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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Malaria and other vector-borne infection surveillance in the U.S. Department of Defense Armed Forces Health Surveillance Center-Global Emerging Infections Surveillance program: review of 2009 accomplishments.
BMC Public Health
PUBLISHED: 03-04-2011
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Vector-borne infections (VBI) are defined as infectious diseases transmitted by the bite or mechanical transfer of arthropod vectors. They constitute a significant proportion of the global infectious disease burden. United States (U.S.) Department of Defense (DoD) personnel are especially vulnerable to VBIs due to occupational contact with arthropod vectors, immunological naiveté to previously unencountered pathogens, and limited diagnostic and treatment options available in the austere and unstable environments sometimes associated with military operations. In addition to the risk uniquely encountered by military populations, other factors have driven the worldwide emergence of VBIs. Unprecedented levels of global travel, tourism and trade, and blurred lines of demarcation between zoonotic VBI reservoirs and human populations increase vector exposure. Urban growth in previously undeveloped regions and perturbations in global weather patterns also contribute to the rise of VBIs. The Armed Forces Health Surveillance Center-Global Emerging Infections Surveillance and Response System (AFHSC-GEIS) and its partners at DoD overseas laboratories form a network to better characterize the nature, emergence and growth of VBIs globally. In 2009 the network tested 19,730 specimens from 25 sites for Plasmodium species and malaria drug resistance phenotypes and nearly another 10,000 samples to determine the etiologies of non-Plasmodium species VBIs from regions spanning from Oceania to Africa, South America, and northeast, south and Southeast Asia. This review describes recent VBI-related epidemiological studies conducted by AFHSC-GEIS partner laboratories within the OCONUS DoD laboratory network emphasizing their impact on human populations.
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A growing global networks role in outbreak response: AFHSC-GEIS 2008-2009.
BMC Public Health
PUBLISHED: 03-04-2011
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A cornerstone of effective disease surveillance programs comprises the early identification of infectious threats and the subsequent rapid response to prevent further spread. Effectively identifying, tracking and responding to these threats is often difficult and requires international cooperation due to the rapidity with which diseases cross national borders and spread throughout the global community as a result of travel and migration by humans and animals. From Oct.1, 2008 to Sept. 30, 2009, the United States Department of Defenses (DoD) Armed Forces Health Surveillance Center Global Emerging Infections Surveillance and Response System (AFHSC-GEIS) identified 76 outbreaks in 53 countries. Emerging infectious disease outbreaks were identified by the global network and included a wide spectrum of support activities in collaboration with host country partners, several of which were in direct support of the World Health Organizations (WHO) International Health Regulations (IHR) (2005). The network also supported military forces around the world affected by the novel influenza A/H1N1 pandemic of 2009. With IHR (2005) as the guiding framework for action, the AFHSC-GEIS network of international partners and overseas research laboratories continues to develop into a far-reaching system for identifying, analyzing and responding to emerging disease threats.
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Chiral discrimination among aminotransferases: inactivation by 4-amino-4,5-dihydrothiophenecarboxylic acid.
Biochemistry
PUBLISHED: 03-03-2010
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Mechanism-based inhibitors such as cycloserine and gabaculine can inactivate aminotransferases via reactions of the compounds with the pyridoxal phosphate cofactor forming an irreversible adduct. The reaction is chirally specific in that any one enzyme usually only recognizes one enantiomer of the inactivator. For instance, l-aspartate aminotransferase (l-AspAT) is inactivated by 4-amino-4,5-dihydro-2-thiophenecarboxylic acid (ADTA), however, only by the S-isomer. We have now shown that d-amino acid aminotransferase (d-a-AT) is irreversibly inactivated by the R-isomer of the same compound. The X-ray crystal structure (PDB code: 3LQS ) of the inactivated enzyme shows that in the product the enzyme no longer makes a Schiff base linkage to the pyridoxal 5-phosphate (PLP) cofactor, and instead the compound has formed a derivative of the cofactor. The adduct is similar to that formed between d-cycloserine and d-a-AT or alanine racemase (Ala-Rac) in that the thiophene ring of R-ADTA is intact and seems to be aromatic. The plane of the ring is rotated by nearly 90 degrees with respect to the plane of the pyridine ring of the cofactor, in comparison with the enzyme inactivated by cycloserine. Based on the structure of the product, the mechanism of inactivation most probably involves a transamination followed by aromatization to form an aromatic thiophene ring.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.