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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Insulin Treatment Modulates the Host Immune System To Enhance Pseudomonas aeruginosa Wound Biofilms.
Infect. Immun.
PUBLISHED: 10-14-2013
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Diabetes affects 25.8 million people in the United States, or 8.3% of the population, and these numbers are even higher in developing countries. Diabetic patients are more susceptible to the development of chronic wounds with debilitating bacterial infections than nondiabetics. Previously, we compared the ability of the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa to cause biofilm-associated infections in chronic wounds of diabetic and nondiabetic mice (C. Watters, K. DeLeon, U. Trivedi, J. A. Griswold, M. Lyte, K. J. Hampel, M. J. Wargo, and K. P. Rumbaugh, Med. Microbiol. Immunol. 202:131-141, 2013). Unexpectedly, we observed that insulin-treated diabetic mice had significantly more biofilm in their wounds, which correlated with higher antibiotic tolerance. Here, we investigated whether insulin treatment modulates the diabetic immune system to favor P. aeruginosa biofilm formation. Utilizing a murine chronic wound model, we found that DNA protected P. aeruginosa in the wounds of insulin-treated diabetic mice from antibiotic treatment. We also observed increased numbers of neutrophils, reduced numbers of macrophages, and increased cell death in the wounds of diabetic mice on insulin therapy. Taken together, these data suggest that high levels of lysed neutrophils in the wounds of diabetic mice on insulin, combined with fewer macrophages to remove the cellular debris, contribute to increased DNA levels, which enhance P. aeruginosa biofilms.
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An in vivo polymicrobial biofilm wound infection model to study interspecies interactions.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 05-12-2011
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Chronic wound infections are typically polymicrobial; however, most in vivo studies have focused on monospecies infections. This project was designed to develop an in vivo, polymicrobial, biofilm-related, infected wound model in order to study multispecies biofilm dynamics and in relation to wound chronicity. Multispecies biofilms consisting of both Gram negative and Gram positive strains, as well as aerobes and anaerobes, were grown in vitro and then transplanted onto the wounds of mice. These in vitro-to-in vivo multi-species biofilm transplants generated polymicrobial wound infections, which remained heterogeneous with four bacterial species throughout the experiment. We observed that wounded mice given multispecies biofilm infections displayed a wound healing impairment over mice infected with a single-species of bacteria. In addition, the bacteria in the polymicrobial wound infections displayed increased antimicrobial tolerance in comparison to those in single species infections. These data suggest that synergistic interactions between different bacterial species in wounds may contribute to healing delays and/or antibiotic tolerance.
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Human transcriptome analysis reveals a potential role for active transport in the metabolism of Pseudomonas aeruginosa autoinducers.
Microbes Infect.
PUBLISHED: 03-18-2010
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The opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa employs acyl homoserine lactones (AHL) as signaling compounds to regulate virulence gene expression via quorum sensing. The AHL N-3-oxo-dodecanoyl-l-homoserine lactone (3OC(12)-HSL) also induces mammalian cell responses, including apoptosis and immune modulation. In certain cell types the apoptotic effects of 3OC(12)-HSL are mediated via a calcium-dependent signaling pathway, while some pro-inflammatory effects involve intracellular transcriptional regulators. However, the mechanisms by which mammalian cells perceive and respond to 3OC(12)-HSL are still not completely understood. Here we used microarray analysis to investigate the transcriptional response of human lung epithelial cells after exposure to 3OC(12)-HSL. These data revealed that mRNA levels for several genes involved in xenobiotic sensing and drug transport were increased in cells exposed to 3OC(12)-HSL, which led us to examine the intracellular fate of 3OC(12)-HSL. Using radiolabeled autoinducer uptake assays, we discovered that intracellular 3OC(12)-HSL levels increased after exposure and achieved maximal levels after 20-30 min. Intracellular 3OC(12)-HSL decreased to background levels over the next 90 min and this process was blocked by pre-treatment with an inhibitor of the ABC transporter ABCA1. Taken together, these data suggest that mammalian cells detect 3OC(12)-HSL and activate protective mechanisms to expel it from the cell.
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Gallium maltolate treatment eradicates Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection in thermally injured mice.
Antimicrob. Agents Chemother.
PUBLISHED: 02-02-2009
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Gallium (Ga) is a semimetallic element that has demonstrated therapeutic and diagnostic-imaging potential in a number of disease settings, including cancer and infectious diseases. Galliums biological actions stem from its ionic radius being almost the same as that of ferric iron (Fe(3+)), whereby it can replace iron (Fe) in Fe(3+)-dependent biological systems, such as bacterial and mammalian Fe transporters and Fe(3+)-containing enzymes. Unlike Fe(3+), ionic gallium (Ga(3+)) cannot be reduced, and when incorporated, it inactivates Fe(3+)-dependent reduction and oxidation processes that are necessary for bacterial and mammalian cell proliferation. Most pathogenic bacteria require Fe for growth and function, and the availability of Fe in the host or environment can greatly enhance virulence. We examined whether gallium maltolate (GaM), a novel formulation of Ga, had antibacterial activity in a thermally injured acute infection mouse model. Dose-response studies indicated that a GaM dose as low as 25 mg/kg of body weight delivered subcutaneously was sufficient to provide 100% survival in a lethal P. aeruginosa-infected thermally injured mouse model. Mice treated with 100 mg/kg GaM had undetectable levels of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in their wounds, livers, and spleens, while the wounds of untreated mice were colonized with over 10(8) P. aeruginosa CFU/g of tissue and their livers and spleens were colonized with over 10(5) P. aeruginosa CFU/g of tissue. GaM also significantly reduced the colonization of Staphylococcus aureus and Acinetobacter baumannii in the wounds of thermally injured mice. Furthermore, GaM was also therapeutically effective in preventing preestablished P. aeruginosa infections at the site of the injury from spreading systemically. Taken together, our data suggest that GaM is potentially a novel antibacterial agent for the prevention and treatment of wound infections following thermal injury.
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Quorum sensing and the social evolution of bacterial virulence.
Curr. Biol.
PUBLISHED: 01-08-2009
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The ability of pathogenic bacteria to exploit their hosts depends upon various virulence factors, released in response to the concentration of small autoinducer molecules that are also released by the bacteria [1-5]. In vitro experiments suggest that autoinducer molecules are signals used to coordinate cooperative behaviors and that this process of quorum sensing (QS) can be exploited by individual cells that avoid the cost of either producing or responding to signal [6, 7]. However, whether QS is an exploitable social trait in vivo, and the implications for the evolution of virulence [5, 8-10], remains untested. We show that in mixed infections of the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa, containing quorum-sensing bacteria and mutants that do not respond to signal, virulence in an animal (mouse) model is reduced relative to that of an infection containing no mutants. We show that this is because mutants act as cheats, exploiting the cooperative production of signal and virulence factors by others, and hence increase in frequency. This supports the idea that the invasion of QS mutants in infections of humans [11-13] is due to their social fitness consequences [6, 7, 14] and predicts that increased strain diversity will select for lower virulence.
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Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms perturb wound resolution and antibiotic tolerance in diabetic mice.
Med. Microbiol. Immunol.
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Diabetic patients are more susceptible to the development of chronic wounds than non-diabetics. The impaired healing properties of these wounds, which often develop debilitating bacterial infections, significantly increase the rate of lower extremity amputation in diabetic patients. We hypothesize that bacterial biofilms, or sessile communities of bacteria that reside in a complex matrix of exopolymeric material, contribute to the severity of diabetic wounds. To test this hypothesis, we developed an in vivo chronic wound, diabetic mouse model to determine the ability of the opportunistic pathogen, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, to cause biofilm-associated infections. Utilizing this model, we observed that diabetic mice with P. aeruginosa-infected chronic wounds displayed impaired bacterial clearing and wound closure in comparison with their non-diabetic littermates. While treating diabetic mice with insulin improved their overall health, it did not restore their ability to resolve P. aeruginosa wound infections or speed healing. In fact, the prevalence of biofilms and the tolerance of P. aeruginosa to gentamicin treatment increased when diabetic mice were treated with insulin. Insulin treatment was observed to directly affect the ability of P. aeruginosa to form biofilms in vitro. These data demonstrate that the chronically wounded diabetic mouse appears to be a useful model to study wound healing and biofilm infection dynamics, and suggest that the diabetic wound environment may promote the formation of biofilms. Further, this model provides for the elucidation of mechanistic factors, such as the ability of insulin to influence antimicrobial effectiveness, which may be relevant to the formation of biofilms in diabetic wounds.
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A novel virulence strategy for Pseudomonas aeruginosa mediated by an autotransporter with arginine-specific aminopeptidase activity.
PLoS Pathog.
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The opportunistic human pathogen, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, is a major cause of infections in chronic wounds, burns and the lungs of cystic fibrosis patients. The P. aeruginosa genome encodes at least three proteins exhibiting the characteristic three domain structure of autotransporters, but much remains to be understood about the functions of these three proteins and their role in pathogenicity. Autotransporters are the largest family of secreted proteins in Gram-negative bacteria, and those characterised are virulence factors. Here, we demonstrate that the PA0328 autotransporter is a cell-surface tethered, arginine-specific aminopeptidase, and have defined its active site by site directed mutagenesis. Hence, we have assigned PA0328 with the name AaaA, for arginine-specific autotransporter of P. aeruginosa. We show that AaaA provides a fitness advantage in environments where the sole source of nitrogen is peptides with an aminoterminal arginine, and that this could be important for establishing an infection, as the lack of AaaA led to attenuation in a mouse chronic wound infection which correlated with lower levels of the cytokines TNF?, IL-1?, KC and COX-2. Consequently AaaA is an important virulence factor playing a significant role in the successful establishment of P. aeruginosa infections.
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Kin selection, quorum sensing and virulence in pathogenic bacteria.
Proc. Biol. Sci.
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Bacterial growth and virulence often depends upon the cooperative release of extracellular factors excreted in response to quorum sensing (QS). We carried out an in vivo selection experiment in mice to examine how QS evolves in response to variation in relatedness (strain diversity), and the consequences for virulence. We started our experiment with two bacterial strains: a wild-type that both produces and responds to QS signal molecules, and a lasR (signal-blind) mutant that does not release extracellular factors in response to signal. We found that: (i) QS leads to greater growth within hosts; (ii) high relatedness favours the QS wild-type; and (iii) low relatedness favours the lasR mutant. Relatedness matters in our experiment because, at relatively low relatedness, the lasR mutant is able to exploit the extracellular factors produced by the cells that respond to QS, and hence increase in frequency. Furthermore, our results suggest that because a higher relatedness favours cooperative QS, and hence leads to higher growth, this will also lead to a higher virulence, giving a relationship between relatedness and virulence that is in the opposite direction to that usually predicted by virulence theory.
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JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.