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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
HIV Stigma as a Barrier to Retention in HIV Care at a General Hospital in Lima, Peru: A Case-Control Study.
AIDS Behav
PUBLISHED: 10-02-2014
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HIV stigma as a barrier to retention in HIV care has not been well-studied outside the United States. We conducted a case-control study in Lima, Peru to examine this issue. Cases were out-of-care for ?12 months (n = 66) and controls were recruited from patients in active care presenting for a clinic visit (n = 110). A previously validated HIV stigma scale with four domains was used. Associations between being out-of-care and each stigma domain were assessed using multivariable logistic regression. Stigma scores were highest for disclosure concerns. Modest associations were found for greater disclosure concerns (OR 1.16; 95 % CI 0.99, 1.36) and concerns with public attitudes (OR 1.20; 95 % CI 1.03, 1.40). Enacted stigma and negative self-image showed non-linear associations with being out-of-care that plateaued or declined, respectively, at higher levels of stigma. The threshold effect for enacted stigma warrants further exploration, while disclosure concerns may be especially amenable to intervention in this population.
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Clinical management of concurrent diabetes and tuberculosis and the implications for patient services.
Lancet Diabetes Endocrinol
PUBLISHED: 09-08-2014
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Diabetes triples the risk for active tuberculosis, thus the increasing burden of type 2 diabetes will help to sustain the present tuberculosis epidemic. Recommendations have been made for bidirectional screening, but evidence is scarce about the performance of specific tuberculosis tests in individuals with diabetes, specific diabetes tests in patients with tuberculosis, and screening and preventive therapy for latent tuberculosis infections in individuals with diabetes. Clinical management of patients with both diseases can be difficult. Tuberculosis patients with diabetes have a lower concentration of tuberculosis drugs and a higher risk of drug toxicity than tuberculosis patients without diabetes. Good glycaemic control, which reduces long-term diabetes complications and could also improve tuberculosis treatment outcomes, is hampered by chronic inflammation, drug-drug interactions, suboptimum adherence to drug treatments, and other factors. Besides drug treatments for tuberculosis and diabetes, other interventions, such as education, intensive monitoring, and lifestyle interventions, might be needed, especially for patients with newly diagnosed diabetes or those who need insulin. From a health systems point of view, delivery of optimum care and integration of services for tuberculosis and diabetes is a huge challenge in many countries. Experience from the combined tuberculosis and HIV/AIDS epidemic could serve as an example, but more studies are needed that include economic assessments of recommended screening and systems to manage concurrent tuberculosis and diabetes.
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[Tuberculosis and diabetes co-morbidity: an unresolved problem].
Rev Peru Med Exp Salud Publica
PUBLISHED: 02-12-2014
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Co-morbidity between tuberculosis and diabetes has been described since the early 20th century. In developed countries, where there has been a decrease of infectious diseases with an increase of non-communicable diseases, as well as those countries who still have a high prevalence of infectious diseases but an increase of non-communicable diseases, it is observed that the prevalence of co-morbidity between tuberculosis and diabetes is increasing, making clinical management and control at the public health level a new challenge for health systems. This review aims to show the current available evidence that can inform research lines being developed to understand the problem. In countries like Peru, where there is an epidemiological transition, further research could allow us to understand and describe in a better way the characteristics and impact of this co-morbidity.
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[Knowledge, attitudes, and practices about Carrións disease in rural Ancash, Peru].
Rev. Panam. Salud Publica
PUBLISHED: 06-15-2013
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To assess knowledge, attitudes, and practices about Carrións disease (bartonellosis) in rural communities with a history of epidemic outbreaks.
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Knowledge about HIV prevention and transmission among recently diagnosed tuberculosis patients: a cross sectional study.
BMC Public Health
PUBLISHED: 04-19-2013
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Patients with Tuberculosis (TB) are a vulnerable group for acquiring HIV infection. Therefore, countries with a concentrated HIV epidemic and high prevalence of TB should provide adequate information about HIV prevention to TB patients.
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Private sector contributions and their effect on physician emigration in the developing world.
Bull. World Health Organ.
PUBLISHED: 01-17-2013
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The contribution made by the private sector to health care in a low- or middle-income country may affect levels of physician emigration from that country. The increasing importance of the private sector in health care in the developing world has resulted in newfound academic interest in that sectors influences on many aspects of national health systems. The growth in physician emigration from the developing world has led to several attempts to identify both the factors that cause physicians to emigrate and the effects of physician emigration on primary care and population health in the countries that the physicians leave. When the relevant data on the emerging economies of Ghana, India and Peru were investigated, it appeared that the proportion of physicians participating in private health-care delivery, the percentage of health-care costs financed publicly and the amount of private health-care financing per capita were each inversely related to the level of physician expatriation. It therefore appears that private health-care delivery and financing may decrease physician emigration. There is clearly a need for similar research in other low- and middle-income countries, and for studies to see if, at the country level, temporal trends in the contribution made to health care by the private sector can be related to the corresponding trends in physician emigration. The ways in which private health care may be associated with access problems for the poor and therefore reduced equity also merit further investigation. The results should be of interest to policy-makers who aim to improve health systems worldwide.
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Association of major depressive episode with negative outcomes of tuberculosis treatment.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
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Pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) persists an important contributor to the burden of diseases in developing countries. TB control success is based on the patients compliance to the treatment. Depressive disorders have been negatively associated with compliance of therapeutic schemes for chronic diseases. This study aimed to estimate the significance and magnitude of major depressive episode as a hazard factor for negative outcomes (NO), including abandon or death in patients receiving TB treatment.
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Induced sputum MMP-1, -3 & -8 concentrations during treatment of tuberculosis.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
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Tuberculosis (TB) destroys lung tissues and this immunopathology is mediated in part by Matrix Metalloproteinases (MMPs). There are no data on the relationship between local tissue MMPs concentrations, anti-tuberculosis therapy and sputum conversion.
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MMP-1 drives immunopathology in human tuberculosis and transgenic mice.
J. Clin. Invest.
PUBLISHED: 02-09-2011
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Mycobacterium tuberculosis can cause lung tissue damage to spread, but the mechanisms driving this immunopathology are poorly understood. The breakdown of lung matrix involves MMPs, which have a unique ability to degrade fibrillar collagens at neutral pH. To determine whether MMPs play a role in the immunopathology of tuberculosis (TB), we profiled MMPs and their inhibitors, the tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases (TIMPs), in sputum and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from patients with TB and symptomatic controls. MMP-1 concentrations were significantly increased in both HIV-negative and HIV-positive patients with TB, while TIMP concentrations were lower in HIV-negative TB patients. In primary human monocytes, M. tuberculosis infection selectively upregulated MMP1 gene expression and secretion, and Ro32-3555, a specific MMP inhibitor, suppressed M. tuberculosis-driven MMP-1 activity. Since the mouse MMP-1 ortholog is not expressed in the lung and mice infected with M. tuberculosis do not develop tissue destruction equivalent to humans, we infected transgenic mice expressing human MMP-1 with M. tuberculosis to investigate whether MMP-1 caused lung immunopathology. In the MMP-1 transgenic mice, M. tuberculosis infection increased MMP-1 expression, resulting in alveolar destruction in lung granulomas and significantly greater collagen breakdown. In summary, MMP-1 may drive tissue destruction in TB and represents a therapeutic target to limit immunopathology.
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Bartonella bacilliformis: a systematic review of the literature to guide the research agenda for elimination.
PLoS Negl Trop Dis
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Carrions disease affects small Andean communities in Peru, Colombia and Ecuador and is characterized by two distinct disease manifestations: an abrupt acute bacteraemic illness (Oroya fever) and an indolent cutaneous eruptive condition (verruga Peruana). Case fatality rates of untreated acute disease can exceed 80% during outbreaks. Despite being an ancient disease that has affected populations since pre-Inca times, research in this area has been limited and diagnostic and treatment guidelines are based on very low evidence reports. The apparently limited geographical distribution and ecology of Bartonella bacilliformis may present an opportunity for disease elimination if a clear understanding of the epidemiology and optimal case and outbreak management can be gained.
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Additional evidence to support the phasing-out of treatment category II regimen for pulmonary tuberculosis in Peru.
Trans. R. Soc. Trop. Med. Hyg.
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The effectiveness of the World Health Organizations (WHO) treatment category II regimen for tuberculosis in 124 patients was compared to that of 1147 patients receiving treatment category I in Lima, Peru following WHOs guidelines. Drug susceptibility test was available for 85% of patients. Prevalence of multi drug resistance and streptomycin resistance were 5.1% and 20.7%, respectively. Overall cure rate for regimen II was lower than that of regimen I: 67.8% (95% CI: 58.9-75.6.) vs 77.8% (95% CI: 75.3-80.2), p=0.014. Multi-drug resistance exerted a profound effect on cure rates in both regimens. Our results support the phasing-out of treatment category II regimen in Peru.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.