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Suberoylanilide Hydroxamic Acid (SAHA)-Induced Dynamics of a Human Histone Deacetylase Protein Interaction Network.
Mol. Cell Proteomics
PUBLISHED: 07-29-2014
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Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are targets for cancer therapy. Suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) is an HDAC inhibitor approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. To obtain a better mechanistic understanding of the Sin3/HDAC complex in cancer, we extended its protein-protein interaction network and identified a mutually exclusive pair within the complex. We then assessed the effects of SAHA on the disruption of the complex network through six homologous baits. SAHA perturbs multiple protein interactions and therefore compromises the composition of large parts of the Sin3/HDAC network. A comparison of the effect of SAHA treatment on gene expression in breast cancer cells to a knockdown of the ING2 subunit indicated that a portion of the anticancer effects of SAHA may be attributed to the disruption of ING2's association with the complex. Our dynamic protein interaction network resource provides novel insights into the molecular mechanism of SAHA action and demonstrates the potential for drugs to rewire networks.
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Selective amputation of the pharynx identifies a FoxA-dependent regeneration program in planaria.
Elife
PUBLISHED: 04-17-2014
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Planarian flatworms regenerate every organ after amputation. Adult pluripotent stem cells drive this ability, but how injury activates and directs stem cells into the appropriate lineages is unclear. Here we describe a single-organ regeneration assay in which ejection of the planarian pharynx is selectively induced by brief exposure of animals to sodium azide. To identify genes required for pharynx regeneration, we performed an RNAi screen of 356 genes upregulated after amputation, using successful feeding as a proxy for regeneration. We found that knockdown of 20 genes caused a wide range of regeneration phenotypes and that RNAi of the forkhead transcription factor FoxA, which is expressed in a subpopulation of stem cells, specifically inhibited regrowth of the pharynx. Selective amputation of the pharynx therefore permits the identification of genes required for organ-specific regeneration and suggests an ancient function for FoxA-dependent transcriptional programs in driving regeneration. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02238.001.
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Controlling for gene expression changes in transcription factor protein networks.
Mol. Cell Proteomics
PUBLISHED: 04-10-2014
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The development of affinity purification technologies combined with mass spectrometric analysis of purified protein mixtures has been used both to identify new protein-protein interactions and to define the subunit composition of protein complexes. Transcription factor protein interactions, however, have not been systematically analyzed using these approaches. Here, we investigated whether ectopic expression of an affinity tagged transcription factor as bait in affinity purification mass spectrometry experiments perturbs gene expression in cells, resulting in the false positive identification of bait-associated proteins when typical experimental controls are used. Using quantitative proteomics and RNA sequencing, we determined that the increase in the abundance of a set of proteins caused by overexpression of the transcription factor RelA is not sufficient for these proteins to then co-purify non-specifically and be misidentified as bait-associated proteins. Therefore, typical controls should be sufficient, and a number of different baits can be compared with a common set of controls. This is of practical interest when identifying bait interactors from a large number of different baits. As expected, we found several known RelA interactors enriched in our RelA purifications (NF?B1, NF?B2, Rel, RelB, I?B?, I?B?, and I?B?). We also found several proteins not previously described in association with RelA, including the small mitochondrial chaperone Tim13. Using a variety of biochemical approaches, we further investigated the nature of the association between Tim13 and NF?B family transcription factors. This work therefore provides a conceptual and experimental framework for analyzing transcription factor protein interactions.
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The cohesin acetyltransferase Eco1 coordinates rDNA replication and transcription.
EMBO Rep.
PUBLISHED: 03-14-2014
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Eco1 is the acetyltransferase that establishes sister-chromatid cohesion during DNA replication. A budding yeast strain with an eco1 mutation that genocopies Roberts syndrome has reduced ribosomal DNA (rDNA) transcription and a transcriptional signature of starvation. We show that deleting FOB1--a gene that encodes a replication fork-blocking protein specific for the rDNA region--rescues rRNA production and partially rescues transcription genome-wide. Further studies show that deletion of FOB1 corrects the genome-wide replication defects, nucleolar structure, and rDNA segregation that occur in the eco1 mutant. Our study highlights that the presence of cohesin at the rDNA locus has a central role in controlling global DNA replication and gene expression.
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Functional genomic analysis of the periodic transcriptome in the developing Drosophila wing.
Dev. Cell
PUBLISHED: 02-25-2014
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The eukaryotic cell cycle, driven by both transcriptional and posttranslational mechanisms, is the central molecular oscillator underlying tissue growth throughout animals. Although genome-wide studies have investigated cell-cycle-associated transcription in unicellular systems, global patterns of periodic transcription in multicellular tissues remain largely unexplored. Here we define the cell-cycle-associated transcriptome of the developing Drosophila wing epithelium and compare it with that of cultured Drosophila S2 cells, revealing a core set of periodic genes and a surprising degree of context specificity in periodic transcription. We further employ RNAi-mediated phenotypic profiling to define functional requirements for more than 300 periodic genes, with a focus on those required for cell proliferation in vivo. Finally, we investigate uncharacterized genes required for interkinetic nuclear migration. Combined, these findings provide a global perspective on cell-cycle control in vivo, and they highlight a critical need to understand the context-specific regulation of cell proliferation.
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Characterization of a highly conserved histone related protein, Ydl156w, and its functional associations using quantitative proteomic analyses.
Mol. Cell Proteomics
PUBLISHED: 12-22-2011
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A significant challenge in biology is to functionally annotate novel and uncharacterized proteins. Several approaches are available for deducing the function of proteins in silico based upon sequence homology and physical or genetic interaction, yet this approach is limited to proteins with well-characterized domains, paralogs and/or orthologs in other species, as well as on the availability of suitable large-scale data sets. Here, we present a quantitative proteomics approach extending the protein network of core histones H2A, H2B, H3, and H4 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, among which a novel associated protein, the previously uncharacterized Ydl156w, was identified. In order to predict the role of Ydl156w, we designed and applied integrative bioinformatics, quantitative proteomics and biochemistry approaches aiming to infer its function. Reciprocal analysis of Ydl156w protein interactions demonstrated a strong association with all four histones and also to proteins strongly associated with histones including Rim1, Rfa2 and 3, Yku70, and Yku80. Through a subsequent combination of the focused quantitative proteomics experiments with available large-scale genetic interaction data and Gene Ontology functional associations, we provided sufficient evidence to associate Ydl156w with multiple processes including chromatin remodeling, transcription and DNA repair/replication. To gain deeper insights into the role of Ydl156w in histone biology we investigated the effect of the genetic deletion of ydl156w on H4 associated proteins, which lead to a dramatic decrease in the association of H4 with RNA polymerase III proteins. The implication of a role for Ydl156w in RNA Polymerase III mediated transcription was consequently verified by RNA-Seq experiments. Finally, using these approaches we generated a refined network of Ydl156w-associated proteins.
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Human mediator subunit MED26 functions as a docking site for transcription elongation factors.
Cell
PUBLISHED: 04-15-2011
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Promoter-proximal pausing by initiated RNA polymerase II (Pol II) and regulated release of paused polymerase into productive elongation has emerged as a major mechanism of transcription activation. Reactivation of paused Pol II correlates with recruitment of super-elongation complexes (SECs) containing ELL/EAF family members, P-TEFb, and other proteins, but the mechanism of their recruitment is an unanswered question. Here, we present evidence for a role of human Mediator subunit MED26 in this process. We identify in the conserved N-terminal domain of MED26 overlapping docking sites for SEC and a second ELL/EAF-containing complex, as well as general initiation factor TFIID. In addition, we present evidence consistent with the model that MED26 can function as a molecular switch that interacts first with TFIID in the Pol II initiation complex and then exchanges TFIID for complexes containing ELL/EAF and P-TEFb to facilitate transition of Pol II into the elongation stage of transcription.
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Dot1 and histone H3K79 methylation in natural telomeric and HM silencing.
Mol. Cell
PUBLISHED: 02-16-2011
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The expression of genes residing near telomeres is attenuated through telomere position-effect variegation (TPEV). By using a URA3 reporter located at TEL-VII-L of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, it was proposed that the disruptor of telomeric silencing-1 (Dot1) regulates TPEV by catalyzing H3K79 methylation. URA3 reporter assays also indicated that H3K79 methylation is required for HM silencing. Surprisingly, a genome-wide expression analysis of H3K79 methylation-defective mutants identified only a few telomeric genes, such as COS12 at TEL-VII-L, to be subject to H3K79 methylation-dependent natural silencing. Consistently, loss of Dot1 did not globally alter Sir2 or Sir3 occupancy in subtelomeric regions, but only led to some telomere-specific changes. Furthermore, H3K79 methylation by Dot1 did not play a role in the maintenance of natural HML silencing. Therefore, commonly used URA3 reporter assays may not report on natural PEV, and therefore, studies concerning the epigenetic mechanism of silencing in yeast should also employ assays reporting on natural gene expression patterns.
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Drosophila Orb2 targets genes involved in neuronal growth, synapse formation, and protein turnover.
Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.
PUBLISHED: 06-14-2010
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In the study of long-term memory, how memory persists is a fundamental and unresolved question. What are the molecular components of the long-lasting memory trace? Previous studies in Aplysia and Drosophila have found that a neuronal variant of a RNA-binding protein with a self-perpetuating prion-like property, cytoplasmic polyadenylation element binding protein, is required for the persistence of long-term synaptic facilitation in the snail and long-term memory in the fly. In this study, we have identified the mRNA targets of the Drosophila neuronal cytoplasmic polyadenylation element binding protein, Orb2. These Orb2 targets include genes involved in neuronal growth, synapse formation, and intriguingly, protein turnover. These targets suggest that the persistent form of the memory trace might be comprised of molecules that maintain a sustained, permissive environment for synaptic growth in an activated synapse.
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Polycystin-dependent fluid flow sensing targets histone deacetylase 5 to prevent the development of renal cysts.
Development
PUBLISHED: 02-24-2010
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Polycystin 1 and polycystin 2 are large transmembrane proteins, which, when mutated, cause autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), a highly prevalent human genetic disease. The polycystins are thought to form a receptor-calcium channel complex in the plasma membrane of renal epithelial cells and elicit a calcium influx in response to mechanical stimulation, such as fluid flow across the apical surface of renal epithelial cells. The functional role of the polycystins in mechanosensation remains largely unknown. Here, we found that myocyte enhancer factor 2C (MEF2C) and histone deacetylase 5 (HDAC5), two key regulators of cardiac hypertrophy, are targets of polycystin-dependent fluid stress sensing in renal epithelial cells in mice. We show that fluid flow stimulation of polarized epithelial monolayers induced phosphorylation and nuclear export of HDAC5, which are crucial events in the activation of MEF2C-based transcription. Kidney-specific knockout of Mef2c, or genetrap-inactivation of a MEF2C transcriptional target, MIM, resulted in extensive renal tubule dilation and cysts, whereas Hdac5 heterozygosity or treatment with TSA, an HDAC inhibitor, reduced cyst formation in Pkd2(-/-) mouse embryos. These findings suggest a common signaling motif between myocardial hypertrophy and maintenance of renal epithelial architecture, and a potential therapeutic approach to treat ADPKD.
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Expression profiling of S. pombe acetyltransferase mutants identifies redundant pathways of gene regulation.
BMC Genomics
PUBLISHED: 01-22-2010
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Histone acetyltransferase enzymes (HATs) are implicated in regulation of transcription. HATs from different families may overlap in target and substrate specificity.
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Cohesinopathy mutations disrupt the subnuclear organization of chromatin.
J. Cell Biol.
PUBLISHED: 11-09-2009
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In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, chromatin is spatially organized within the nucleus with centromeres clustering near the spindle pole body, telomeres clustering into foci at the nuclear periphery, ribosomal DNA repeats localizing within a single nucleolus, and transfer RNA (tRNA) genes present in an adjacent cluster. [corrected] Furthermore, certain genes relocalize from the nuclear interior to the periphery upon transcriptional activation. The molecular mechanisms responsible for the organization of the genome are not well understood. We find that evolutionarily conserved proteins in the cohesin network play an important role in the subnuclear organization of chromatin. Mutations that cause human cohesinopathies had little effect on chromosome cohesion, centromere clustering, or viability when expressed in yeast. However, two mutations in particular lead to defects in (a) GAL2 transcription and recruitment to the nuclear periphery, (b) condensation of mitotic chromosomes, (c) nucleolar morphology, and (d) tRNA gene-mediated silencing and clustering of tRNA genes. We propose that the cohesin network affects gene regulation by facilitating the subnuclear organization of chromatin.
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Histone H3 lysine 36 dimethylation (H3K36me2) is sufficient to recruit the Rpd3s histone deacetylase complex and to repress spurious transcription.
J. Biol. Chem.
PUBLISHED: 01-20-2009
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Histone methylation is associated with both transcription activation and repression. However, the functions of different states of methylation remain largely elusive. Here, using methyl-lysine analog technology, we demonstrate that the histone deacetylase complex, Rpd3S, can distinguish the nucleosomes methylated to different extents and that K36me2 is sufficient to target Rpd3S in vitro. Through a genome-wide survey, we identified a few mutants in which the level of K36me3 is significantly reduced, whereas the level of K36me2 is sustained. Transcription analysis and genome-wide histone modification studies on these mutants suggested that K36me2 is sufficient to target Rpd3S in vivo, thereby maintaining a functional Set2-Rpd3S pathway.
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Human family with sequence similarity 60 member A (FAM60A) protein: a new subunit of the Sin3 deacetylase complex.
Mol. Cell Proteomics
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Here we describe the function of a previously uncharacterized protein, named family with sequence similarity 60 member A (FAM60A) that maps to chromosome 12p11 in humans. We use quantitative proteomics to determine that the main biochemical partners of FAM60A are subunits of the Sin3 deacetylase complex and show that FAM60A resides in active HDAC complexes. In addition, we conduct gene expression pathway analysis and find that FAM60A regulates expression of genes that encode components of the TGF-beta signaling pathway. Moreover, our studies reveal that loss of FAM60A or another component of the Sin3 complex, SDS3, leads to a change in cell morphology and an increase in cell migration. These studies reveal the function of a previously uncharacterized protein and implicate the Sin3 complex in suppressing cell migration.
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Cohesin proteins promote ribosomal RNA production and protein translation in yeast and human cells.
PLoS Genet.
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Cohesin is a protein complex known for its essential role in chromosome segregation. However, cohesin and associated factors have additional functions in transcription, DNA damage repair, and chromosome condensation. The human cohesinopathy diseases are thought to stem not from defects in chromosome segregation but from gene expression. The role of cohesin in gene expression is not well understood. We used budding yeast strains bearing mutations analogous to the human cohesinopathy disease alleles under control of their native promoter to study gene expression. These mutations do not significantly affect chromosome segregation. Transcriptional profiling reveals that many targets of the transcriptional activator Gcn4 are induced in the eco1-W216G mutant background. The upregulation of Gcn4 was observed in many cohesin mutants, and this observation suggested protein translation was reduced. We demonstrate that the cohesinopathy mutations eco1-W216G and smc1-Q843? are associated with defects in ribosome biogenesis and a reduction in the actively translating fraction of ribosomes, eiF2?-phosphorylation, and (35)S-methionine incorporation, all of which indicate a deficit in protein translation. Metabolic labeling shows that the eco1-W216G and smc1-Q843? mutants produce less ribosomal RNA, which is expected to constrain ribosome biogenesis. Further analysis shows that the production of rRNA from an individual repeat is reduced while copy number remains unchanged. Similar defects in rRNA production and protein translation are observed in a human Roberts syndrome cell line. In addition, cohesion is defective specifically at the rDNA locus in the eco1-W216G mutant, as has been previously reported for Roberts syndrome. Collectively, our data suggest that cohesin proteins normally facilitate production of ribosomal RNA and protein translation, and this is one way they can influence gene expression. Reduced translational capacity could contribute to the human cohesinopathies.
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Hsp90 stress potentiates rapid cellular adaptation through induction of aneuploidy.
Nature
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Aneuploidy--the state of having uneven numbers of chromosomes--is a hallmark of cancer and a feature identified in yeast from diverse habitats. Recent studies have shown that aneuploidy is a form of large-effect mutation that is able to confer adaptive phenotypes under diverse stress conditions. Here we investigate whether pleiotropic stress could induce aneuploidy in budding yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisae). We show that whereas diverse stress conditions can induce an increase in chromosome instability, proteotoxic stress, caused by transient Hsp90 (also known as Hsp82 or Hsc82) inhibition or heat shock, markedly increased chromosome instability to produce a cell population with high karyotype diversity. The induced chromosome instability is linked to an evolutionarily conserved role for the Hsp90 chaperone complex in kinetochore assembly. Continued growth in the presence of an Hsp90 inhibitor resulted in the emergence of drug-resistant colonies with chromosome XV gain. This drug-resistance phenotype is a quantitative trait involving copy number increases of at least two genes located on chromosome XV. Short-term exposure to Hsp90 stress potentiated fast adaptation to unrelated cytotoxic compounds by means of different aneuploid chromosome stoichiometries. These findings demonstrate that aneuploidy is a form of stress-inducible mutation in eukaryotes, capable of fuelling rapid phenotypic evolution and drug resistance, and reveal a new role for Hsp90 in regulating the emergence of adaptive traits under stress.
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JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.