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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Association of anti-RNA polymerase III autoantibodies and cancer in scleroderma.
Arthritis Res. Ther.
PUBLISHED: 01-28-2014
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We assessed the profile and frequency of malignancy subtypes in a large single-centre UK cohort for patients with scleroderma (systemic sclerosis; SSc). We evaluated the cancer risk among SSc patients with different antibody reactivities and explored the temporal association of cancer with the duration between SSc onset and cancer diagnosis.
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A genome-wide association study follow-up suggests a possible role for PPARG in systemic sclerosis susceptibility.
Arthritis Res. Ther.
PUBLISHED: 01-09-2014
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A recent genome-wide association study (GWAS) comprising a French cohort of systemic sclerosis (SSc) reported several non-HLA single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) showing a nominal association in the discovery phase. We aimed to identify previously overlooked susceptibility variants by using a follow-up strategy.
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Immunochip analysis identifies multiple susceptibility loci for systemic sclerosis.
Am. J. Hum. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 01-07-2014
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In this study, 1,833 systemic sclerosis (SSc) cases and 3,466 controls were genotyped with the Immunochip array. Classical alleles, amino acid residues, and SNPs across the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) region were imputed and tested. These analyses resulted in a model composed of six polymorphic amino acid positions and seven SNPs that explained the observed significant associations in the region. In addition, a replication step comprising 4,017 SSc cases and 5,935 controls was carried out for several selected non-HLA variants, reaching a total of 5,850 cases and 9,401 controls of European ancestry. Following this strategy, we identified and validated three SSc risk loci, including DNASE1L3 at 3p14, the SCHIP1-IL12A locus at 3q25, and ATG5 at 6q21, as well as a suggested association of the TREH-DDX6 locus at 11q23. The associations of several previously reported SSc risk loci were validated and further refined, and the observed peak of association in PXK was related to DNASE1L3. Our study has increased the number of known genetic associations with SSc, provided further insight into the pleiotropic effects of shared autoimmune risk factors, and highlighted the power of dense mapping for detecting previously overlooked susceptibility loci.
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A systemic sclerosis and systemic lupus erythematosus pan-meta-GWAS reveals new shared susceptibility loci.
Hum. Mol. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 06-04-2013
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Systemic sclerosis (SSc) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) are two archetypal systemic autoimmune diseases which have been shown to share multiple genetic susceptibility loci. In order to gain insight into the genetic basis of these diseases, we performed a pan-meta-analysis of two genome-wide association studies (GWASs) together with a replication stage including additional SSc and SLE cohorts. This increased the sample size to a total of 21,109 (6835 cases and 14,274 controls). We selected for replication 19 SNPs from the GWAS data. We were able to validate KIAA0319L (P = 3.31 × 10(-11), OR = 1.49) as novel susceptibility loci for SSc and SLE. Furthermore, we also determined that the previously described SLE susceptibility loci PXK (P = 3.27 × 10(-11), OR = 1.20) and JAZF1 (P = 1.11 × 10(-8), OR = 1.13) are shared with SSc. Supporting these new discoveries, we observed that KIAA0319L was overexpressed in peripheral blood cells of SSc and SLE patients compared with healthy controls. With these, we add three (KIAA0319L, PXK and JAZF1) and one (KIAA0319L) new susceptibility loci for SSc and SLE, respectively, increasing significantly the knowledge of the genetic basis of autoimmunity.
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New insight on the Xq28 association with systemic sclerosis.
Ann. Rheum. Dis.
PUBLISHED: 02-26-2013
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To evaluate whether the systemic sclerosis (SSc)-associated IRAK1 non-synonymous single-nucleotide polymorphism rs1059702 is responsible for the Xq28 association with SSc or whether there are other independent signals in the nearby methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 gene (MECP2).
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The systemic lupus erythematosus IRF5 risk haplotype is associated with systemic sclerosis.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-23-2013
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Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a fibrotic autoimmune disease in which the genetic component plays an important role. One of the strongest SSc association signals outside the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) region corresponds to interferon (IFN) regulatory factor 5 (IRF5), a major regulator of the type I IFN pathway. In this study we aimed to evaluate whether three different haplotypic blocks within this locus, which have been shown to alter the protein function influencing systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) susceptibility, are involved in SSc susceptibility and clinical phenotypes. For that purpose, we genotyped one representative single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) of each block (rs10488631, rs2004640, and rs4728142) in a total of 3,361 SSc patients and 4,012 unaffected controls of Caucasian origin from Spain, Germany, The Netherlands, Italy and United Kingdom. A meta-analysis of the allele frequencies was performed to analyse the overall effect of these IRF5 genetic variants on SSc. Allelic combination and dependency tests were also carried out. The three SNPs showed strong associations with the global disease (rs4728142: P ?=?1.34×10(-8), OR ?=?1.22, CI 95% ?=?1.14-1.30; rs2004640: P ?=?4.60×10(-7), OR ?=?0.84, CI 95% ?=?0.78-0.90; rs10488631: P ?=?7.53×10(-20), OR ?=?1.63, CI 95% ?=?1.47-1.81). However, the association of rs2004640 with SSc was not independent of rs4728142 (conditioned P ?=?0.598). The haplotype containing the risk alleles (rs4728142*A-rs2004640*T-rs10488631*C: P ?=?9.04×10(-22), OR ?=?1.75, CI 95% ?=?1.56-1.97) better explained the observed association (likelihood P-value ?=?1.48×10(-4)), suggesting an additive effect of the three haplotypic blocks. No statistical significance was observed in the comparisons amongst SSc patients with and without the main clinical characteristics. Our data clearly indicate that the SLE risk haplotype also influences SSc predisposition, and that this association is not sub-phenotype-specific.
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Mucin 5B promoter polymorphism is associated with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis but not with development of lung fibrosis in systemic sclerosis or sarcoidosis.
Thorax
PUBLISHED: 01-15-2013
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A polymorphism (rs35705950) 3 kb upstream of MUC5B, the gene encoding Mucin 5 subtype B, has been shown to be associated with familial and sporadic idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). We set out to verify whether this variant is also a risk factor for fibrotic lung disease in other settings and to confirm the published findings in a UK Caucasian IPF population.
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A GWAS follow-up study reveals the association of the IL12RB2 gene with systemic sclerosis in Caucasian populations.
Hum. Mol. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 11-10-2011
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A single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) at the IL12RB2 locus showed a suggestive association signal in a previously published genome-wide association study (GWAS) in systemic sclerosis (SSc). Aiming to reveal the possible implication of the IL12RB2 gene in SSc, we conducted a follow-up study of this locus in different Caucasian cohorts. We analyzed 10 GWAS-genotyped SNPs in the IL12RB2 region (2309 SSc patients and 5161 controls). We then selected three SNPs (rs3790567, rs3790566 and rs924080) based on their significance level in the GWAS, for follow-up in an independent European cohort comprising 3344 SSc and 3848 controls. The most-associated SNP (rs3790567) was further tested in an independent cohort comprising 597 SSc patients and 1139 controls from the USA. After conditional logistic regression analysis of the GWAS data, we selected rs3790567 [P(MH)= 1.92 × 10(-5) odds ratio (OR) = 1.19] as the genetic variant with the firmest independent association observed in the analyzed GWAS peak of association. After the first follow-up phase, only the association of rs3790567 was consistent (P(MH)= 4.84 × 10(-3) OR = 1.12). The second follow-up phase confirmed this finding (P(?2) = 2.82 × 10(-4) OR = 1.34). After performing overall pooled-analysis of all the cohorts included in the present study, the association found for the rs3790567 SNP in the IL12RB2 gene region reached GWAS-level significant association (P(MH)= 2.82 × 10(-9) OR = 1.17). Our data clearly support the IL12RB2 genetic association with SSc, and suggest a relevant role of the interleukin 12 signaling pathway in SSc pathogenesis.
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The genetics of scleroderma.
Curr Rheumatol Rep
PUBLISHED: 05-26-2011
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The importance of the genetic component in the pathogenesis of scleroderma, or systemic sclerosis, has been strengthened in the past 2 years with studies on genetic markers-either candidate gene or genome-wide association studies--in large case-control series. Multiple genes have been consistently associated with susceptibility to scleroderma, and interestingly, several of them are involved in immune regulation. Because many of these genes are shared with other autoimmune diseases, a common underlying autoimmune mechanism has been proposed. The challenge that lies ahead is to confirm these associations and to find markers or pathways that are unique to scleroderma and that may define its distinctive phenotype.
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Identification of novel genetic markers associated with clinical phenotypes of systemic sclerosis through a genome-wide association strategy.
PLoS Genet.
PUBLISHED: 05-25-2011
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The aim of this study was to determine, through a genome-wide association study (GWAS), the genetic components contributing to different clinical sub-phenotypes of systemic sclerosis (SSc). We considered limited (lcSSc) and diffuse (dcSSc) cutaneous involvement, and the relationships with presence of the SSc-specific auto-antibodies, anti-centromere (ACA), and anti-topoisomerase I (ATA). Four GWAS cohorts, comprising 2,296 SSc patients and 5,171 healthy controls, were meta-analyzed looking for associations in the selected subgroups. Eighteen polymorphisms were further tested in nine independent cohorts comprising an additional 3,175 SSc patients and 4,971 controls. Conditional analysis for associated SNPs in the HLA region was performed to explore their independent association in antibody subgroups. Overall analysis showed that non-HLA polymorphism rs11642873 in IRF8 gene to be associated at GWAS level with lcSSc (P?=?2.32×10(-12), OR?=?0.75). Also, rs12540874 in GRB10 gene (P?=?1.27 × 10(-6), OR?=?1.15) and rs11047102 in SOX5 gene (P?=?1.39×10(-7), OR?=?1.36) showed a suggestive association with lcSSc and ACA subgroups respectively. In the HLA region, we observed highly associated allelic combinations in the HLA-DQB1 locus with ACA (P?=?1.79×10(-61), OR?=?2.48), in the HLA-DPA1/B1 loci with ATA (P?=?4.57×10(-76), OR?=?8.84), and in NOTCH4 with ACA P?=?8.84×10(-21), OR?=?0.55) and ATA (P?=?1.14×10(-8), OR?=?0.54). We have identified three new non-HLA genes (IRF8, GRB10, and SOX5) associated with SSc clinical and auto-antibody subgroups. Within the HLA region, HLA-DQB1, HLA-DPA1/B1, and NOTCH4 associations with SSc are likely confined to specific auto-antibodies. These data emphasize the differential genetic components of subphenotypes of SSc.
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[Pulmonary actinomycosis simulating Tobias-Pancoast tumor].
Rev. Soc. Bras. Med. Trop.
PUBLISHED: 05-10-2011
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Actinomycosis is a rare infection that may involve several organs. Thoracic involvement is uncommon (10-20%). This article describes the case of a 33 year-old patient, HIV negative, complaining of burning pain in the left posterior chest radiating to the left upper arm and reduced strength and paresthesias. The CT scan showed a mass in close contact with the chest wall. Following a thoracotomy, observation verified a solid pulmonary lesion adhered to the left upper lobe, infiltrating the posterior thoracic wall and apex of the cavity with rich vascularization. An incisional biopsy of the lesion and microbiological study revealed actinomycosis.
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Endothelin in pulmonary fibrosis.
Am. J. Respir. Cell Mol. Biol.
PUBLISHED: 05-06-2010
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The endothelin receptor-ligand system includes a family of polypeptides and G-protein-coupled receptors, which, in addition to their classic activity in the regulation of vascular tone (both directly and through the control of nitric oxide), were implicated in a wide variety of other key biological processes. In this regard, the endothelins are potent mitogens and motogens for mesenchymal cells, and can induce cell differentiation, increasing both the synthesis and deposition of extracellular matrix components and contractile ability. The endothelins are produced as inactive pre-pro-polypeptides, with gene transcription (as well as the proteolytic processing to mature active forms) under the influence of many factors, including cytokines, hypoxia, biomechanical and shear stress, pathogen products, and many growth factors. These complex regulatory events underlie the association and potential role of endothelins in a number of human diseases affecting many different target organs, including the vasculature (atherosclerosis and hypertension), kidney (renal crisis and chronic kidney disease), heart (coronary heart disease), and lungs (pulmonary fibrosis and pulmonary hypertension). This review focuses on the biochemistry of endothelin and the pathobiology of endothelin in lung fibrosis, with particular emphasis on idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, and examines the antifibrotic potential of endothelin receptor antagonism.
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Neuronal regulators and vascular dysfunction in Raynauds phenomenon and systemic sclerosis.
Curr Vasc Pharmacol
PUBLISHED: 01-20-2009
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Raynauds phenomenon (RP) results from an exaggerated cutaneous vasospastic response to cold or emotional stress. The mechanisms that lead to impaired cutaneous vascular tone are complex. The regulation of cutaneous vasoconstriction and vasodilation, involves altered sympathetic nerve activity and a host of neuronal regulators, including adrenergic and non-adrenergic, as well as REDOX signalling and other signalling such as the RhoA/ROCK pathway. This review summarises the literature concerning the regulation of vascular tone by neurohumoral factors that may be involved in RP and systemic sclerosis (SSc).
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KCNA5 gene is not confirmed as a systemic sclerosis-related pulmonary arterial hypertension genetic susceptibility factor.
Arthritis Res. Ther.
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ABSTRACT: INTRODUCTION: Potassium voltage-gated channel shaker-related subfamily member 5 (KCNA5) is implicated in vascular tone regulation, and its inhibition during hypoxia produces pulmonary vasoconstriction. Recently, a protective association of the KCNA5 locus with systemic sclerosis (SSc) patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) was reported. Hence, the aim of this study was to replicate these findings in an independent multicenter Caucasian SSc cohort. METHODS: The 2,343 SSc cases (179 PAH positive, confirmed by right-heart catheterization) and 2,690 matched healthy controls from five European countries were included in this study. Rs10744676 single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) was genotyped by using a TaqMan SNP genotyping assay. RESULTS: Individual population analyses of the selected KCNA5 genetic variant did not show significant association with SSc or any of the defined subsets (for example, limited cutaneous SSc, diffuse cutaneous SSc, anti-centromere autoantibody positive and anti-topoisomerase autoantibody positive). Furthermore, pooled analyses revealed no significant evidence of association with the disease or any of the subsets, not even the PAH-positive group. The comparison of PAH-positive patients with PAH-negative patients showed no significant differences among patients. CONCLUSIONS: Our data do not support an important role of KCNA5 as an SSc-susceptibility factor or as a PAH-development genetic marker for SSc patients.
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Identification of CSK as a systemic sclerosis genetic risk factor through Genome Wide Association Study follow-up.
Hum. Mol. Genet.
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Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is complex autoimmune disease affecting the connective tissue; influenced by genetic and environmental components. Recently, we performed the first successful genome-wide association study (GWAS) of SSc. Here, we perform a large replication study to better dissect the genetic component of SSc. We selected 768 polymorphisms from the previous GWAS and genotyped them in seven replication cohorts from Europe. Overall significance was calculated for replicated significant SNPs by meta-analysis of the replication cohorts and replication-GWAS cohorts (3237 cases and 6097 controls). Six SNPs in regions not previously associated with SSc were selected for validation in another five independent cohorts, up to a total of 5270 SSc patients and 8326 controls. We found evidence for replication and overall genome-wide significance for one novel SSc genetic risk locus: CSK [P-value = 5.04 × 10(-12), odds ratio (OR) = 1.20]. Additionally, we found suggestive association in the loci PSD3 (P-value = 3.18 × 10(-7), OR = 1.36) and NFKB1 (P-value = 1.03 × 10(-6), OR = 1.14). Additionally, we strengthened the evidence for previously confirmed associations. This study significantly increases the number of known putative genetic risk factors for SSc, including the genes CSK, PSD3 and NFKB1, and further confirms six previously described ones.
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JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.