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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Retinal nerve fibre layer thickness correlates with brain white matter damage in multiple sclerosis: A combined optical coherence tomography and diffusion tensor imaging study.
Mult. Scler.
PUBLISHED: 05-21-2014
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We investigated the association of retinal nerve fibre layer thickness (RNFL) with white matter damage assessed by diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Forty-four MS patients and 30 healthy subjects underwent optical coherence tomography. DTI was analysed with a voxel-based whole brain and region-based analysis of optic radiation, corpus callosum and further white matter. Correlations between RNFL, fractional anisotropy (FA) and other DTI-based parameters were assessed in patients and controls. RNFL correlated with optic radiation FA, but also with corpus callosum and remaining white matter FA. Our findings demonstrate that RNFL changes indicate white matter damage exceeding the visual pathway.
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Anti-NMDAR encephalitis mimicking HaNDL syndrome.
Cephalalgia
PUBLISHED: 03-11-2014
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Anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis typically manifests as severe multistage neuropsychiatric syndrome. However, milder or incomplete forms of the disorder have been recognised. Here, we report on a patient with anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis with a clinical phenotype mimicking the syndrome of headache with neurological deficits and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) lymphocytosis (HaNDL).
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The fraction of varicella zoster virus-specific antibodies among all intrathecally-produced antibodies discriminates between patients with varicella zoster virus reactivation and multiple sclerosis.
Fluids Barriers CNS
PUBLISHED: 02-08-2014
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Primary infection with or reactivation of varicella zoster virus (VZV) can cause neurologic complications, which typically result in an intrathecal production of VZV-specific antibodies. Intrathecal antibodies to VZV are detectable by an elevated antibody index (AI). However, elevated VZV AIs are also found in more than half of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), where they are thought to be part of a polyspecific intrathecal immune response. Determination of the fraction of intrathecally-produced virus-specific antibodies among all intrathecally produced antibodies may discriminate between virus-specific and polyspecific intrathecal immune responses, but the fraction of intrathecally-produced VZV-specific immunoglobulin (Ig)G of the total intrathecally produced IgG (FS anti-VZV) in patients with MS and VZV reactivation has hitherto not been compared.
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Neural correlates of short-term memory reorganization in humans with hippocampal damage.
J. Neurosci.
PUBLISHED: 07-05-2013
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Some patients with disorders affecting the hippocampus have relatively intact memory, but the mechanisms underlying this preservation of function are still debated. In particular, it is unclear whether preserved memory is attributable to significant residual function of unaffected hippocampus or to functional brain reorganization. Here, we investigated brain activation during an associative short-term memory task in two human patient groups matched for extent of postsurgical damage to the right hippocampal formation that differed in two key features, memory performance and preoperative disease course. Patients showed strikingly distinct activation patterns that correlated differentially with behavioral performance, strongly suggesting that intact associative short-term memory with hippocampal dysfunction is indeed related to compensatory brain reorganization. This process appears to depend both on activation of the contralesional hippocampus and on increased engagement of a distributed short-term memory network in neocortex. These data clarify the existence of an efficient hippocampal-neocortical mechanism that compensates for hippocampal dysfunction.
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Functional and structural brain changes in anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor encephalitis.
Ann. Neurol.
PUBLISHED: 04-24-2013
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Anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) encephalitis is an autoimmune encephalitis with a characteristic neuropsychiatric syndrome and severe and prolonged clinical courses. In contrast, standard clinical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) remains normal in the majority of patients. Here, we investigated structural and functional brain changes in a cohort of patients with anti-NMDAR encephalitis.
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Cognitive deficits following anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis.
J. Neurol. Neurosurg. Psychiatr.
PUBLISHED: 09-20-2011
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Anti-NMDA receptor (NMDAR) encephalitis is a recently characterised autoimmune disorder mainly affecting young women. Although the clinical features of the acute disease are well characterised, cognitive long-term outcome has not been examined in detail.
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Plasma viscosity in giant cell arteritis.
Eur. Neurol.
PUBLISHED: 02-16-2011
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Diagnosis of giant cell arteritis (GCA) is based on criteria of the American College of Rheumatology. However, not all GCA patients meet these criteria and treatment may be delayed in individual patients, leading to an increased risk of complications.
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Impaired representation of geometric relationships in humans with damage to the hippocampal formation.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 02-07-2011
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The pivotal role of the hippocampus for spatial memory is well-established. However, while neurophysiological and imaging studies suggest a specialization of the hippocampus for viewpoint-independent or allocentric memory, results from human lesion studies have been less conclusive. It is currently unclear whether disproportionate impairment in allocentric memory tasks reflects impairment of cognitive functions that are not sufficiently supported by regions outside the medial temporal lobe or whether the deficits observed in some studies are due to experimental factors. Here, we have investigated whether hippocampal contributions to spatial memory depend on the spatial references that are available in a certain behavioral context. Patients with medial temporal lobe lesions affecting systematically the right hippocampal formation performed a series of three oculomotor tasks that required memory of a spatial cue either in retinal coordinates or relative to a single environmental reference across a delay of 5000 ms. Stimulus displays varied the availability of spatial references and contained no complex visuo-spatial associations. Patients showed a selective impairment in a condition that critically depended on memory of the geometric relationship between spatial cue and environmental reference. We infer that regions of the medial temporal lobe, most likely the hippocampal formation, contribute to behavior in conditions that exceed the potential of viewpoint-dependent or egocentric representations. Apparently, this already applies to short-term memory of simple geometric relationships and does not necessarily depend on task difficulty or integration of landmarks into more complex representations. Deficient memory of basic geometric relationships may represent a core deficit that contributes to impaired performance in allocentric spatial memory tasks.
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Multiple system atrophy masking multiple sclerosis.
Clin Neurol Neurosurg
PUBLISHED: 04-26-2009
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Multiple system atrophy (MSA) and multiple sclerosis (MS) are progressive neurological disorders with overlapping clinical signs and symptoms. However, due to the course of the disease and the age of onset both disorders are rarely differential diagnosis for each other. We here report the remarkable association of the two diseases in one patient. As MSA dominated the clinical presentation, diagnosis and therapy of MS were delayed. We discuss the clinical symptoms in our patient and highlight the features that allow to differentiate both diseases.
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Dynamics of saccade parameters in multiple sclerosis patients with fatigue.
J. Neurol.
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Fatigue is one of the most frequent and disabling symptoms in multiple sclerosis (MS). Its pathophysiology remains poorly understood and objective measures to quantify fatigue are unavailable to date. To investigate whether analysis of ocular motor movements can provide diagnostic information in MS patients with fatigue, 37 MS patients (21 female, age 44 ± 9 years) and 20 age- and gender-matched healthy controls were prospectively recruited. Fatigue was assessed with the fatigue severity scale (FSS). Twenty-five MS patients were fatigued (defined as FSS ? 4) and 12 MS patients were not. Subjects performed a saccadic fatigue task that required execution of uniform saccades over a period of 10 min. Saccadic amplitude, latency and peak velocities during the task were analysed and selected parameters were tested in a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. Fatigued patients showed a significantly larger decrease of saccadic peak velocity and amplitude when compared to patients without fatigue and healthy controls. Furthermore, fatigued patients showed significantly longer latencies compared to non-fatigued patients and healthy controls. Peak velocity change over time and latencies correlated with FSS scores. The best parameter to discriminate between fatigued and non-fatigued patients was peak velocity change over time (ROC; area under the curve = 0.857). Assessment of peak velocity, amplitude and latency in a saccade fatigue task is a promising approach for quantifying fatigue in MS patients.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.