JoVE Visualize What is visualize?
Stop Reading. Start Watching.
Advanced Search
Stop Reading. Start Watching.
Regular Search
Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
The impact of melancholia versus non-melancholia on resting-state, EEG alpha asymmetry: electrophysiological evidence for depression heterogeneity.
Psychiatry Res
PUBLISHED: 01-09-2014
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
While depression has been associated with relatively greater right than left frontal cortical activity - a neurophysiological marker reflecting greater activation of the withdrawal system - contradictory findings have been reported. It was hypothesised that melancholia would be associated with relative right frontal activation, in comparison to non-melancholia and controls. We collected 2-min of resting-state, eyes closed, electroencephalographic activity from a total of 237 participants including 117 patients with major depressive disorder (57 with melancholia, 60 with non-melancholia) and 120 healthy controls. In contrast to hypotheses, patients with non-melancholia displayed relative left frontal activation in comparison to controls and those with melancholia. These findings were associated with a small to moderate effect size (Cohen's d=0.30-0.34). Critically, patients with melancholic subtype did not differ from controls despite increased severity - relative to those with non-melancholia - on clinical measures. These results may reflect an increase in approach tendencies in patients with non-melancholia including reassurance seeking, anger or irritable aggression. Findings highlight the need for further research on the heterogeneity MDD.
Related JoVE Video
Eye tracking and physiological reactivity to threatening stimuli in posttraumatic stress disorder.
J Anxiety Disord
PUBLISHED: 02-23-2011
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
This study tested the vigilance-avoidance model of anxiety and attention bias in posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). This study used eye tracking technology to record initial fixations, pupil dilation, fixation time and concurrent skin conductance response to examine initial orienting towards threat stimuli and subsequent fixations. Twenty-one traumatized participants (11 diagnosed with PTSD and 10 trauma-exposed participants without PTSD) viewed 32 stimuli (with four words in each quadrant). Sixteen trials contained a trauma-relevant word in one quadrant and 16 had four neutral words. PTSD patients reported significantly greater number of initial fixations to trauma words, and a greater number of skin conductance responses to initial threat fixations. There were no significant differences in subsequent fixations to trauma words between groups. Although this study provides evidence of attentional bias towards threat that is accompanied by specific autonomic arousal, it does not indicate subsequent avoidance of threat stimuli in PTSD.
Related JoVE Video
Anterior cingulate activity to salient stimuli is modulated by autonomic arousal in posttraumatic stress disorder.
Psychiatry Res
PUBLISHED: 05-14-2009
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Reduced ventral anterior cingulate (vACC) activity to threat is thought to reflect an impairment in regulating arousal networks in posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Concurrent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and skin conductance response (SCR) recording were used to examine neural functioning when arousal networks are engaged. Eleven participants with PTSD and 11 age- and sex-matched non-traumatized controls performed an oddball task that required responding to salient, non-trauma-related auditory target tones embedded in lower frequency background tones. Averaged target-background analyses revealed significantly greater dorsal ACC, supramarginal gyrus, and hippocampal activity in PTSD relative to control participants.With-SCR target responses resulted in increased vACC activity in controls, and dorsal ACC activity in PTSD. PTSD participants had reduced vACC activity relative to controls to target tones when SCR responses were present. This reduction in vACC in PTSD relative to controls was not apparent in without-SCR responses. These findings suggest that a reduction in vACC in PTSD occurs specifically when arousal networks are engaged.
Related JoVE Video
Autonomic and cortical reactivity in acute and chronic posttraumatic stress.
Biol Psychol
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
This study investigated attention (P300 amplitude) and orienting (skin conductance amplitude) to auditory tones in a standard oddball task in early trauma-exposed groups (Acute Stress Disorder: ASD) (n=12) or no ASD (n=13), compared to individuals with chronic posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) (n=17) and non-trauma-exposed controls (n=17). Individuals with ASD displayed significantly higher SCR and P3 amplitudes to target tones than individuals with PTSD, non-traumatized controls, and traumatized controls. These findings suggest that attention and orienting responses are greater to neutral, task-relevant target tones in ASD than PTSD and traumatized and non-traumatized controls.
Related JoVE Video
Comparison of ictal electroencephalogram between ultrabrief- and brief-pulse right unilateral electroconvulsive therapy: a multitaper jackknife analysis.
J ECT
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Characterization of the ictal electroencephalogram (EEG) generated during ultrabrief pulse electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is important to progress its use in routine ECT practice particularly in indicating treatment efficacy. The study compared 2- to 5-Hz and 5.2- to 13-Hz bands of the ictal EEG signal between brief- and ultrabrief-pulse ECT.
Related JoVE Video

What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.