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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Evidence of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus in domestic mice in Gabon; risk of emergence of LCMV encephalitis in Central Africa.
J. Virol.
PUBLISHED: 11-08-2014
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Lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) can cause acute fatal disease in all continents but was never detected in Africa. We report the first detection of LCMV RNA in common European house mouse (Mus musculus domesticus) in Africa. Phylogenetic analyses showed close relationship with North American strains. These findings suggest appearance of LCMV acute encephalitis cases. This is a perfect example of virus dissemination by its natural host that may have dramatic public health consequences.
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Effects of mefloquine use on Plasmodium vivax multidrug resistance.
Emerging Infect. Dis.
PUBLISHED: 10-02-2014
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Numerous studies have indicated a strong association between amplification of the multidrug resistance-1 gene and in vivo and in vitro mefloquine resistance of Plasmodium falciparum. Although falciparum infection usually is not treated with mefloquine, incorrect diagnosis, high frequency of undetected mixed infections, or relapses of P. vivax infection triggered by P. falciparum infections expose non-P. falciparum parasites to mefloquine. To assess the consequences of such unintentional treatments on P. vivax, we studied variations in number of Pvmdr-1 (PlasmoDB accession no. PVX_080100, NCBI reference sequence NC_009915.1) copies worldwide in 607 samples collected in areas with different histories of mefloquine use from residents and from travelers returning to France. Number of Pvmdr-1 copies correlated with drug use history. Treatment against P. falciparum exerts substantial collateral pressure against sympatric P. vivax, jeopardizing future use of mefloquine against P. vivax. A drug policy is needed that takes into consideration all co-endemic species of malaria parasites.
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Rapid 96-well plates DNA extraction and sequencing procedures to identify genome-wide transposon insertion sites in a difficult to lyse bacterium: Lactobacillus casei.
J. Microbiol. Methods
PUBLISHED: 08-16-2014
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Random transposon mutagenesis followed by adequate screening methods is an unavoidable procedure to characterize genetics of bacterial adaptation to environmental changes. We have recently constructed a mutant library of Lactobacillus casei and we aimed to fully annotate it. However, we have observed that, for L. casei which is a difficult to lyse bacterium, methods used to identify the transposon insertion site in a few mutants (transposon rescue by restriction and recircularization or PCR-based methods) were not transposable for a larger number because they are too time-consuming and sometimes not reliable. Here, we describe a method for large-scale and reliable identification of transposon insertion sites in a L. casei mutant library of 9250 mutants. DNA extraction procedure based on silica membranes in 96-column format was optimized to obtain genomic DNA from a large number of mutants. Then reliable direct genomic sequencing was improved to fit the obtained genomic DNA extracts. Using this procedure, readable and identifiable sequences were obtained for 87% of the L. casei mutants. This method extends the applications of a library of this type, reduces the number of insertions needed to be screened, and allows selection of specific mutants from an arrayed and stored mutant library. This method is applicable to any already existing mutant library (obtained by transposon or insertional mutagenesis) and could be useful for other bacterial species, especially for highly lysis-resistant bacteria species such as lactic acid bacteria.
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Inter- and Intraspecies Transfer of a Clostridium difficile Conjugative Transposon Conferring Resistance to MLSB.
Microb. Drug Resist.
PUBLISHED: 07-24-2014
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Resistance to the macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B group of antibiotics in Clostridium difficile is generally due to erm(B) genes. Tn6194, a conjugative transposon initially detected in PCR-ribotype 027 isolates, is an erm(B)-containing element also detected in other relevant C. difficile PCR-ribotypes. In this study, the genome of a C. difficile PCR-ribotype 001 strain was sequenced, and an element with two nucleotidic changes compared to Tn6194 was detected. This element was transferred by filter mating assays to recipient strains of C. difficile belonging to PCR-ribotype 009 and 027 and to a recipient strain of Enterococcus faecalis. Transconjugants were characterized by Southern blotting and genome sequencing, and integration sites in all transconjugants were identified. The element integrated the genome of C. difficile at different sites and the genome of E. faecalis at a unique site. This study is the first molecular characterization of an erm(B)-containing conjugative transposon in C. difficile and provides additional evidence of the antibiotic resistance transmission risk among pathogenic bacteria occupying the same human intestinal niche.
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Genome Sequence of "Candidatus Arthromitus" sp. Strain SFB-Mouse-NL, a Commensal Bacterium with a Key Role in Postnatal Maturation of Gut Immune Functions.
Genome Announc
PUBLISHED: 07-19-2014
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"Candidatus Arthromitus" sp. strain SFB-mouse-NL (SFB, segmented filamentous bacteria) is a commensal bacterium necessary for inducing the postnatal maturation of homeostatic innate and adaptive immune responses in the mouse gut. Here, we report the genome sequence of this bacterium, which sets it apart from earlier sequenced mouse SFB isolates.
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Characterization of a genogroup I sapovirus isolated from chimpanzees in the republic of congo.
Genome Announc
PUBLISHED: 07-19-2014
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Sapoviruses, which are members of the Caliciviridae family, are small nonenveloped viruses known to infect a large spectrum of mammalian hosts. We report here the first complete genome sequences of two genogroup I sapoviruses isolated from fecal samples from chimpanzees living in the Tchimpounga sanctuary, Republic of Congo.
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Parallel independent evolution of pathogenicity within the genus Yersinia.
Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.
PUBLISHED: 04-21-2014
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The genus Yersinia has been used as a model system to study pathogen evolution. Using whole-genome sequencing of all Yersinia species, we delineate the gene complement of the whole genus and define patterns of virulence evolution. Multiple distinct ecological specializations appear to have split pathogenic strains from environmental, nonpathogenic lineages. This split demonstrates that contrary to hypotheses that all pathogenic Yersinia species share a recent common pathogenic ancestor, they have evolved independently but followed parallel evolutionary paths in acquiring the same virulence determinants as well as becoming progressively more limited metabolically. Shared virulence determinants are limited to the virulence plasmid pYV and the attachment invasion locus ail. These acquisitions, together with genomic variations in metabolic pathways, have resulted in the parallel emergence of related pathogens displaying an increasingly specialized lifestyle with a spectrum of virulence potential, an emerging theme in the evolution of other important human pathogens.
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Comparison of widely used Listeria monocytogenes strains EGD, 10403S, and EGD-e highlights genomic variations underlying differences in pathogenicity.
MBio
PUBLISHED: 03-27-2014
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For nearly 3 decades, listeriologists and immunologists have used mainly three strains of the same serovar (1/2a) to analyze the virulence of the bacterial pathogen Listeria monocytogenes. The genomes of two of these strains, EGD-e and 10403S, were released in 2001 and 2008, respectively. Here we report the genome sequence of the third reference strain, EGD, and extensive genomic and phenotypic comparisons of the three strains. Strikingly, EGD-e is genetically highly distinct from EGD (29,016 single nucleotide polymorphisms [SNPs]) and 10403S (30,296 SNPs), and is more related to serovar 1/2c than 1/2a strains. We also found that while EGD and 10403S strains are genetically very close (317 SNPs), EGD has a point mutation in the transcriptional regulator PrfA (PrfA*), leading to constitutive expression of several major virulence genes. We generated an EGD-e PrfA* mutant and showed that EGD behaves like this strain in vitro, with slower growth in broth and higher invasiveness in human cells than those of EGD-e and 10403S. In contrast, bacterial counts in blood, liver, and spleen during infection in mice revealed that EGD and 10403S are less virulent than EGD-e, which is itself less virulent than EGD-e PrfA*. Thus, constitutive expression of PrfA-regulated virulence genes does not appear to provide a significant advantage to the EGD strain during infection in vivo, highlighting the fact that in vitro invasion assays are not sufficient for evaluating the pathogenic potential of L. monocytogenes strains. Together, our results pave the way for deciphering unexplained differences or discrepancies in experiments using different L. monocytogenes strains. IMPORTANCE Over the past 3 decades, Listeria has become a model organism for host-pathogen interactions, leading to critical discoveries in a broad range of fields, including bacterial gene regulation, cell biology, and bacterial pathophysiology. Scientists studying Listeria use primarily three pathogenic strains: EGD, EGD-e, and 10403S. Despite many studies on EGD, it is the only one of the three strains whose genome has not been sequenced. Here we report the sequence of its genome and a series of important genomic and phenotypic differences between the three strains, in particular, a critical mutation in EGD's PrfA, the main regulator of Listeria virulence. Our results show that the three strains display differences which may play an important role in the virulence differences observed between the strains. Our findings will be of critical relevance to listeriologists and immunologists who have used or may use Listeria as a tool to study the pathophysiology of listeriosis and immune responses.
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Bacillus Calmette-Guérin strain differences have an impact on clinical outcome in bladder cancer immunotherapy.
Eur. Urol.
PUBLISHED: 02-28-2014
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Whether the commonly used bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) strains Connaught and Tice confer different treatment responses in non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) is unknown.
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Streptococcus agalactiae clones infecting humans were selected and fixed through the extensive use of tetracycline.
Nat Commun
PUBLISHED: 02-20-2014
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Streptococcus agalactiae (Group B Streptococcus, GBS) is a commensal of the digestive and genitourinary tracts of humans that emerged as the leading cause of bacterial neonatal infections in Europe and North America during the 1960s. Due to the lack of epidemiological and genomic data, the reasons for this emergence are unknown. Here we show by comparative genome analysis and phylogenetic reconstruction of 229 isolates that the rise of human GBS infections corresponds to the selection and worldwide dissemination of only a few clones. The parallel expansion of the clones is preceded by the insertion of integrative and conjugative elements conferring tetracycline resistance (TcR). Thus, we propose that the use of tetracycline from 1948 onwards led in humans to the complete replacement of a diverse GBS population by only few TcR clones particularly well adapted to their host, causing the observed emergence of GBS diseases in neonates.
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The Yersinia pseudotuberculosis complex: characterization and delineation of a new species, Yersinia wautersii.
Int. J. Med. Microbiol.
PUBLISHED: 01-24-2014
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The genus Yersinia contains three species pathogenic for humans, one of which is the enteropathogen Yersinia pseudotuberculosis. A recent analysis by Multi Locus Sequence Typing (MLST) of the 'Y. pseudotuberculosis complex' revealed that this complex comprises three distinct populations: the Y. pestis/Y. pseudotuberculosis group, the recently described species Yersinia similis, and a third not yet characterized population designated 'Korean Group', because most strains were isolated in Korea. The aim of this study was to perform an in depth phenotypic and genetic characterization of the three populations composing the Y. pseudotuberculosis complex (excluding Y. pestis, which belonged to the Y. pseudotuberculosis cluster in the MLST analysis). Using a set of strains representative of each group, we found that the three populations had close metabolic properties, but were nonetheless distinguishable based on D-raffinose and D-melibiose fermentation, and on pyrazinamidase activity. Moreover, high-resolution electrospray mass spectrometry highlighted protein peaks characteristic of each population. Their 16S rRNA gene sequences shared high identity (?99.5%), but specific nucleotide signatures for each group were identified. Multi-Locus Sequence Analysis also identified three genetically closely related but distinct populations. Finally, an Average Nucleotide Identity (ANI) analysis performed after sequencing the genomes of a subset of strains of each group also showed that intragroup identity (average for each group ?99%) was higher than intergroup diversity (94.6-97.4%). Therefore, all phenotypic and genotypic traits studied concurred with the initial MLST data indicating that the Y. pseudotuberculosis complex comprises a third and clearly distinct population of strains forming a novel Yersinia species that we propose to designate Yersinia wautersii sp. nov. The isolation of some strains from humans, the detection of virulence genes (on the pYV and pVM82 plasmids, or encoding the superantigen ypmA) in some isolates, and the absence of pyrazinamidase activity (a hallmark of pathogenicity in the genus Yersinia) argue for the pathogenic potential of Y. wautersii.
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Haemorrhagic toxin and lethal toxin from Clostridium sordellii strain vpi9048: molecular characterization and comparative analysis of substrate specificity of the large clostridial glucosylating toxins.
Cell. Microbiol.
PUBLISHED: 01-02-2014
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Large clostridial glucosylating toxins (LCGTs) are produced by toxigenic strains of Clostridium difficile, Clostridium perfringens, Clostridium novyi and Clostridium sordellii. While most C. sordellii strains solely produce lethal toxin (TcsL), C. sordellii strain VPI9048 co-produces both hemorrhagic toxin (TcsH) and TcsL. Here, the sequences of TcsH-9048 and TcsL-9048 are provided, showing that both toxins retain conserved LCGT features and that TcsL and TcsH are highly related to Toxin A (TcdA) and Toxin B (TcdB) from C. difficile strain VPI10463. The substrate profile of the toxins was investigated with recombinant LCGT transferase domains (rN) and a wide panel of small GTPases. rN-TcsH-9048 and rN-TcdA-10463 glucosylated preferably Rho-GTPases but also Ras-GTPases to some extent. In this respect, rN-TcsH-9048 and rN-TcdA-10463 differ from the respective full-length TcsH-9048 and TcdA-10463, which exclusively glucosylate Rho-GTPases. rN-TcsL-9048 and full length TcsL-9048 glucosylate both Rho- and Ras-GTPases, whereas rN-TcdB-10463 and full length TcdB-10463 exclusively glucosylate Rho-GTPases. Vero cells treated with full length TcsH-9048 or TcdA-10463 also showed glucosylation of Ras, albeit to a lower extent than of Rho-GTPases. Thus, in vitro analysis of substrate spectra using recombinant transferase domains corresponding to the auto-proteolytically cleaved domains, predicts more precisely the in vivo substrates than the full length toxins. Except for TcdB-1470, all LCGTs evoked increased expression of the small GTPase RhoB, which exhibited cytoprotective activity in cells treated with TcsL isoforms, but pro-apoptotic activity in cells treated with TcdA, TcdB, and TcsH. All LCGTs induced a rapid dephosphorylation of pY118-paxillin and of pS144/141-PAK1/2 prior to actin filament depolymerization indicating that disassembly of focal adhesions is an early event leading to the disorganization of the actin cytoskeleton.
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An Atypical Clostridium Strain Related to the Clostridium botulinum Group III Strain Isolated from a Human Blood Culture.
J. Clin. Microbiol.
PUBLISHED: 10-02-2013
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A nontoxigenic strain isolated from a fatal human case of bacterial sepsis was identified as a Clostridium strain from Clostridium botulinum group III, based on the phenotypic characters and 16S rRNA gene sequence, and was found to be related to the mosaic C. botulinum D/C strain according to a multilocus sequence analysis of 5 housekeeping genes.
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Identification and characterization of the genetic changes responsible for the characteristic smooth-to-rough morphotype alterations of clinically persistent Mycobacterium abscessus.
Mol. Microbiol.
PUBLISHED: 08-28-2013
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Mycobacterium abscessus is an emerging pathogen that is increasingly recognized as a relevant cause of human lung infection in cystic fibrosis patients. This highly antibiotic-resistant mycobacterium is an exception within the rapidly growing mycobacteria, which are mainly saprophytic and non-pathogenic organisms. M.?abscessus manifests as either a smooth (S) or a rough (R) colony morphotype, which is of clinical importance as R morphotypes are associated with more severe and persistent infections. To better understand the molecular mechanisms behind the S/R alterations, we analysed S and R variants of three isogenic M.?abscessus?S/R pairs using an unbiased approach involving genome and transcriptome analyses, transcriptional fusions and integrating constructs. This revealed different small insertions, deletions (indels) or single nucleotide polymorphisms within the non-ribosomal peptide synthase gene cluster mps1-mps2-gap or mmpl4b in the three R variants, consistent with the transcriptional differences identified within this genomic locus that is implicated in the synthesis and transport of Glyco-Peptido-Lipids (GPL). In contrast to previous reports, the identification of clearly defined genetic lesions responsible for the loss of GPL-production or transport makes a frequent switching back-and-forth between smooth and rough morphologies in M.?abscessus highly unlikely, which is important for our understanding of persistent M.?abscessus infections.
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Draft Genome Sequences of Lactobacillus equicursoris CIP 110162T and Lactobacillus sp. Strain CRBIP 24.137, Isolated from Thoroughbred Racehorse Feces and Human Urine, Respectively.
Genome Announc
PUBLISHED: 08-24-2013
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We report the draft genome sequences of strain Lactobacillus equicursoris CIP 110162(T), isolated from racehorse breed feces, and Lactobacillus sp. strain CRBIP 24.137, isolated from human urine; the two strains are closely related. The total lengths of the 116 and 62 scaffolds are about 2.157 and 2.358 Mb, with G+C contents of 46 and 45% and 2,279 and 2,342 coding sequences (CDSs), respectively.
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Draft Genome Sequence of Lactobacillus hominis Strain CRBIP 24.179T, Isolated from Human Intestine.
Genome Announc
PUBLISHED: 08-24-2013
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We report the draft genome sequence of the strain Lactobacillus hominis CRBIP 24.179(T), isolated from a human clinical sample. The total length of the 28 contigs is about 1.9 Mb, with a G+C content of 37% and 1,983 coding sequences.
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Draft Genome Sequence of Lactobacillus pasteurii CRBIP 24.76T.
Genome Announc
PUBLISHED: 08-24-2013
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We report the draft genome sequence of the type strain Lactobacillus pasteurii CRBIP 24.76, which is closely related to L. gigeriorum CRBIP 24.85(T), isolated from a chicken crop. The total length of the 29 contigs is about 1.9 Mb, with a G+C content of 40% and 1,946 coding sequences.
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Draft Genome Sequences of Five Strains of Lactobacillus acidophilus, Strain CIP 76.13T, Isolated from Humans, Strains CIRM-BIA 442 and CIRM-BIA 445, Isolated from Dairy Products, and Strains DSM 20242 and DSM 9126 of Unknown Origin.
Genome Announc
PUBLISHED: 08-24-2013
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Lactobacillus acidophilus is a natural inhabitant of mammalian gastrointestinal systems and is used in dairy and pharmaceutical products. Five draft genome sequences, covering 1,995,790 nucleotides (nt) on average, are divided into 19 to 34 scaffolds covering 1,995 to 2,053 genes. The draft genome sequences were compared to the sequence of the L. acidophilus NCFM dairy strain.
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Candida albicans is not always the preferential yeast colonizing humans: a study in Wayampi Amerindians.
J. Infect. Dis.
PUBLISHED: 07-31-2013
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In industrialized countries Candida albicans is considered the predominant commensal yeast of the human intestine, with approximately 40% prevalence in healthy adults. We discovered a highly original colonization pattern that challenges this current perception by studying in a 4- year interval a cohort of 151 Amerindians living in a remote community (French Guiana), and animals from their environment. The prevalence of C. albicans was persistently low (3% and 7% of yeast carriers). By contrast, Candida krusei and Saccharomyces cerevisiae were detected in over 30% of carriers. We showed that C. krusei and S. cerevisiae carriage was of food or environmental origin, whereas C. albicans carriage was associated with specific risk factors (being female and living in a crowded household). We also showed using whole-genome sequence comparison that C. albicans strains can persist in the intestinal tract of a healthy individual over a 4-year period.
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A molecular marker of artemisinin-resistant Plasmodium falciparum malaria.
Nature
PUBLISHED: 07-15-2013
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Plasmodium falciparum resistance to artemisinin derivatives in southeast Asia threatens malaria control and elimination activities worldwide. To monitor the spread of artemisinin resistance, a molecular marker is urgently needed. Here, using whole-genome sequencing of an artemisinin-resistant parasite line from Africa and clinical parasite isolates from Cambodia, we associate mutations in the PF3D7_1343700 kelch propeller domain (K13-propeller) with artemisinin resistance in vitro and in vivo. Mutant K13-propeller alleles cluster in Cambodian provinces where resistance is prevalent, and the increasing frequency of a dominant mutant K13-propeller allele correlates with the recent spread of resistance in western Cambodia. Strong correlations between the presence of a mutant allele, in vitro parasite survival rates and in vivo parasite clearance rates indicate that K13-propeller mutations are important determinants of artemisinin resistance. K13-propeller polymorphism constitutes a useful molecular marker for large-scale surveillance efforts to contain artemisinin resistance in the Greater Mekong Subregion and prevent its global spread.
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Occurrence of mutations impairing sigma factor B (SigB) function upon inactivation of Listeria monocytogenes genes encoding surface proteins.
Microbiology (Reading, Engl.)
PUBLISHED: 05-08-2013
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Bacteria of the genus Listeria contain the largest family of LPXTG surface proteins covalently anchored to the peptidoglycan. The extent to which these proteins may function or be regulated cooperatively is at present unknown. Because of their unique cellular location, we reasoned that distinct LPXTG proteins could act as elements contributing to cell wall homeostasis or influencing the stability of other surface proteins bound to peptidoglycan. To test this hypothesis, we used proteomics to analyse mutants of the intracellular pathogen Listeria monocytogenes lacking distinct LPXTG proteins implicated in pathogen-host interactions, such as InlA, InlF, InlG, InlH, InlJ, LapB and Vip. Changes in the cell wall proteome were found in inlG and vip mutants, which exhibited reduced levels of the LPXTG proteins InlH, Lmo0610, Lmo0880 and Lmo2085, all regulated by the stress-related sigma factor SigB. The ultimate basis of this alteration was uncovered by genome sequencing, which revealed that these inlG and vip mutants carried loss-of-function mutations in the rsbS, rsbU and rsbV genes encoding regulatory proteins that control SigB activity. Attempts to recapitulate this negative selection of SigB in a large series of new inlG or vip mutants constructed for this purpose were, however, unsuccessful. These results indicate that inadvertent secondary mutations affecting SigB functionality can randomly arise in L. monocytogenes when using common genetic procedures or during subculturing. Testing of SigB activity could be therefore valuable when manipulating genetically L. monocytogenes prior to any subsequent phenotypic analysis. This test may be even more justified when generating deletions affecting cell envelope components.
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Comparative genomics of emerging pathogens in the Candida glabrata clade.
BMC Genomics
PUBLISHED: 04-08-2013
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Candida glabrata follows C. albicans as the second or third most prevalent cause of candidemia worldwide. These two pathogenic yeasts are distantly related, C. glabrata being part of the Nakaseomyces, a group more closely related to Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Although C. glabrata was thought to be the only pathogenic Nakaseomyces, two new pathogens have recently been described within this group: C. nivariensis and C. bracarensis. To gain insight into the genomic changes underlying the emergence of virulence, we sequenced the genomes of these two, and three other non-pathogenic Nakaseomyces, and compared them to other sequenced yeasts.
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Reductive evolution in Streptococcus agalactiae and the emergence of a host adapted lineage.
BMC Genomics
PUBLISHED: 04-01-2013
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During host specialization, inactivation of genes whose function is no more required is favored by changes in selective constraints and evolutionary bottlenecks. The Gram positive bacteria Streptococcus agalactiae (also called GBS), responsible for septicemia and meningitis in neonates also emerged during the seventies as a cause of severe epidemics in fish farms. To decipher the genetic basis for the emergence of these highly virulent GBS strains and of their adaptation to fish, we have analyzed the genomic sequence of seven strains isolated from fish and other poikilotherms.
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Modular evolution of TnGBSs, a new family of integrative and conjugative elements associating insertion sequence transposition, plasmid replication, and conjugation for their spreading.
J. Bacteriol.
PUBLISHED: 02-22-2013
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Integrative and conjugative elements (ICEs) have a major impact on gene flow and genome dynamics in bacteria. The ICEs TnGBS1 and TnGBS2, first identified in Streptococcus agalactiae, use a DDE transposase, unlike most characterized ICEs, which depend on a phage-like integrase for their mobility. Here we identified 56 additional TnGBS-related ICEs by systematic genome analysis. Interestingly, all except one are inserted in streptococcal genomes. Sequence comparison of the proteins conserved among these ICEs defined two subtypes related to TnGBS1 or TnGBS2. We showed that both types encode different conjugation modules: a type IV secretion system, a VirD4 coupling protein, and a relaxase and its cognate oriT site, shared with distinct lineages of conjugative elements of Firmicutes. Phylogenetic analysis suggested that TnGBSs evolved from two conjugative elements of different origins by the successive recruitment of a transposition module derived from insertion sequences (ISs). Furthermore, TnGBSs share replication modules with different plasmids. Mutational analyses and conjugation experiments showed that TnGBS1 and TnGBS2 combine replication and transposition upstream promoters for their transfer and stabilization. Despite an evolutionarily successful horizontal dissemination within the genus Streptococcus, these ICEs have a restricted host range. However, we reveal that for TnGBS1 and TnGBS2, this host restriction is not due to a transfer incompatibility linked to the conjugation machineries but most likely to their ability for transient maintenance through replication after their transfer.
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Draft Genome Sequence of a Clinical Strain of Yersinia enterocolitica (IP10393) of Bioserotype 4/O:3 from France.
Genome Announc
PUBLISHED: 02-21-2013
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We sequenced the genome of a clinical isolate of Yersinia enterocolitica (IP10393) from France. This strain belongs to bioserotype 4/O:3, which is the most common pathogenic subgroup worldwide. The draft genome has a size of 4,463,212 bp and a G+C content of 47.0%, and it is predicted to contain 4,181 coding sequences.
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Dandruff is associated with disequilibrium in the proportion of the major bacterial and fungal populations colonizing the scalp.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-31-2013
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The bacterial and fungal communities associated with dandruff were investigated using culture-independent methodologies in the French subjects. The major bacterial and fungal species inhabiting the scalp subjects were identified by cloning and sequencing of the conserved ribosomal unit regions (16S for bacterial and 28S-ITS for fungal) and were further quantified by quantitative PCR. The two main bacterial species found on the scalp surface were Propionibacterium acnes and Staphylococcus epidermidis, while Malassezia restricta was the main fungal inhabitant. Dandruff was correlated with a higher incidence of M. restricta and S. epidermidis and a lower incidence of P. acnes compared to the control population (p<0.05). These results suggested for the first time using molecular methods, that dandruff is linked to the balance between bacteria and fungi of the host scalp surface.
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Genomic analysis of smooth tubercle bacilli provides insights into ancestry and pathoadaptation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.
Nat. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 01-06-2013
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Global spread and limited genetic variation are hallmarks of M. tuberculosis, the agent of human tuberculosis. In contrast, Mycobacterium canettii and related tubercle bacilli that also cause human tuberculosis and exhibit unusual smooth colony morphology are restricted to East Africa. Here, we sequenced and analyzed the whole genomes of five representative strains of smooth tubercle bacilli (STB) using Sanger (4-5× coverage), 454/Roche (13-18× coverage) and/or Illumina DNA sequencing (45-105× coverage). We show that STB isolates are highly recombinogenic and evolutionarily early branching, with larger genome sizes, higher rates of genetic variation, fewer molecular scars and distinct CRISPR-Cas systems relative to M. tuberculosis. Despite the differences, all tuberculosis-causing mycobacteria share a highly conserved core genome. Mouse infection experiments showed that STB strains are less persistent and virulent than M. tuberculosis. We conclude that M. tuberculosis emerged from an ancestral STB-like pool of mycobacteria by gain of persistence and virulence mechanisms, and we provide insights into the molecular events involved.
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Evolutionary genetic dissection of human interferons.
J. Exp. Med.
PUBLISHED: 12-12-2011
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Interferons (IFNs) are cytokines that play a key role in innate and adaptive immune responses. Despite the large number of immunological studies of these molecules, the relative contributions of the numerous IFNs to human survival remain largely unknown. Here, we evaluated the extent to which natural selection has targeted the human IFNs and their receptors, to provide insight into the mechanisms that govern host defense in the natural setting. We found that some IFN-? subtypes, such as IFN-?6, IFN-?8, IFN-?13, and IFN-?14, as well as the type II IFN-?, have evolved under strong purifying selection, attesting to their essential and nonredundant function in immunity to infection. Conversely, selective constraints have been relaxed for other type I IFNs, particularly for IFN-?10 and IFN-?, which have accumulated missense or nonsense mutations at high frequencies within the population, suggesting redundancy in host defense. Finally, type III IFNs display geographically restricted signatures of positive selection in European and Asian populations, indicating that genetic variation at these genes has conferred a selective advantage to the host, most likely by increasing resistance to viral infection. Our population genetic analyses show that IFNs differ widely in their biological relevance, and highlight evolutionarily important determinants of host immune responsiveness.
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Reduced impact of pyrimethamine drug pressure on Plasmodium malariae dihydrofolate reductase gene.
Antimicrob. Agents Chemother.
PUBLISHED: 11-28-2011
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Molecular investigations performed following the emergence of sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) resistance in Plasmodium falciparum have allowed the identification of the dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) enzyme as the target of pyrimethamine. Although clinical cases of Plasmodium malariae are not usually treated with antifolate therapy, incorrect diagnosis and the high frequency of undetected mixed infections has probably exposed non-P. falciparum parasites to antifolate therapy in many areas. In this context, we aimed to assess the worldwide genetic diversity of the P. malariae dhfr gene in 123 samples collected in Africa and Asia, areas with different histories of SP use. Among the 10 polymorphic sites found, we have observed 7 new mutations (K55E, S58R, S59A, F168S, N194S, D207G, and T221A), which led us to describe 6 new DHFR proteins. All isolates from African countries were classified as wild type, while new mutations and haplotypes were recognized as exclusive to Madagascar (except for the double mutations at nucleotides 341 and 342 [S114N] found in one Cambodian isolate). Among these nonsynonymous mutations, two were likely related to pyrimethamine resistance: S58R (corresponding to C59R in P. falciparum and S58R in Plasmodium vivax; observed in one Malagasy sample) and S114N (corresponding to S108N in P. falciparum and S117N in P. vivax; observed in three Cambodian samples).
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Plasmodium knowlesi infection in humans, Cambodia, 2007-2010.
Emerging Infect. Dis.
PUBLISHED: 10-18-2011
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Two cases of Plasmodium knowlesi infection in humans were identified in Cambodia by 3 molecular detection assays and sequencing. This finding confirms the widespread distribution of P. knowlesi malaria in humans in Southeast Asia. Further wide-scale studies are required to assess the public health relevance of this zoonotic malaria parasite.
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Performance of the CareStart™ G6PD deficiency screening test, a point-of-care diagnostic for primaquine therapy screening.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 08-22-2011
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Development of reliable, easy-to-use, rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) to detect glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency at point of care is essential to deploying primaquine therapies as part of malaria elimination strategies. We assessed a kit under research and development called CareStart™ G6PD deficiency screening test (Access Bio, New Jersey, USA) by comparing its performance to quantitative G6PD enzyme activity using a standardized spectrophotometric method (gold standard). Blood samples (n?=?903) were collected from Cambodian adults living in Pailin province, western Cambodia. G6PD enzyme activities ranged from 0 to 20.5 U/g Hb (median 12.0 U/g Hg). Based on a normal haemoglobin concentration and wild-type G6PD gene, the normal values of G6PD enzymatic activity for this population was 3.6 to 20.5 U/g Hg (95(th) percentiles from 5.5 to 17.2 U/g Hg). Ninety-seven subjects (10.7%) had <3.6 U/g Hg and were classified as G6PD deficient. Prevalence of deficiency was 15.0% (64/425) among men and 6.9% (33/478) among women. Genotype was analyzed in 66 G6PD-deficient subjects and 63 of these exhibited findings consistent with Viangchang genotype. The sensitivity and specificity of the CareStart™ G6PD deficiency screening test was 0.68 and 1.0, respectively. Its detection threshold was <2.7 U/g Hg, well within the range of moderate and severe enzyme deficiencies. Thirteen subjects (1.4%, 12 males and 1 female) with G6PD enzyme activities <2 U/g Hg were falsely classified as "normal" by RDT. This experimental RDT test here evaluated outside of the laboratory for the first time shows real promise, but safe application of it will require lower rates of falsely "normal" results.
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In vitro susceptibility to pyrimethamine of DHFR I164L single mutant Plasmodium falciparum.
Malar. J.
PUBLISHED: 05-18-2011
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Recently, Plasmodium falciparum parasites bearing Pfdhfr I164L single mutation were found in Madagascar. These new mutants may challenge the use of antifolates for the intermittent preventive treatment of malaria during pregnancy (IPTp). Assays with transgenic bacteria suggested that I164L parasites have a wild-type phenotype for pyrimethamine but it had to be confirmed by testing the parasites themselves.
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Lactobacillus gigeriorum sp. nov., isolated from chicken crop.
Int. J. Syst. Evol. Microbiol.
PUBLISHED: 03-18-2011
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In the early 1980s, a facultatively anaerobic, non-motile, short rod, designated 202(T), was isolated from a chicken crop and identified as a homofermentative lactic acid bacterium. Phylogenetic analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence revealed that the strain was affiliated with the genus Lactobacillus, clustering within the Lactobacillus acidophilus-delbrueckii group. In this analysis, strain 202(T) appeared to be most closely related to the type strains of Lactobacillus intestinalis and Lactobacillus amylolyticus, with gene sequence similarities of 96.1 and 96.2?%, respectively. Strain 202(T) was found to differ from these two species, however, when investigated by multilocus sequence analysis, and it also differed in terms of some of its metabolic properties. On the basis of these observations, strain 202(T) is considered to represent a novel species in the genus Lactobacillus, for which the name Lactobacillus gigeriorum sp. nov. is proposed; the type strain is 202(T) (?=?CRBIP 24.85(T)?=?DSM 23908(T)).
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Evolutionary genetics evidence of an essential, nonredundant role of the IFN-? pathway in protective immunity.
Hum. Mutat.
PUBLISHED: 02-08-2011
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Identifying how natural selection has affected immunity-related genes can provide insights into the mechanisms that have been crucial for our survival against infection. Rare disorders of either chain of the IFN-? receptor, but not of IFN-? itself, have been shown to confer predisposition to mycobacterial disease in patients otherwise normally resistant to most viruses. Here, we defined the levels of naturally occurring variation in the three specific genes controlling the IFN-? pathway (IFNG, IFNGR1, IFNGR2) and assessed whether and how natural selection has acted on them. To this end, we resequenced the three genes in 186 individuals from sub-Saharan Africa, Europe, and East-Asia. Our results show that IFNG is subject to strong purifying selection against nonsynonymous variants. Conversely, IFNGR1 and IFNGR2 evolve under more relaxed selective constraints, although they are not completely free to accumulate amino acid variation having a major impact on protein function. In addition, we have identified signatures of population-specific positive selection, including at one intronic variant known to be associated with higher production of IFN-?. The integration of our population genetic data into a clinical framework demonstrates that the IFN-? pathway is essential and nonredundant in host defense, probably because of its role in protective immunity against mycobacteria.
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Chloroquine clinical failures in P. falciparum malaria are associated with mutant Pfmdr-1, not Pfcrt in Madagascar.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 06-22-2010
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Molecular studies have demonstrated that mutations in the Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter gene (Pfcrt) play a major role in chloroquine resistance, while mutations in P. falciparum multidrug resistance gene (Pfmdr-1) act as modulator. In Madagascar, the high rate of chloroquine treatment failure (44%) appears disconnected from the overall level of in vitro CQ susceptibility (prevalence of CQ-resistant parasites <5%) or Pfcrt mutant isolates (<1%), strongly contrasting with sub-Saharan African countries. Previous studies showed a high frequency of Pfmdr-1 mutant parasites (>60% of isolates), but did not explore their association with P. falciparum chloroquine resistance. To document the association of Pfmdr-1 alleles with chloroquine resistance in Madagascar, 249 P. falciparum samples collected from patients enrolled in a chloroquine in vivo efficacy study were genotyped in Pfcrt/Pfmdr-1 genes as well as the estimation of the Pfmdr-1 copy number. Except 2 isolates, all samples displayed a wild-type Pfcrt allele without Pfmdr-1 amplification. Chloroquine treatment failures were significantly associated with Pfmdr-1 86Y mutant codon (OR?=?4.6). The cumulative incidence of recurrence of patients carrying the Pfmdr-1 86Y mutation at day 0 (21 days) was shorter than patients carrying Pfmdr-1 86N wild type codon (28 days). In an independent set of 90 selected isolates, in vitro susceptibility to chloroquine was not associated with Pfmdr-1 polymorphisms. Analysis of two microsatellites flanking Pfmdr-1 allele showed that mutations occurred on multiple genetic backgrounds. In Madagascar, Pfmdr-1 polymorphism is associated with late chloroquine clinical failures and unrelated with in vitro susceptibility or Pfcrt genotype. These results highlight the limits of the current in vitro tests routinely used to monitor CQ drug resistance in this unique context. Gaining insight about the mechanisms that regulate polymorphism in Pfmdr1 remains important, particularly regarding the evolution and spread of Pfmdr-1 alleles in P. falciparum populations under changing drug pressure which may have important consequences in terms of antimalarial use management.
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Association of microsatellite variations of Plasmodium falciparum Na+/H+ exchanger (Pfnhe-1) gene with reduced in vitro susceptibility to quinine: lack of confirmation in clinical isolates from Africa.
Am. J. Trop. Med. Hyg.
PUBLISHED: 05-05-2010
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We sought to test the association of polymorphisms in Plasmodium falciparum nhe-1 (Pfnhe-1, gene PF13_0019) with in vitro susceptibility to quinine, which was previously reported in a limited number of reference strains or culture-adapted isolates. Determination of in vitro susceptibility to quinine, genotyping of Pfnhe-1 ms4760 microsatellite and polymorphism in codon 76 of Pfcrt were performed for 83 isolates obtained from symptomatic malaria-infected travelers returning from various African countries to France or from subjects living in Madagascar. Nineteen different ms4760 microsatellite profiles of Pfnhe-1 were found including 14 not previously described. Multivariate analysis showed no significant association between the in vitro susceptibility to quinine with particular ms4760 profiles. Contrary to previous reports, we only observed that the number of NHNDNHNNDDD repeats was positively associated with the increased IC50 of QN (P = 0.01). We concluded that the studied polymorphisms in Pfnhe-1 did not appear as valid molecular markers of in vitro susceptibility to quinine in P. falciparum isolates from Africa. Because we did not include any isolate of Asian origin in our series, these results did not exclude the possibility of regional associations, for example in South-East Asia.
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Origins of the recent emergence of Plasmodium falciparum pyrimethamine resistance alleles in Madagascar.
Antimicrob. Agents Chemother.
PUBLISHED: 03-22-2010
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The combination of sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine is recommended for use as intermittent preventive treatment of malaria during pregnancy and is deployed in Africa. The emergence and the spread of resistant parasites are major threats to such an intervention. We have characterized the Plasmodium falciparum dhfr (pfdhfr) haplotypes and flanking microsatellites in 322 P. falciparum isolates collected from the Comoros Islands and Madagascar. One hundred fifty-six (48.4%) carried the wild-type pfdhfr allele, 19 (5.9%) carried the S108N single-mutation allele, 30 (9.3%) carried the I164L single-mutation allele, 114 (35.4%) carried the N51I/C59R/S108N triple-mutation allele, and 3 (1.0%) carried the N51I/C59R/S108N/I164L quadruple-mutation allele. Microsatellite analysis showed the introduction from the Comoros Islands of the ancestral pfdhfr triple mutant allele of Asian origin and its spread in Madagascar. Evidence for the emergence on multiple occasions of the I164L single-mutation pfdhfr allele in Madagascar was also obtained. Thus, the conditions required to generate mutants with quadruple mutations are met in Madagascar, representing a serious threat to current drug policy.
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Plasmodium vivax clinical malaria is commonly observed in Duffy-negative Malagasy people.
Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A.
PUBLISHED: 03-15-2010
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Malaria therapy, experimental, and epidemiological studies have shown that erythrocyte Duffy blood group-negative people, largely of African ancestry, are resistant to erythrocyte Plasmodium vivax infection. These findings established a paradigm that the Duffy antigen is required for P. vivax erythrocyte invasion. P. vivax is endemic in Madagascar, where admixture of Duffy-negative and Duffy-positive populations of diverse ethnic backgrounds has occurred over 2 millennia. There, we investigated susceptibility to P. vivax blood-stage infection and disease in association with Duffy blood group polymorphism. Duffy blood group genotyping identified 72% Duffy-negative individuals (FY*B(ES)/*B(ES)) in community surveys conducted at eight sentinel sites. Flow cytometry and adsorption-elution results confirmed the absence of Duffy antigen expression on Duffy-negative erythrocytes. P. vivax PCR positivity was observed in 8.8% (42/476) of asymptomatic Duffy-negative people. Clinical vivax malaria was identified in Duffy-negative subjects with nine P. vivax monoinfections and eight mixed Plasmodium species infections that included P. vivax (4.9 and 4.4% of 183 participants, respectively). Microscopy examination of blood smears confirmed blood-stage development of P. vivax, including gametocytes. Genotyping of polymorphic surface and microsatellite markers suggested that multiple P. vivax strains were infecting Duffy-negative people. In Madagascar, P. vivax has broken through its dependence on the Duffy antigen for establishing human blood-stage infection and disease. Further studies are necessary to identify the parasite and host molecules that enable this Duffy-independent P. vivax invasion of human erythrocytes.
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From array-based hybridization of Helicobacter pylori isolates to the complete genome sequence of an isolate associated with MALT lymphoma.
BMC Genomics
PUBLISHED: 02-26-2010
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Helicobacter pylori infection is associated with several gastro-duodenal inflammatory diseases of various levels of severity. To determine whether certain combinations of genetic markers can be used to predict the clinical source of the infection, we analyzed well documented and geographically homogenous clinical isolates using a comparative genomics approach.
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Genome sequence of Streptococcus gallolyticus: insights into its adaptation to the bovine rumen and its ability to cause endocarditis.
J. Bacteriol.
PUBLISHED: 02-05-2010
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Streptococcus gallolyticus (formerly known as Streptococcus bovis biotype I) is an increasing cause of endocarditis among streptococci and frequently associated with colon cancer. S. gallolyticus is part of the rumen flora but also a cause of disease in ruminants as well as in birds. Here we report the complete nucleotide sequence of strain UCN34, responsible for endocarditis in a patient also suffering from colon cancer. Analysis of the 2,239 proteins encoded by its 2,350-kb-long genome revealed unique features among streptococci, probably related to its adaptation to the rumen environment and its capacity to cause endocarditis. S. gallolyticus has the capacity to use a broad range of carbohydrates of plant origin, in particular to degrade polysaccharides derived from the plant cell wall. Its genome encodes a large repertoire of transporters and catalytic activities, like tannase, phenolic compounds decarboxylase, and bile salt hydrolase, that should contribute to the detoxification of the gut environment. Furthermore, S. gallolyticus synthesizes all 20 amino acids and more vitamins than any other sequenced Streptococcus species. Many of the genes encoding these specific functions were likely acquired by lateral gene transfer from other bacterial species present in the rumen. The surface properties of strain UCN34 may also contribute to its virulence. A polysaccharide capsule might be implicated in resistance to innate immunity defenses, and glucan mucopolysaccharides, three types of pili, and collagen binding proteins may play a role in adhesion to tissues in the course of endocarditis.
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Parasite polymorphism and severe malaria in Dakar (Senegal): a West African urban area.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 02-01-2010
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Transmission of malaria in West African urban areas is low and healthcare facilities are well organized. However, malaria mortality remains high. We conducted a survey in Dakar with the general objective to establish who died from severe malaria (SM) in urban areas (particularly looking at the age-groups) and to compare parasite isolates associated with mild or severe malaria.
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Geographic structuring of the Plasmodium falciparum sarco(endo)plasmic reticulum Ca2+ ATPase (PfSERCA) gene diversity.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 01-22-2010
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Artemisinin, a thapsigargin-like sesquiterpene has been shown to inhibit the Plasmodium falciparum sarco/endoplasmic reticulum calcium-ATPase PfSERCA. To collect baseline pfserca sequence information before field deployment of Artemisinin-based Combination therapies that may select mutant parasites, we conducted a sequence analysis of 100 isolates from multiple sites in Africa, Asia and South America. Coding sequence diversity was large, with 29 mutated codons, including 32 SNPs (average of one SNP/115 bp), of which 19 were novel mutations. Most SNP detected in this study were clustered within a region in the cytosolic head of the protein. The PfSERCA functional domains were very well conserved, with non synonymous mutations located outside the functional domains, except for the S769N mutation associated in French Guiana with elevated IC(50) for artemether. The S769N mutation is located close to the hinge of the headpiece, which in other species modulates calcium affinity and in consequence efficacy of inhibitors, possibly linking calcium homeostasis to drug resistance. Genetic diversity was highest in Senegal, Brazil and French Guiana, and few mutations were identified in Asia. Population genetic analysis was conducted for a partial fragment of the gene encompassing nucleotide coordinates 87-2862 (unambiguous sequence available for 96 isolates). This supported a geographic clustering, with a separation between Old and New World samples and one dominant ancestral haplotype. Genetic drift alone cannot explain the observed polymorphism, suggesting that other evolutionary mechanisms are operating. One possible contributor could be the frequency of haemoglobinopathies that are associated with calcium dysregulation in the erythrocyte.
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Analysis of the Legionella longbeachae genome and transcriptome uncovers unique strategies to cause Legionnaires disease.
PLoS Genet.
PUBLISHED: 01-20-2010
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Legionella pneumophila and L. longbeachae are two species of a large genus of bacteria that are ubiquitous in nature. L. pneumophila is mainly found in natural and artificial water circuits while L. longbeachae is mainly present in soil. Under the appropriate conditions both species are human pathogens, capable of causing a severe form of pneumonia termed Legionnaires disease. Here we report the sequencing and analysis of four L. longbeachae genomes, one complete genome sequence of L. longbeachae strain NSW150 serogroup (Sg) 1, and three draft genome sequences another belonging to Sg1 and two to Sg2. The genome organization and gene content of the four L. longbeachae genomes are highly conserved, indicating strong pressure for niche adaptation. Analysis and comparison of L. longbeachae strain NSW150 with L. pneumophila revealed common but also unexpected features specific to this pathogen. The interaction with host cells shows distinct features from L. pneumophila, as L. longbeachae possesses a unique repertoire of putative Dot/Icm type IV secretion system substrates, eukaryotic-like and eukaryotic domain proteins, and encodes additional secretion systems. However, analysis of the ability of a dotA mutant of L. longbeachae NSW150 to replicate in the Acanthamoeba castellanii and in a mouse lung infection model showed that the Dot/Icm type IV secretion system is also essential for the virulence of L. longbeachae. In contrast to L. pneumophila, L. longbeachae does not encode flagella, thereby providing a possible explanation for differences in mouse susceptibility to infection between the two pathogens. Furthermore, transcriptome analysis revealed that L. longbeachae has a less pronounced biphasic life cycle as compared to L. pneumophila, and genome analysis and electron microscopy suggested that L. longbeachae is encapsulated. These species-specific differences may account for the different environmental niches and disease epidemiology of these two Legionella species.
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Plasmodium falciparum drug resistance in Madagascar: facing the spread of unusual pfdhfr and pfmdr-1 haplotypes and the decrease of dihydroartemisinin susceptibility.
Antimicrob. Agents Chemother.
PUBLISHED: 08-24-2009
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The aim of this study was to provide the first comprehensive spatiotemporal picture of Plasmodium falciparum resistance in various geographic areas in Madagascar. Additional data about the antimalarial resistance in the neighboring islands of the Comoros archipelago were also collected. We assessed the prevalence of pfcrt, pfmdr-1, pfdhfr, and pfdhps mutations and the pfmdr-1 gene copy number in 1,596 P. falciparum isolates collected in 26 health centers (20 in Madagascar and 6 in the Comoros Islands) from 2006 to 2008. The in vitro responses to a panel of drugs by 373 of the parasite isolates were determined. The results showed (i) unusual profiles of chloroquine susceptibility in Madagascar, (ii) a rapid rise in the frequency of parasites with both the pfdhfr and the pfdhps mutations, (iii) the alarming emergence of the single pfdhfr 164L genotype, and (iv) the progressive loss of the most susceptible isolates to artemisinin derivatives. In the context of the implementation of the new national policy for the fight against malaria, continued surveillance for the detection of P. falciparum resistance in the future is required.
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Pseudomonas brassicacearum subsp. neoaurantiaca subsp. nov., orange-pigmented bacteria isolated from soil and the rhizosphere of agricultural plants.
Int. J. Syst. Evol. Microbiol.
PUBLISHED: 07-21-2009
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A large group of 38 strains of saprophytic bacteria was isolated from soil and the rhizosphere of agricultural plants. The novel organisms were Gram-negative, aerobic, rod-shaped bacteria that produced a green fluorescent pigment, a red-orange diffusible pigment and a complex mixture of phloroglucinol derivates with antimicrobial activity. The latter have not been found in other bacteria, but are peculiar to ferns. The bacteria were vigorous denitrifiers that synthesized levan from sucrose and liquefied gelatin, but were found not to degrade aesculin, starch, agar, Tween 80 or DNA. Bacterial growth was found to occur at 4 degrees C but not at 40 degrees C. The predominant cellular fatty acids were 16 : 0, 16 : 1(n-7), 18 : 1(n-7) and 17 : 0 cyclo. The G+C content of the novel bacteria was 61.0-62.9 mol%. 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis indicated that the representative strain CIP 109457(T) had a clear affiliation with Pseudomonas sensu stricto groups, with the nearest relatives being Pseudomonas brassicacearum, P. thivervalensis, P. corrugata, P. mediterranea and P. kilonensis. DNA-DNA hybridization experiments showed that the group of isolated strains exhibited high levels of genetic relatedness (81-100 %), confirming that they are representatives of the same species. At the same time, they bound at low levels (4-46 %) with DNA of the type strains of their nearest relatives with the exception of P. brassicacearum; DNA binding of 90 % with the DNA of P. brassicacearum CIP 107059(T) suggested that the bacteria studied belong to this species. Analysis of taxonomic data indicated that the group of novel bacteria maintain a distinct phenotypic profile, allowing the description of novel subspecies within P. brassicacearum, for which the following names are proposed: Pseudomonas brassicacearum subsp. brassicacearum subsp. nov. (type strain DBK11(T) =CFBP 11706(T) =CIP 107059(T) =DSM 13227(T) =JCM 11938(T)) and Pseudomonas brassicacearum subsp. neoaurantiaca subsp. nov., with the type strain CIP 109457(T) (=ATCC 49054(T) =IMV 387(T) =VKM B-1524(T)).
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Complete mitochondrial genome sequences of three Nakaseomyces species reveal invasion by palindromic GC clusters and considerable size expansion.
FEMS Yeast Res.
PUBLISHED: 07-16-2009
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Here we report the sequence of three mitochondrial genomes from yeasts of the Nakaseomyces clade that includes the pathogenic yeast Candida glabrata, namely, that of Kluyveromyces delphensis, Candida castellii and Kluyveromyces bacillisporus. The gene content is equivalent to that of C. glabrata, but reveals the existence of new group I introns in COX1 and CYTB and new potential intronic endonucleases. Gene order is highly rearranged in these genomes, which contain numerous palindromic GC clusters. The more GC nucleotides these elements contain, the longer and more AT-rich are the intergenes containing them, leading to a direct relationship between the number of Gs and Cs within the elements and the size of the genomes. Thus, there is a fivefold difference in size between the smallest and the largest mitochondrial genome, with the largest being the most AT-rich overall. Sequences are available under EMBL accession numbers FM995164, FM995165, and FM995166.
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High prevalence and fixation of Plasmodium vivax dhfr/dhps mutations related to sulfadoxine/pyrimethamine resistance in French Guiana.
Am. J. Trop. Med. Hyg.
PUBLISHED: 06-27-2009
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Plasmodium vivax isolates from French Guiana were studied for the presence of mutations associated with sulfadoxine/pyrimethamine (SP) drug resistance. Ninety-six blood samples were collected from 2000 to 2005 from symptomatic malaria patients. SP drug resistance was predicted by determining point mutations in the dihydrofolate reductase (pvdhfr) and dihydropteroate synthase (pvdhps) genes. All samples showed mutant genotypes in both genes with a prevalence > 90% for the 58R, 117N, 382C, and 383G. A new mutation (116G) in pvdhfr was found at a frequency of 3.3%. Six different pvdhfr/dhps multilocus genotypes were observed with the predominance of the quintuple mutant-type 58R/117N/173L-382C/383G (59.3%). No significant differences were observed between the prevalence of haplotypes and the year of collection. Our results indicate that, in this area, the fixation of SP drug-resistant parasites in the P. vivax population is stable.
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Evolutionary dynamics of human Toll-like receptors and their different contributions to host defense.
PLoS Genet.
PUBLISHED: 04-07-2009
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Infectious diseases have been paramount among the threats to health and survival throughout human evolutionary history. Natural selection is therefore expected to act strongly on host defense genes, particularly on innate immunity genes whose products mediate the direct interaction between the host and the microbial environment. In insects and mammals, the Toll-like receptors (TLRs) appear to play a major role in initiating innate immune responses against microbes. In humans, however, it has been speculated that the set of TLRs could be redundant for protective immunity. We investigated how natural selection has acted upon human TLRs, as an approach to assess their level of biological redundancy. We sequenced the ten human TLRs in a panel of 158 individuals from various populations worldwide and found that the intracellular TLRs -- activated by nucleic acids and particularly specialized in viral recognition -- have evolved under strong purifying selection, indicating their essential non-redundant role in host survival. Conversely, the selective constraints on the TLRs expressed on the cell surface -- activated by compounds other than nucleic acids -- have been much more relaxed, with higher rates of damaging nonsynonymous and stop mutations tolerated, suggesting their higher redundancy. Finally, we tested whether TLRs have experienced spatially-varying selection in human populations and found that the region encompassing TLR10-TLR1-TLR6 has been the target of recent positive selection among non-Africans. Our findings indicate that the different TLRs differ in their immunological redundancy, reflecting their distinct contributions to host defense. The insights gained in this study foster new hypotheses to be tested in clinical and epidemiological genetics of infectious disease.
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Genome sequence of Vibrio splendidus: an abundant planctonic marine species with a large genotypic diversity.
Environ. Microbiol.
PUBLISHED: 04-01-2009
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Vibrio splendidus is a dominant Vibrio species in seawater presenting a remarkable genetic diversity; several strains have been linked to invertebrates mortality. We report the complete genome sequence of V. splendidus LGP32, an oyster pathogen, and its comparison with partial genome sequences from related strains. As is typical for the genus, V. splendidus LGP32 contains two chromosomes (3.29 and 1.67 Mb) and most essential cellular processes are encoded by chromosome 1. Comparison with two other V. splendidus partial genome sequences (strains 12B01 and Med222) confirms the previously suggested high genotypic diversity within this species and led to the identification of numerous strain-specific regions that could frequently not be assigned to a specific mechanisms of recombination. Surprisingly, the chromosomal integron, the most variable genetic element in all other Vibrio species analysed to date, is absent from 12B01 and inactivated by a mobile element in Med222, while in LGP32 it only contains a limited number of cassettes. Finally, we found that the LGP32 integron contains a new dfrA cassette, related to those found in resistance integrons of gram-negative clinical isolates. Those results suggest that marine Vibrio can be a source of antibiotic resistance genes.
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Population diversity and antibody selective pressure to Plasmodium falciparum MSP1 block2 locus in an African malaria-endemic setting.
BMC Microbiol.
PUBLISHED: 03-10-2009
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Genetic evidence for diversifying selection identified the Merozoite Surface Protein1 block2 (PfMSP1 block2) as a putative target of protective immunity against Plasmodium falciparum. The locus displays three family types and one recombinant type, each with multiple allelic forms differing by single nucleotide polymorphism as well as sequence, copy number and arrangement variation of three amino acid repeats. The family-specific antibody responses observed in endemic settings support immune selection operating at the family level. However, the factors contributing to the large intra-family allelic diversity remain unclear. To address this question, population allelic polymorphism and sequence variant-specific antibody responses were studied in a single Senegalese rural community where malaria transmission is intense and perennial.
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FlexiChip package: an universal microarray with a dedicated analysis software for high-thoughput SNPs detection linked to anti-malarial drug resistance.
Malar. J.
PUBLISHED: 03-02-2009
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A number of molecular tools have been developed to monitor the emergence and spread of anti-malarial drug resistance to Plasmodium falciparum. One of the major obstacles to the wider implementation of these tools is the absence of practical methods enabling high throughput analysis. Here a new Zip-code array is described, called FlexiChip, linked to a dedicated software program, which largely overcomes this problem.
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Rapid detection of point mutations in Plasmodium falciparum genes associated with antimalarial drugs resistance by using High-Resolution Melting analysis.
J. Microbiol. Methods
PUBLISHED: 02-28-2009
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We have developed a High-Resolution DNA Melting method to detect mutations related to Plasmodium falciparum resistance. This method is based on real-time PCR followed by High Resolution Melting ramping from 67 degrees C to 80 degrees C with fluorescence data acquisition set at 0.1 degrees C increments. The accuracy of the technique was assessed using 177 P. falciparum clinical isolates and two reference strains. Results perfectly matched those obtained by DNA sequencing for some important genetic markers of P. falciparum resistance. This technique could be of great value for epidemiological studies, especially in developing countries.
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Loss of heterozygosity in commensal isolates of the asexual diploid yeast Candida albicans.
Fungal Genet. Biol.
PUBLISHED: 02-20-2009
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Candida albicans is a commensal and the most frequent fungal pathogen of humans. One mechanism of genetic variation in this diploid asexual yeast involves loss of heterozygosity (LOH). LOH events occur upon infection and contribute to the acquisition of antifungal resistance in patients. In contrast, little is known about the nature and extent of LOH events during commensalism. Using a combination of single nucleotide polymorphism typing, positional transcript profiling and karyotyping, we have characterized related C. albicans commensal isolates that differ by LOH events. Most of these LOH events encompassed the entirety of the chromosome or a large region extending to the telomere, suggesting chromosome loss or mitotic recombination/break-induced replication events, respectively. They were frequently accompanied by karyotype alterations such as chromosome length polymorphism and copy number variations at other chromosomes. These results demonstrate the high plasticity of the C. albicans genome during commensalism.
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European bat Lyssavirus transmission among cats, Europe.
Emerging Infect. Dis.
PUBLISHED: 02-06-2009
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We identified 2 cases of European bat lyssavirus subtype 1 transmission to domestic carnivores (cats) in France. Bat-to-cat transmission is suspected. Low amounts of virus antigen in cat brain made diagnosis difficult.
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Plasticity and evolution of aeruginosin biosynthesis in cyanobacteria.
Appl. Environ. Microbiol.
PUBLISHED: 02-05-2009
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Aeruginosins are bioactive oligopeptides that are produced in high structural diversity by strains of the bloom-forming cyanobacterial genera Microcystis and Planktothrix. A hallmark of aeruginosins is the unusual Choi moiety central to the tetrapeptides, while other positions are occupied by variable moieties in individual congeners. Here we report on three aeruginosin synthetase gene clusters (aer) of Microcystis aeruginosa (strains PCC 7806, NIES-98, and NIES-843). The analysis and comparison the aer gene clusters provide the first insight into the molecular basis of biosynthetic and structural plasticity in aeruginosin pathways. Major parts of the aer gene clusters are highly similar in all strains, particularly the genes coding for the first three nonribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) modules except for the region coding for the second adenylation domain. However, the gene clusters differ largely in genes coding for tailoring enzymes such as halogenases and sulfotransferases, reflecting structural peculiarities in aeruginosin congeners produced by the individual strains. Significant deviations were further observed in the C-terminal NRPS modules, suggesting two distinct release mechanisms. The architecture of the gene clusters is in agreement with the particular aeruginosin variants that are produced by individual strains, the structures of two of which (aeruginosins 686 A and 686 B) were elucidated. The aer gene clusters of Microcystis and Planktothrix are proposed to originate from a common ancestor and to have evolved to their present-day diversity largely through horizontal gene transfer and recombination events.
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Signatures of purifying and local positive selection in human miRNAs.
Am. J. Hum. Genet.
PUBLISHED: 01-27-2009
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MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are noncoding RNAs involved in posttranscriptional gene repression, and their role in diverse physiological processes is increasingly recognized. Yet, few efforts have been devoted to evolutionary studies of human miRNAs. Knowledge about the way in which natural selection has targeted miRNAs should provide insight into their functional relevance as well as their mechanisms of action. Here we used miRNAs as a model system for investigating the influence of natural selection on gene regulation by characterizing the full spectrum of naturally occurring sequence variation of 117 human miRNAs from different populations worldwide. We found that purifying selection has globally constrained the diversity of miRNA-containing regions and has strongly targeted the mature miRNA. This observation emphasizes that mutations in these molecules are likely to be deleterious, and therefore they can have severe phenotypic consequences on human health. More importantly, we obtained evidence of population-specific events of positive selection acting on a number of miRNA-containing regions. Notably, our analysis revealed that positive selection has targeted a "small-RNA-rich island" on chromosome 14, harboring both miRNAs and small nucleolar RNAs, in Europeans and East Asians. These observations support the notion that the tuning of gene expression contributes to the processes by which populations adapt to specific environments. These findings will fuel future investigations exploring how genetic and functional variation of miRNAs under selection affects the repression of their mRNA targets, increasing our understanding of the role of gene regulation in population adaptation and human disease.
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Organised genome dynamics in the Escherichia coli species results in highly diverse adaptive paths.
PLoS Genet.
PUBLISHED: 01-23-2009
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The Escherichia coli species represents one of the best-studied model organisms, but also encompasses a variety of commensal and pathogenic strains that diversify by high rates of genetic change. We uniformly (re-) annotated the genomes of 20 commensal and pathogenic E. coli strains and one strain of E. fergusonii (the closest E. coli related species), including seven that we sequenced to completion. Within the approximately 18,000 families of orthologous genes, we found approximately 2,000 common to all strains. Although recombination rates are much higher than mutation rates, we show, both theoretically and using phylogenetic inference, that this does not obscure the phylogenetic signal, which places the B2 phylogenetic group and one group D strain at the basal position. Based on this phylogeny, we inferred past evolutionary events of gain and loss of genes, identifying functional classes under opposite selection pressures. We found an important adaptive role for metabolism diversification within group B2 and Shigella strains, but identified few or no extraintestinal virulence-specific genes, which could render difficult the development of a vaccine against extraintestinal infections. Genome flux in E. coli is confined to a small number of conserved positions in the chromosome, which most often are not associated with integrases or tRNA genes. Core genes flanking some of these regions show higher rates of recombination, suggesting that a gene, once acquired by a strain, spreads within the species by homologous recombination at the flanking genes. Finally, the genomes long-scale structure of recombination indicates lower recombination rates, but not higher mutation rates, at the terminus of replication. The ensuing effect of background selection and biased gene conversion may thus explain why this region is A+T-rich and shows high sequence divergence but low sequence polymorphism. Overall, despite a very high gene flow, genes co-exist in an organised genome.
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Pfmdr1 copy number and arteminisin derivatives combination therapy failure in falciparum malaria in Cambodia.
Malar. J.
PUBLISHED: 01-12-2009
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The combination of artesunate and mefloquine was introduced as the national first-line treatment for Plasmodium falciparum malaria in Cambodia in 2000. However, recent clinical trials performed at the Thai-Cambodian border have pointed to the declining efficacy of both artesunate-mefloquine and artemether-lumefantrine. Since pfmdr1 modulates susceptibility to mefloquine and artemisinin derivatives, the aim of this study was to assess the link between pfmdr1 copy number, in vitro susceptibility to individual drugs and treatment failure to combination therapy.
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Plasmodium falciparum Na+/H+ exchanger (pfnhe-1) genetic polymorphism in Indian Ocean malaria-endemic areas.
Am. J. Trop. Med. Hyg.
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To date, 11 studies conducted in different countries to test the association between Plasmodium falciparum Na(+)/H(+) exchanger gene (pfnhe-1; PF13_0019) polymorphisms and in vitro susceptibility to quinine have generated conflicting data. In this context and to extend our knowledge of the genetic polymorphism of Pfnhe gene, we have sequenced the ms4760 locus from 595 isolates collected in the Comoros (N = 250; an area with a high prevalence of chloroquine and sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine resistance) and Madagascar (N = 345; a low drug-resistance area). Among them, 29 different alleles were observed, including 8 (27%) alleles not previously described. Isolates from the Comoros showed more repeats in block II (DNNND), which some studies have found to be positively associated with in vitro resistance to quinine, compared with isolates from Madagascar. Additional studies are required to better define the mechanisms underlying quinine resistance, which involve multiple gene interactions.
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Draft genome sequence of Lactobacillus gigeriorum CRBIP 24.85T, isolated from a chicken crop.
J. Bacteriol.
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We report the draft genome of the strain Lactobacillus gigeriorum CRBIP 24.85(T), isolated from a chicken crop. The total length of the 60 scaffolds is about 1.9 Mb, with a GC content of 38% and 2,062 protein-coding sequences (CDS).
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Role of the vpe carbohydrate permease in Escherichia coli urovirulence and fitness in vivo.
Infect. Immun.
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Uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC) strains are a leading cause of infections in humans, but the mechanisms governing host colonization by this bacterium remain poorly understood. Previous studies have identified numerous gene clusters encoding proteins involved in sugar transport, in pathogen-specific islands. We investigated the role in fitness and virulence of the vpe operon encoding an EII complex of the phosphotransferase (PTS) system, which is found more frequently in human strains from infected urine and blood (45%) than in E. coli isolated from healthy humans (15%). We studied the role of this locus in vivo, using the UPEC E. coli strain AL511, mutants, and complemented derivatives in two experimental mouse models of infection. Mutant strains displayed attenuated virulence in a mouse model of sepsis. A role in kidney colonization was also demonstrated by coinfection experiments in a mouse model of pyelonephritis. Electron microscopy examinations showed that the vpeBC mutant produced much smaller amounts of a capsule-like surface material than the wild type, particularly when growing in human urine. Complementation of the vpeBC mutation led to an increase in the amount of exopolysaccharide, resistance to serum killing, and virulence. It was therefore clear that the loss of vpe genes was responsible for all the observed phenotypes. We also demonstrated the involvement of the vpe locus in gut colonization in the streptomycin-treated mouse model of intestinal colonization. These findings confirm that carbohydrate transport and metabolism underlie the ability of UPEC strains to colonize the host intestine and to infect various host sites.
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Expression of the resistance-nodulation-cell division pump AdeIJK in Acinetobacter baumannii is regulated by AdeN, a TetR-type regulator.
Antimicrob. Agents Chemother.
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Resistance-nodulation-division efflux system AdeIJK contributes to intrinsic resistance to various drug classes in Acinetobacter baumannii. By whole-genome sequencing, we have identified in clinical isolate BM4587 the adeN gene, located 813 kbp upstream from adeIJK, which encodes a TetR transcriptional regulator. In one-step mutant BM4666 overexpressing adeIJK, the deletion of cytosine 582 (C(582)) in the 3 portion of this gene was responsible for a frameshift mutation resulting in the deletion of the seven C-terminal residues. trans-Complementation of this BM4587 derivative with a plasmid expressing adeN restored antibiotic susceptibility to the host associated with the loss of adeJ overexpression. The inactivation of adeN in BM4587 led to a diminished susceptibility to antibiotics that are substrates for AdeIJK and to a 5-fold increase in adeJ expression. Taken together, these results indicate that AdeN represses AdeIJK expression. Quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR) demonstrated that AdeN is constitutively expressed in BM4587 and does not regulate its own expression. Deletion of cytosine 582 and a 394-bp deletion of the 3 part of adeN were found in independent one-step adeIJK-overexpressing mutants selected from clinical isolates BM4667 and BM4651, respectively. The corresponding alterations were located in the ?9 helix, which is known to be involved in dimerization, a process essential for the activity of TetR regulators. The adeN gene was detected in all of the 30 A. baumannii strains tested and in Acinetobacter calcoaceticus, Acinetobacter nosocomialis, and Acinetobacter pittii.
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Lactobacillus pasteurii sp. nov. and Lactobacillus hominis sp. nov.
Int. J. Syst. Evol. Microbiol.
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Strains 1517(T) and 61D(T) were characterized by phenotypic and molecular taxonomic methods. These Gram-positive lactic acid bacteria were homo-fermentative, facultatively anaerobic short rods. They were phylogenetically related to the genus Lactobacillus according to 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, with 99 % similarity between strain 1517(T) and the type strain of Lactobacillus gigeriorum, and 98.6, 98.5 and 98.4 % between strain 61D(T) and Lactobacillus gasseri, Lactobacillus taiwanensis and Lactobacillus johnsonii, respectively. Multilocus sequence analysis and metabolic analysis of both strains showed variation between the two strains and their close relatives, with variation in the position of the pheS and rpoA genes. The DNA-DNA relatedness of 43.5 % between strain 1517(T) and L. gigeriorum, and 38.6, 29.9 and 39.7 % between strain 61D(T) and L. johnsonii, L. taiwanensis and L. gasseri, respectively, confirmed their status as novel species. Based on phenotypic and genotypic characteristics, two novel species of Lactobacillus are proposed: Lactobacillus pasteurii sp. nov., with 1517(T) ( = CRBIP 24.76(T) = DSM 23907(T)) as the type strain, and Lactobacillus hominis sp. nov., with 61D(T) (=CRBIP 24.179(T) = DSM 23910(T)) as the type strain.
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Insertion site preference of Mu, Tn5, and Tn7 transposons.
Mob DNA
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Transposons, segments of DNA that can mobilize to other locations in a genome, are often used for insertion mutagenesis or to generate priming sites for sequencing of large DNA molecules. For both of these uses, a transposon with minimal insertion bias is desired to allow complete coverage with minimal oversampling.
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Discordant temporal evolution of Pfcrt and Pfmdr1 genotypes and Plasmodium falciparum in vitro drug susceptibility to 4-aminoquinolines after drug policy change in French Guiana.
Antimicrob. Agents Chemother.
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Analysis of the evolution of drug target genes under changing drug policy is needed to assist monitoring of Plasmodium falciparum drug resistance in the field. Here we genotype Pfcrt and Pfdmr1 of 700 isolates collected in French Guiana from 2000 (5 years after withdrawal of chloroquine) to 2008, i.e., the period when the artemether-lumefantrine combination was progressively introduced and mefloquine was abandoned. Gene sequencing showed fixation of the 7G8-type Pfcrt SMVNT resistance haplotype and near fixation of the NYCDY Pfdmr1 haplotype. Pfdmr1 gene copy number correlated with 50% inhibitory concentrations of mefloquine and halofantrine (r = 0.64 and 0.47, respectively, n = 547); its temporal changes paralleled changes in in vitro mefloquine susceptibility. However, the molecular parameters studied did not account for the regained in vitro susceptibility to chloroquine and showed a poor correlation with susceptibility to artemether, lumefantrine, or quinine. Identification of novel markers of resistance to these antimalarials is needed in this South American area.
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Fuse or Die : How to survive the loss of Dam in Vibrio cholerae.
Mol. Microbiol.
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Dam methylates GATC sequences in ?-proteobacteria genomes, regulating several cellular functions including replication. In Vibrio cholerae, which has two chromosomes, Dam is essential for viability, owing to its role in chr2 replication initiation. In this study, we isolated spontaneous mutants of V. cholerae that were able to survive the deletion of dam. In these mutants, homologous recombination and chromosome dimer resolution are essential, unless DNA mismatch repair is inactivated. Furthermore, the initiator of chr2 replication, RctB, is no longer required. We show that, instead, replication of chr2 is insured by spontaneous fusion with chr1 and piggybacking its replication machinery. We report that natural fusion of chr1 and chr2 occurred by two distinct recombination pathways: homologous recombination between repeated IS elements and site-specific recombination between dif sites. Lastly, we observed a preferential fusion of the two chromosomes in their terminus of replication.
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