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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Food deprivation alters thermoregulatory responses to lipopolysaccharide by enhancing cryogenic inflammatory signaling via prostaglandin D2.
Am. J. Physiol. Regul. Integr. Comp. Physiol.
PUBLISHED: 04-14-2010
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We tested the hypothesis that food deprivation alters body temperature (T(b)) responses to bacterial LPS by enhancing inflammatory signaling that decreases T(b) (cryogenic signaling) rather than by suppressing inflammatory signaling that increases T(b) (febrigenic signaling). Free-feeding or food-deprived (24 h) rats received LPS at doses (500 and 2,500 microg/kg iv) that are high enough to activate both febrigenic and cryogenic signaling. At these doses, LPS caused fever in rats at an ambient temperature of 30 degrees C, but produced hypothermia at an ambient temperature of 22 degrees C. Whereas food deprivation had little effect on LPS fever, it enhanced LPS hypothermia, an effect that was particularly pronounced in rats injected with the higher LPS dose. Enhancement of hypothermia was not due to thermogenic incapacity, since food-deprived rats were fully capable of raising T(b) in response to the thermogenic drug CL316,243 (1 mg/kg iv). Neither was enhancement of hypothermia associated with altered plasma levels of cytokines (TNF-alpha, IL-1beta, and IL-6) or with reduced levels of an anti-inflammatory hormone (corticosterone). The levels of PGD(2) and PGE(2) during LPS hypothermia were augmented by food deprivation, although the ratio between them remained unchanged. Food deprivation, however, selectively enhanced the responsiveness of rats to the cryogenic action of PGD(2) (100 ng icv) without altering the responsiveness to febrigenic PGE(2) (100 ng icv). These findings support our hypothesis and indicate that cryogenic signaling via PGD(2) underlies enhancement of LPS hypothermia by food deprivation.
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A reappraisal on the ability of leptin to induce fever.
Physiol. Behav.
PUBLISHED: 01-23-2009
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Leptin is often regarded as a mediator of fever, even though an in-depth analysis of the dose-dependent effects of leptin on body temperature (T(b)), pro-inflammatory cytokines, and circulating leptin has never been performed. In the present study, such an analysis was performed in rats that were food deprived (lower baseline levels of leptin) or free feeding (higher baseline levels of leptin). In a relatively cool environment (22 degrees C), rats deprived of food for 24 h exhibited mild (approximately 0.5 degrees C) hypothermia. Leptin infusion (250 microg/kg iv) elevated the T(b) of the food-deprived rats to a normothermic level, an effect that peaked (120 min post-infusion) when plasma leptin was at a level (approximately 8 ng/mL) often found in leptin-responsive subjects. Increasing the leptin dose to 1000 microg/kg did not produce any further (febrile) elevation in the T(b) of food-deprived rats. The anti-hypothermic effect of leptin in food-deprived rats was not associated with any rise in the plasma levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha and interleukin (IL)-6. In free-feeding rats kept in a cooler (22 degrees C) or warmer (28 degrees C) environment, leptin infusion failed to alter T(b) or to produce any surge in plasma TNF-alpha or IL-6, even when the dose infused (3500 microg/kg iv) resulted in excessive, non-physiological rises in plasma leptin (approximately 542 ng/mL at 30 min; approximately 75 ng/mL at 120 min post-infusion). In contrast, free-feeding rats in the same experimental set-up were able to respond to a low dose (2 microg/kg iv) of IL-1beta with a typical biphasic fever, which was associated with surges in plasma TNF-alpha and IL-6. Collectively, our data show that an acute rise in plasma leptin to a level within or fairly above the physiological range does not induce fever. These results challenge the idea that leptin may be a mediator of fever.
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Naturally occurring hypothermia is more advantageous than fever in severe forms of lipopolysaccharide- and Escherichia coli-induced systemic inflammation.
Am. J. Physiol. Regul. Integr. Comp. Physiol.
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The natural switch from fever to hypothermia observed in the most severe cases of systemic inflammation is a phenomenon that continues to puzzle clinicians and scientists. The present study was the first to evaluate in direct experiments how the development of hypothermia vs. fever during severe forms of systemic inflammation impacts the pathophysiology of this malady and mortality rates in rats. Following administration of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 5 or 18 mg/kg) or of a clinical Escherichia coli isolate (5 × 10(9) or 1 × 10(10) CFU/kg), hypothermia developed in rats exposed to a mildly cool environment, but not in rats exposed to a warm environment; only fever was revealed in the warm environment. Development of hypothermia instead of fever suppressed endotoxemia in E. coli-infected rats, but not in LPS-injected rats. The infiltration of the lungs by neutrophils was similarly suppressed in E. coli-infected rats of the hypothermic group. These potentially beneficial effects came with costs, as hypothermia increased bacterial burden in the liver. Furthermore, the hypotensive responses to LPS or E. coli were exaggerated in rats of the hypothermic group. This exaggeration, however, occurred independently of changes in inflammatory cytokines and prostaglandins. Despite possible costs, development of hypothermia lessened abdominal organ dysfunction and reduced overall mortality rates in both the E. coli and LPS models. By demonstrating that naturally occurring hypothermia is more advantageous than fever in severe forms of aseptic (LPS-induced) or septic (E. coli-induced) systemic inflammation, this study provides new grounds for the management of this deadly condition.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.