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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Genomic analyses of patients with unexplained early onset scoliosis.
Spine Deform
PUBLISHED: 11-18-2014
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To test for rare genetic mutations, a cohort of patients with unexplained early onset scoliosis (EOS) was screened using high-density microarray genotyping. A cohort of patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) was similarly screened, and the results were compared.
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ptk7 mutant zebrafish models of congenital and idiopathic scoliosis implicate dysregulated Wnt signalling in disease.
Nat Commun
PUBLISHED: 09-03-2014
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Scoliosis is a complex genetic disorder of the musculoskeletal system, characterized by three-dimensional rotation of the spine. Curvatures caused by malformed vertebrae (congenital scoliosis (CS)) are apparent at birth. Spinal curvatures with no underlying vertebral abnormality (idiopathic scoliosis (IS)) most commonly manifest during adolescence. The genetic and biological mechanisms responsible for IS remain poorly understood due largely to limited experimental models. Here we describe zygotic ptk7 (Zptk7) mutant zebrafish, deficient in a critical regulator of Wnt signalling, as the first genetically defined developmental model of IS. We identify a novel sequence variant within a single IS patient that disrupts PTK7 function, consistent with a role for dysregulated Wnt activity in disease pathogenesis. Furthermore, we demonstrate that embryonic loss-of-gene function in maternal-zygotic ptk7 mutants (MZptk7) leads to vertebral anomalies associated with CS. Our data suggest novel molecular origins of, and genetic links between, congenital and idiopathic forms of disease.
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Neurofibromin Deficiency-Associated Transcriptional Dysregulation Suggests a Novel Therapy for Tibial Pseudoarthrosis in NF1.
J. Bone Miner. Res.
PUBLISHED: 04-11-2014
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Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is an autosomal dominant disease caused by mutations in NF1. Among the earliest manifestations is tibial pseudoarthrosis and persistent nonunion after fracture. To further understand the pathogenesis of pseudoarthrosis and the underlying bone remodeling defect, pseudoarthrosis tissue and cells cultured from surgically resected pseudoarthrosis tissue from NF1 individuals were analyzed using whole-exome and whole-transcriptome sequencing as well as genomewide microarray analysis. Genomewide analysis identified multiple genetic mechanisms resulting in somatic bi-allelic NF1 inactivation; no other genes with recurring somatic mutations were identified. Gene expression profiling identified dysregulated pathways associated with neurofibromin deficiency, including phosphoinosital-3-kinase (PI3K) and mitogenactivated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways. Unlike aggressive NF1-associated malignancies, tibial pseudoarthrosis tissue does not harbor a high frequency of somatic mutations in oncogenes or other tumor-suppressor genes, such as p53. However, gene expression profiling indicates pseudoarthrosis tissue has a tumor-promoting transcriptional pattern, despite lacking tumorigenic somatic mutations. Significant overexpression of specific cancer-associated genes in pseudoarthrosis highlights a potential for receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors to target neurofibromin-deficient pseudoarthrosis and promote proper bone remodeling and fracture healing. © 2014 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.
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A meta-analysis identifies adolescent idiopathic scoliosis association with LBX1 locus in multiple ethnic groups.
J. Med. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 04-10-2014
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Adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) is a common rotational deformity of the spine that presents in children worldwide, yet its etiology is poorly understood. Recent genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified a few candidate risk loci. One locus near the chromosome 10q24.31 LBX1 gene (OMIM #604255) was originally identified by a GWAS of Japanese subjects and replicated in additional Asian populations. To extend this result, and to create larger AIS cohorts for the purpose of large-scale meta-analyses in multiple ethnicities, we formed a collaborative group called the International Consortium for Scoliosis Genetics (ICSG).
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A unique set of centrosome proteins requires pericentrin for spindle-pole localization and spindle orientation.
Curr. Biol.
PUBLISHED: 03-26-2014
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Majewski osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type II (MOPDII) is caused by mutations in the centrosome gene pericentrin (PCNT) that lead to severe pre- and postnatal growth retardation [1]. As in MOPDII patients, disruption of pericentrin (Pcnt) in mice caused a number of abnormalities including microcephaly, aberrant hemodynamics analyzed by in utero echocardiography, and cardiovascular anomalies; the latter being associated with mortality, as in the human condition [1]. To identify the mechanisms underlying these defects, we tested for changes in cell and molecular function. All Pcnt(-/-) mouse tissues and cells examined showed spindle misorientation. This mouse phenotype was associated with misdirected ventricular septal growth in the heart, decreased proliferative symmetric divisions in brain neural progenitors, and increased misoriented divisions in fibroblasts; the same phenotype was seen in fibroblasts from three MOPDII individuals. Misoriented spindles were associated with disrupted astral microtubules and near complete loss of a unique set of centrosome proteins from spindle poles (ninein, Cep215, centriolin). All these proteins appear to be crucial for microtubule anchoring and all interacted with Pcnt, suggesting that Pcnt serves as a molecular scaffold for this functionally linked set of spindle pole proteins. Importantly, Pcnt disruption had no detectable effect on localization of proteins involved in the cortical polarity pathway (NuMA, p150(glued), aPKC). Not only do these data reveal a spindle-pole-localized complex for spindle orientation, but they identify key spindle symmetry proteins involved in the pathogenesis of MOPDII.
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Genetic variants in GPR126 are associated with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis.
Nat. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 04-19-2013
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Adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) is the most common pediatric skeletal disease. We previously reported a locus on chromosome 10q24.31 associated with AIS susceptibility in Japanese using a genome-wide association study (GWAS) consisting of 1,033 cases and 1,473 controls. To identify additional AIS-associated loci, we expanded the study by adding X-chromosome SNPs in the GWAS and increasing the size of the replication cohorts. Through a stepwise association study including 1,819 cases and 25,939 controls, we identified a new susceptibility locus on chromosome 6q24.1 in Japanese (P = 2.25 × 10(-10); odds ratio (OR) = 1.28). The most significantly associated SNP, rs6570507, was in GPR126 (encoding G protein-coupled receptor 126). Its association was replicated in Han Chinese and European-ancestry populations (combined P = 1.27 × 10(-14); OR = 1.27). GPR126 was highly expressed in cartilage, and the knockdown of gpr126 in zebrafish caused delayed ossification of the developing spine. Our results should provide insights into the etiology and pathogenesis of AIS.
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Extreme Growth Failure is a Common Presentation of Ligase IV Deficiency.
Hum. Mutat.
PUBLISHED: 03-25-2013
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Ligase IV syndrome is a rare differential diagnosis for Nijmegen breakage syndrome owing to a shared predisposition to lympho-reticular malignancies, significant microcephaly, and radiation hypersensitivity. Only 16 cases with mutations in LIG4 have been described to date with phenotypes varying from malignancy in developmentally normal individuals, to severe combined immunodeficiency and early mortality. Here, we report the identification of biallelic truncating LIG4 mutations in 11 patients with microcephalic primordial dwarfism presenting with restricted prenatal growth and extreme postnatal global growth failure (average OFC -10.1 s.d., height -5.1 s.d.). Subsequently, most patients developed thrombocytopenia and leucopenia later in childhood and many were found to have previously unrecognized immunodeficiency following molecular diagnosis. None have yet developed malignancy, though all patients tested had cellular radiosensitivity. A genotype-phenotype correlation was also noted with position of truncating mutations corresponding to disease severity. This work extends the phenotypic spectrum associated with LIG4 mutations, establishing that extreme growth retardation with microcephaly is a common presentation of bilallelic truncating mutations. Such growth failure is therefore sufficient to consider a diagnosis of LIG4 deficiency and early recognition of such cases is important as bone marrow failure, immunodeficiency, and sometimes malignancy are long term sequelae of this disorder.
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A novel method for analyzing genetic association with longitudinal phenotypes.
Stat Appl Genet Mol Biol
PUBLISHED: 03-19-2013
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Knowledge of genes influencing longitudinal patterns may offer information about predicting disease progression. We developed a systematic procedure for testing association between SNP genotypes and longitudinal phenotypes. We evaluated false positive rates and statistical power to localize genes for disease progression. We used genome-wide SNP data from the Framingham Heart Study. With longitudinal data from two real studies unrelated to Framingham, we estimated three trajectory curves from each study. We performed simulations by randomly selecting 500 individuals. In each simulation replicate, we assigned each individual to one of the three trajectory groups based on the underlying hypothesis (null or alternative), and generated corresponding longitudinal data. Individual Bayesian posterior probabilities (BPPs) for belonging to a specific trajectory curve were estimated. These BPPs were treated as a quantitative trait and tested (using the Wald test) for genome-wide association. Empirical false positive rates and power were calculated. Our method maintained the expected false positive rate for all simulation models. Also, our method achieved high empirical power for most simulations. Our work presents a method for disease progression gene mapping. This method is potentially clinically significant as it may allow doctors to predict disease progression based on genotype and determine treatment accordingly.
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Identification of a homozygous PSTPIP1 mutation in a patient with a PAPA-like syndrome responding to canakinumab treatment.
JAMA Dermatol
PUBLISHED: 02-22-2013
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Pyogenic sterile arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum, and acne (PAPA) syndrome (OMIM 604416) is a rare autosomal dominant inherited autoinflammatory syndrome characterized by pyogenic sterile arthritis and less frequently accompanied by pyoderma gangrenosum and acne. It is associated with dominant missense mutations in the proline-serine-threonine phosphatase-interacting protein 1 gene (PSTPIP1) located on chromosome 15. The patient was diagnosed as having features of a PAPA-like syndrome in which cutaneous manifestations, such as pyoderma gangrenosum and acne fulminans, predominated.
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Susceptibility to childhood-onset rheumatoid arthritis: investigation of a weighted genetic risk score that integrates cumulative effects of variants at five genetic loci.
Arthritis Rheum.
PUBLISHED: 02-19-2013
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Children with childhood-onset rheumatoid arthritis (RA) include those with rheumatoid factor or anti-citrullinated protein antibody-positive juvenile idiopathic arthritis. To test the hypothesis that adult-onset RA-associated variants are also associated with childhood-onset RA, we investigated RA-associated variants at 5 loci in a cohort of patients with childhood-onset RA. We also assessed the cumulative association of these variants in susceptibility to childhood-onset RA using a weighted genetic risk score (wGRS).
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Mutations in the pre-replication complex cause Meier-Gorlin syndrome.
Nat. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 07-30-2011
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Meier-Gorlin syndrome (ear, patella and short-stature syndrome) is an autosomal recessive primordial dwarfism syndrome characterized by absent or hypoplastic patellae and markedly small ears¹?³. Both pre- and post-natal growth are impaired in this disorder, and although microcephaly is often evident, intellect is usually normal in this syndrome. We report here that individuals with this disorder show marked locus heterogeneity, and we identify mutations in five separate genes: ORC1, ORC4, ORC6, CDT1 and CDC6. All of these genes encode components of the pre-replication complex, implicating defects in replication licensing as the cause of a genetic syndrome with distinct developmental abnormalities.
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Association of TALS developmental disorder with defect in minor splicing component U4atac snRNA.
Science
PUBLISHED: 04-09-2011
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The spliceosome, a ribonucleoprotein complex that includes proteins and small nuclear RNAs (snRNAs), catalyzes RNA splicing through intron excision and exon ligation to produce mature messenger RNAs, which, in turn serve as templates for protein translation. We identified four point mutations in the U4atac snRNA component of the minor spliceosome in patients with brain and bone malformations and unexplained postnatal death [microcephalic osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type 1 (MOPD 1) or Taybi-Linder syndrome (TALS); Mendelian Inheritance in Man ID no. 210710]. Expression of a subgroup of genes, possibly linked to the disease phenotype, and minor intron splicing were affected in cell lines derived from TALS patients. Our findings demonstrate a crucial role of the minor spliceosome component U4atac snRNA in early human development and postnatal survival.
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Common polymorphisms in human lysyl oxidase genes are not associated with the adolescent idiopathic scoliosis phenotype.
BMC Med. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 03-14-2011
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Although adolescent idiopathic scoliosis affects approximately 3% of adolescents, the genetic contributions have proven difficult to identify. Work in model organisms, including zebrafish, chickens, and mice, has implicated the lysyl oxidase family of enzymes in the development of scoliosis. We hypothesized that common polymorphisms in the five human lysyl oxidase genes (LOX, LOXL1, LOXL2, LOXL3, and LOXL4) may be associated with the phenotype of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis.
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Mutations in ORC1, encoding the largest subunit of the origin recognition complex, cause microcephalic primordial dwarfism resembling Meier-Gorlin syndrome.
Nat. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 01-25-2011
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Studies into disorders of extreme growth failure (for example, Seckel syndrome and Majewski osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type II) have implicated fundamental cellular processes of DNA damage response signaling and centrosome function in the regulation of human growth. Here we report that mutations in ORC1, encoding a subunit of the origin recognition complex, cause microcephalic primordial dwarfism resembling Meier-Gorlin syndrome. We establish that these mutations disrupt known ORC1 functions including pre-replicative complex formation and origin activation. ORC1 deficiency perturbs S-phase entry and S-phase progression. Additionally, we show that Orc1 depletion in zebrafish is sufficient to markedly reduce body size during rapid embryonic growth. Our data suggest a model in which ORC1 mutations impair replication licensing, slowing cell cycle progression and consequently impeding growth during development, particularly at times of rapid proliferation. These findings establish a novel mechanism for the pathogenesis of microcephalic dwarfism and show a surprising but important developmental impact of impaired origin licensing.
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Genome-wide association studies of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis suggest candidate susceptibility genes.
Hum. Mol. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 01-07-2011
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Adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) is an unexplained and common spinal deformity seen in otherwise healthy children. Its pathophysiology is poorly understood despite intensive investigation. Although genetic underpinnings are clear, replicated susceptibility loci that could provide insight into etiology have not been forthcoming. To address these issues, we performed genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of ?327 000 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 419 AIS families. We found strongest evidence of association with chromosome 3p26.3 SNPs in the proximity of the CHL1 gene (P < 8 × 10(-8) for rs1400180). We genotyped additional chromosome 3p26.3 SNPs and tested replication in two follow-up case-control cohorts, obtaining strongest results when all three cohorts were combined (rs10510181 odds ratio = 1.49, 95% confidence interval = 1.29-1.73, P = 2.58 × 10(-8)), but these were not confirmed in a separate GWAS. CHL1 is of interest, as it encodes an axon guidance protein related to Robo3. Mutations in the Robo3 protein cause horizontal gaze palsy with progressive scoliosis (HGPPS), a rare disease marked by severe scoliosis. Other top associations in our GWAS were with SNPs in the DSCAM gene encoding an axon guidance protein in the same structural class with Chl1 and Robo3. We additionally found AIS associations with loci in CNTNAP2, supporting a previous study linking this gene with AIS. Cntnap2 is also of functional interest, as it interacts directly with L1 and Robo class proteins and participates in axon pathfinding. Our results suggest the relevance of axon guidance pathways in AIS susceptibility, although these findings require further study, particularly given the apparent genetic heterogeneity in this disease.
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Evaluation of GPR50, hMel-1B, and ROR-alpha melatonin-related receptors and the etiology of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis.
J Pediatr Orthop
PUBLISHED: 08-25-2010
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Adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) is the most common spinal deformity in children. Studies have shown low melatonin levels resulting from pinealectomy in chickens and mice result in the development scoliosis, whereas supplementation with melatonin after the pinealectomy prevented it. The mere characterization of low melatonin levels is not sufficient to explain the development of idiopathic scoliosis in primates and humans, but we hypothesize that a mutation in melatonin-related receptors may be involved with the development of scoliosis.
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Clinical, Molecular, and Genetic Characteristics of PAPA Syndrome: A Review.
Curr. Genomics
PUBLISHED: 06-22-2010
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PAPA syndrome (Pyogenic Arthritis, Pyoderma gangrenosum, and Acne) is an autosomal dominant, hereditary auto-inflammatory disease arising from mutations in the PSTPIP1/CD2BP1 gene on chromosome 15q. These mutations produce a hyper-phosphorylated PSTPIP1 protein and alter its participation in activation of the "inflammasome" involved in interleukin-1 (IL-1?) production. Overproduction of IL-1? is a clear molecular feature of PAPA syndrome. Ongoing research is implicating other biochemical pathways that may be relevant to the distinct pyogenic inflammation of the skin and joints characteristic of this disease. This review summarizes the recent and rapidly accumulating knowledge on these molecular aspects of PAPA syndrome and related disorders.
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Altered transmission of HOX and apoptotic SNPs identify a potential common pathway for clubfoot.
Am. J. Med. Genet. A
PUBLISHED: 11-26-2009
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Clubfoot is a common birth defect that affects 135,000 newborns each year worldwide. It is characterized by equinus deformity of one or both feet and hypoplastic calf muscles. Despite numerous study approaches, the cause(s) remains poorly understood although a multifactorial etiology is generally accepted. We considered the HOXA and HOXD gene clusters and insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3 (IGFBP3) as candidate genes because of their important roles in limb and muscle morphogenesis. Twenty SNPs from the HOXA and HOXD gene clusters and 12 SNPs in IGFBP3 were genotyped in a sample composed of non-Hispanic white and Hispanic multiplex and simplex families (discovery samples) and a second sample of non-Hispanic white simplex trios (validation sample). Four SNPs (rs6668, rs2428431, rs3801776, and rs3779456) in the HOXA cluster demonstrated altered transmission in the discovery sample, but only rs3801776, located in the HOXA basal promoter region, showed altered transmission in both the discovery and validation samples (P = 0.004 and 0.028). Interestingly, HOXA9 is expressed in muscle during development. An SNP in IGFBP3, rs13223993, also showed altered transmission (P = 0.003) in the discovery sample. Gene-gene interactions were identified between variants in HOXA, HOXD, and IGFBP3 and with previously associated SNPs in mitochondrial-mediated apoptotic genes. The most significant interactions were found between CASP3 SNPS and variants in HOXA, HOXD, and IGFBP3. These results suggest a biologic model for clubfoot in which perturbation of HOX and apoptotic genes together affect muscle and limb development, which may cause the downstream failure of limb rotation into a plantar grade position.
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Genome-wide scan reveals association of psoriasis with IL-23 and NF-kappaB pathways.
Nat. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 01-25-2009
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Psoriasis is a common immune-mediated disorder that affects the skin, nails and joints. To identify psoriasis susceptibility loci, we genotyped 438,670 SNPs in 1,409 psoriasis cases and 1,436 controls of European ancestry. We followed up 21 promising SNPs in 5,048 psoriasis cases and 5,041 controls. Our results provide strong support for the association of at least seven genetic loci and psoriasis (each with combined P < 5 x 10(-8)). Loci with confirmed association include HLA-C, three genes involved in IL-23 signaling (IL23A, IL23R, IL12B), two genes that act downstream of TNF-alpha and regulate NF-kappaB signaling (TNIP1, TNFAIP3) and two genes involved in the modulation of Th2 immune responses (IL4, IL13). Although the proteins encoded in these loci are known to interact biologically, we found no evidence for epistasis between associated SNPs. Our results expand the catalog of genetic loci implicated in psoriasis susceptibility and suggest priority targets for study in other auto-immune disorders.
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Somatic gain-of-function mutations in PIK3CA in patients with macrodactyly.
Hum. Mol. Genet.
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Macrodactyly is a discrete congenital anomaly consisting of enlargement of all tissues localized to the terminal portions of a limb, typically within a nerve territory. The classic terminology for this condition is lipofibromatous hamartoma of nerve or Type I macrodactyly. The peripheral nerve, itself, is enlarged both in circumference and in length. It is not related to neurofibromatosis (NF1), nor is it associated with vascular malformations, such as in the recently reported CLOVES syndrome. The specific nerve pathophysiology in this form of macrodactyly has not been well described and a genetic etiology for this specific form of enlargement is unknown. To identify the genetic cause of macrodactyly, we used whole-exome sequencing to identify somatic mutations present in the affected nerve of a single patient. We confirmed a novel mutation in PIK3CA (R115P) present in the patients affected nerve tissue but not in blood DNA. Sequencing PIK3CA exons identified gain-of-function mutations (E542K, H1047L or H1047R) in the affected tissue of five additional unrelated patients; mutations were absent in blood DNA available from three patients. Immunocytochemistry confirmed AKT activation in cultured cells from the nerve of a macrodactyly patient. Additionally, we found that the most abnormal structure within the involved nerve in a macrodactylous digit is the perineurium, with additional secondary effects on the axon number and size. Thus, isolated congenital macrodactyly is caused by somatic activation of the PI3K/AKT cell-signaling pathway and is genetically and biochemically related to other overgrowth syndromes.
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Meier-Gorlin syndrome: growth and secondary sexual development of a microcephalic primordial dwarfism disorder.
Am. J. Med. Genet. A
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Meier-Gorlin syndrome (MGS) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by primordial dwarfism, microtia, and patellar aplasia/hypoplasia. Recently, mutations in the ORC1, ORC4, ORC6, CDT1, and CDC6 genes, encoding components of the pre-replication complex, have been identified. This complex is essential for DNA replication and therefore mutations are expected to impair cell proliferation and consequently could globally reduce growth. However, detailed growth characteristics of MGS patients have not been reported, and so this is addressed here through study of 45 MGS patients, the largest cohort worldwide. Here, we report that growth velocity (length) is impaired in MGS during pregnancy and first year of life, but, thereafter, height increases in paralleled normal reference centiles, resulting in a mean adult height of -4.5 standard deviations (SD). Height is dependent on ethnic background and underlying molecular cause, with ORC1 and ORC4 mutations causing more severe short stature and microcephaly. Growth hormone therapy (n = 9) was generally ineffective, though in two patients with significantly reduced IGF1 levels, growth was substantially improved by GH treatment, with 2SD and 3.8 SD improvement in height. Growth parameters for monitoring growth in future MGS patients are provided and as well we highlight that growth is disproportionately affected in certain structures, with growth related minor genital abnormalities (42%) and mammary hypoplasia (100%) frequently present, in addition to established effects on ears and patellar growth.
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Growth in individuals with Majewski osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type II caused by pericentrin mutations.
Am. J. Med. Genet. A
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Microcephalic primordial dwarfism (MPD) is a class of disorders characterized by intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR), impaired postnatal growth and microcephaly. Majewski osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type II (MOPD II) is one of the more common conditions within this group. MOPD II is caused by truncating mutations in pericentrin (PCNT) and is inherited in an autosomal recessive manner. Detailed growth curves for length, weight, and OFC are presented here and derived from retrospective data from 26 individuals with MOPD II confirmed by molecular or functional studies. Severe pre- and postnatal growth failure is evident in MOPD II patients. The length, weight, and OFC at term (when corrected for gestational age) were -7.0, -3.9, and -4.6 standard deviation (SD) below the population mean and equivalent to the 50th centile of a 28-29-, 31-32-, and 30-31-week neonate, respectively. While at skeletal maturity, the height, weight, and OFC were -10.3, -14.3, and -8.5 SD below the population mean and equivalent to the size of 3-year 10- to 11-month-old, a 5-year 2- to 3-month-old, and 5- to 6-month-old, respectively. During childhood, MOPD II patients grow with slowed, but fairly constant growth velocities and show no evidence of any pubertal growth spurt. Treatment with human growth hormone (n = 11) did not lead to any significant improvement in final stature. The growth charts presented here will be of assistance with diagnosis and management of MOPD II, and should have particular utility in nutritional management of MOPD II during infancy.
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Rare and common variants in CARD14, encoding an epidermal regulator of NF-kappaB, in psoriasis.
Am. J. Hum. Genet.
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Psoriasis is a common inflammatory disorder of the skin and other organs. We have determined that mutations in CARD14, encoding a nuclear factor of kappa light chain enhancer in B cells (NF-kB) activator within skin epidermis, account for PSORS2. Here, we describe fifteen additional rare missense variants in CARD14, their distribution in seven psoriasis cohorts (>6,000 cases and >4,000 controls), and their effects on NF-kB activation and the transcriptome of keratinocytes. There were more CARD14 rare variants in cases than in controls (burden test p value = 0.0015). Some variants were only seen in a single case, and these included putative pathogenic mutations (c.424G>A [p.Glu142Lys] and c.425A>G [p.Glu142Gly]) and the generalized-pustular-psoriasis mutation, c.413A>C (p.Glu138Ala); these three mutations lie within the coiled-coil domain of CARD14. The c.349G>A (p.Gly117Ser) familial-psoriasis mutation was present at a frequency of 0.0005 in cases of European ancestry. CARD14 variants led to a range of NF-kB activities; in particular, putative pathogenic variants led to levels >2.5× higher than did wild-type CARD14. Two variants (c.511C>A [p.His171Asn] and c.536G>A [p.Arg179His]) required stimulation with tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-?) to achieve significant increases in NF-kB levels. Transcriptome profiling of wild-type and variant CARD14 transfectants in keratinocytes differentiated probably pathogenic mutations from neutral variants such as polymorphisms. Over 20 CARD14 polymorphisms were also genotyped, and meta-analysis revealed an association between psoriasis and rs11652075 (c.2458C>T [p.Arg820Trp]; p value = 2.1 × 10(-6)). In the two largest psoriasis cohorts, evidence for association increased when rs11652075 was conditioned on HLA-Cw*0602 (PSORS1). These studies contribute to our understanding of the genetic basis of psoriasis and illustrate the challenges faced in identifying pathogenic variants in common disease.
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Genome-wide association analysis of juvenile idiopathic arthritis identifies a new susceptibility locus at chromosomal region 3q13.
Arthritis Rheum.
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In a genome-wide association study of Caucasian patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), we have previously described findings limited to autoimmunity loci shared by JIA and other diseases. The present study was undertaken to identify novel JIA-predisposing loci using genome-wide approaches.
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Meier-Gorlin syndrome genotype-phenotype studies: 35 individuals with pre-replication complex gene mutations and 10 without molecular diagnosis.
Eur. J. Hum. Genet.
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Meier-Gorlin syndrome (MGS) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by microtia, patellar aplasia/hypoplasia, and short stature. Recently, mutations in five genes from the pre-replication complex (ORC1, ORC4, ORC6, CDT1, and CDC6), crucial in cell-cycle progression and growth, were identified in individuals with MGS. Here, we report on genotype-phenotype studies in 45 individuals with MGS (27 females, 18 males; age 3 months-47 years). Thirty-five individuals had biallelic mutations in one of the five causative pre-replication genes. No homozygous or compound heterozygous null mutations were detected. In 10 individuals, no definitive molecular diagnosis was made. The triad of microtia, absent/hypoplastic patellae, and short stature was observed in 82% of individuals with MGS. Additional frequent clinical features were mammary hypoplasia (100%) and abnormal genitalia (42%; predominantly cryptorchidism and hypoplastic labia minora/majora). One individual with ORC1 mutations only had short stature, emphasizing the highly variable clinical spectrum of MGS. Individuals with ORC1 mutations had significantly shorter stature and smaller head circumferences than individuals from other gene categories. Furthermore, compared with homozygous missense mutations, compound heterozygous mutations appeared to have a more severe effect on phenotype, causing more severe growth retardation in ORC4 and more frequently pulmonary emphysema in CDT1. A lethal phenotype was seen in four individuals with compound heterozygous ORC1 and CDT1 mutations. No other clear genotype-phenotype association was observed. Growth hormone and estrogen treatment may be of some benefit, respectively, to growth retardation and breast hypoplasia, though further studies in this patient group are needed.
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TDT-HET: a new transmission disequilibrium test that incorporates locus heterogeneity into the analysis of family-based association data.
BMC Bioinformatics
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Locus heterogeneity is one of the most documented phenomena in genetics. To date, relatively little work had been done on the development of methods to address locus heterogeneity in genetic association analysis. Motivated by Zhou and Pans work, we present a mixture model of linked and unlinked trios and develop a statistical method to estimate the probability that a heterozygous parent transmits the disease allele at a di-allelic locus, and the probability that any trio is in the linked group. The purpose here is the development of a test that extends the classic transmission disequilibrium test (TDT) to one that accounts for locus heterogeneity.
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JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.