals innate capacity to synthesise n-6 long-chain PUFA (LC-PUFA) with respect to the fatty acid desaturase (FADS) locus in Americans of African and European descent with diabetes or the metabolic syndrome. Compared with European Americans (EAm), African Americans (AfAm) exhibited markedly higher serum levels of arachidonic acid (AA) (EAm 7·9 (sd 2·1), AfAm 9·8 (sd 1·9) % of total fatty acids; P < 2·29 × 10??) and the AA:n-6-precursor fatty acid ratio, which estimates FADS1 activity (EAm 5·4 (sd 2·2), AfAm 6·9 (sd 2·2); P = 1·44 × 10??). In all, seven SNP mapping to the FADS locus revealed strong association with AA, EPA and dihomo-?-linolenic acid (DGLA) in the EAm. Importantly, EAm homozygous for the minor allele (T) had significantly lower AA levels (TT 6·3 (sd 1·0); GG 8·5 (sd 2·1); P = 3·0 × 10??) and AA:DGLA ratios (TT 3·4 (sd 0·8), GG 6·5 (sd 2·3); P = 2·2 × 10??) but higher DGLA levels (TT 1·9 (sd 0·4), GG 1·4 (sd 0·4); P = 3·3 × 10??) compared with those homozygous for the major allele (GG). Allele frequency patterns suggest that the GG genotype at rs174537 (associated with higher circulating levels of AA) is much higher in AfAm (0·81) compared with EAm (0·46). Similarly, marked differences in rs174537 genotypic frequencies were observed in HapMap populations. These data suggest that there are probably important differences in the capacity of different populations to synthesise LC-PUFA. These differences may provide a genetic mechanism contributing to health disparities between populations of African and European descent.
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Genetic variation in the peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-gamma gene is associated with histologically advanced NAFLD.
Dig. Dis. Sci.
PUBLISHED: 07-01-2011
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The peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-gamma (PPARG) is a nuclear receptor that regulates adipocyte differentiation, insulin sensitivity and lipid metabolism, thus, it represents a good candidate gene for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD).
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Genome-wide association of BMI in African Americans.
Obesity (Silver Spring)
PUBLISHED: 06-23-2011
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Recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified multiple novel loci associated with obesity in Europeans but results in other ethnicities are less convincing. Here, we report a two-stage GWAS of BMI in African Americans. The GWAS was performed using the Affymetrix 6.0 platform in 816 nondiabetic and 899 diabetic nephropathy subjects. 746,626 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were tested for association with BMI after adjustment for age, gender, disease status, and population structure. Sixty high scoring SNPs that showed nominal association in both GWAS cohorts were further replicated in 3,274 additional subjects in four replication cohorts and a meta-analysis was computed. Meta-analysis of 4,989 subjects revealed five SNPs (rs6794092, rs268972, rs2033195, rs815611, and rs6088887) at four loci showing consistent associations in both GWAS (P < 0.0001) and replication cohorts (P < 0.05) with combined P values range from 2.4 × 10(-6) to 5 × 10(-5). These loci are located near PP13439-TMEM212, CDH12, MFAP3-GALNT10, and FER1L4 and had effect sizes between 0.091 and 0.167 s.d. unit (or 0.67-1.24 kg/m(2)) of BMI for each copy of the effect allele. Our findings suggest the presence of novel loci potentially associated with adiposity in African Americans. Further replication and meta-analysis in African Americans and other populations will shed light on the role of these loci in different ethnic populations.
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Meta-analysis of genome-wide linkage scans for renal function traits.
Nephrol. Dial. Transplant.
PUBLISHED: 05-28-2011
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Several genome scans have explored the linkage of chronic kidney disease phenotypes to chromosomic regions with disparate results. Genome scan meta-analysis (GSMA) is a quantitative method to synthesize linkage results from independent studies and assess their concordance.
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The impact of FADS genetic variants on ?6 polyunsaturated fatty acid metabolism in African Americans.
BMC Genet.
PUBLISHED: 05-20-2011
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Arachidonic acid (AA) is a long-chain omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) synthesized from the precursor dihomo-gamma-linolenic acid (DGLA) that plays a vital role in immunity and inflammation. Variants in the Fatty Acid Desaturase (FADS) family of genes on chromosome 11q have been shown to play a role in PUFA metabolism in populations of European and Asian ancestry; no work has been done in populations of African ancestry to date.
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Association of PPP2CA polymorphisms with systemic lupus erythematosus susceptibility in multiple ethnic groups.
Arthritis Rheum.
PUBLISHED: 05-19-2011
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T cells from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) express increased amounts of PP2Ac, which contributes to decreased production of interleukin-2 (IL-2). Because IL-2 is important in the regulation of several aspects of the immune response, it has been proposed that PP2Ac contributes to the expression of SLE. This study was designed to determine whether genetic variants of PPP2AC are linked to the expression of SLE and specific clinical manifestations and account for the increased expression of PP2Ac.
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Common variants in the periostin gene influence development of atherosclerosis in young persons.
Arterioscler. Thromb. Vasc. Biol.
PUBLISHED: 04-07-2011
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We investigated the influence of genetic variants (rare and common) in the gene encoding periostin (POSTN) on atherosclerosis as measured in arterial specimens from the Pathobiological Determinants of Atherosclerosis in Youth (PDAY) study.
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Relationships between calcified atherosclerotic plaque and bone mineral density in African Americans with type 2 diabetes.
J. Bone Miner. Res.
PUBLISHED: 03-26-2011
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Inverse relationships have been reported between bone mineral density (BMD) and calcified atherosclerotic plaque (CP). This suggests these processes may be related. We examined relationships between BMD and CP in 753 African Americans with type 2 diabetes from 664 families, accounting for the effects of modifiable cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors. Association analyses were performed using generalized estimating equations (GEEs) to assess cross-sectional relationships between computed tomography-determined measures of thoracic and lumbar vertebral volumetric BMD (vBMD) and CP in the coronary and carotid arteries and infrarenal aorta. Significant inverse associations were seen between thoracic and lumbar vBMD and CP in all three vascular beds in unadjusted analyses. A fully adjusted model accounting for age, sex, body mass index, systolic blood pressure, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, C-reactive protein, hemoglobin A(1c), smoking, and hormone-replacement therapy revealed significant inverse associations between thoracic vBMD and CP in coronary and carotid arteries and aorta, whereas lumbar vBMD was associated with CP in coronary artery and aorta. Inverse associations exist between vertebral BMD and calcified atherosclerotic plaque in African-American men and women with type 2 diabetes. This relationship was independent of conventional CVD risk factors and supports the hypothesis that bone metabolism and atherosclerotic plaque mineralization are related processes.
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Genetic analyses of interferon pathway-related genes reveal multiple new loci associated with systemic lupus erythematosus.
Arthritis Rheum.
PUBLISHED: 03-26-2011
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The overexpression of interferon (IFN)-inducible genes is a prominent feature of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE); it serves as a marker for active and more severe disease, and is also observed in other autoimmune and inflammatory conditions. This study was undertaken to investigate the genetic variations responsible for sustained activation of IFN-responsive genes in SLE.
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Fine-mapping and transethnic genotyping establish IL2/IL21 genetic association with lupus and localize this genetic effect to IL21.
Arthritis Rheum.
PUBLISHED: 03-23-2011
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Genetic association of the IL2/IL21 region at chromosome 4q27 has previously been reported in lupus and a number of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. This study was undertaken to determine whether this genetic effect could be localized, using a very large cohort of lupus patients and controls.
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A comprehensive analysis of shared loci between systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and sixteen autoimmune diseases reveals limited genetic overlap.
PLoS Genet.
PUBLISHED: 03-22-2011
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In spite of the well-known clustering of multiple autoimmune disorders in families, analyses of specific shared genes and polymorphisms between systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and other autoimmune diseases (ADs) have been limited. Therefore, we comprehensively tested autoimmune variants for association with SLE, aiming to identify pleiotropic genetic associations between these diseases. We compiled a list of 446 non-Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) variants identified in genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of populations of European ancestry across 17 ADs. We then tested these variants in our combined Caucasian SLE cohorts of 1,500 cases and 5,706 controls. We tested a subset of these polymorphisms in an independent Caucasian replication cohort of 2,085 SLE cases and 2,854 controls, allowing the computation of a meta-analysis between all cohorts. We have uncovered novel shared SLE loci that passed multiple comparisons adjustment, including the VTCN1 (rs12046117, P?=?2.02×10(-06)) region. We observed that the loci shared among the most ADs include IL23R, OLIG3/TNFAIP3, and IL2RA. Given the lack of a universal autoimmune risk locus outside of the MHC and variable specificities for different diseases, our data suggests partial pleiotropy among ADs. Hierarchical clustering of ADs suggested that the most genetically related ADs appear to be type 1 diabetes with rheumatoid arthritis and Crohns disease with ulcerative colitis. These findings support a relatively distinct genetic susceptibility for SLE. For many of the shared GWAS autoimmune loci, we found no evidence for association with SLE, including IL23R. Also, several established SLE loci are apparently not associated with other ADs, including the ITGAM-ITGAX and TNFSF4 regions. This study represents the most comprehensive evaluation of shared autoimmune loci to date, supports a relatively distinct non-MHC genetic susceptibility for SLE, provides further evidence for previously and newly identified shared genes in SLE, and highlights the value of studies of potentially pleiotropic genes in autoimmune diseases.
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JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.