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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Frequency of mutations in individuals with breast cancer referred for BRCA1 and BRCA2 testing using next-generation sequencing with a 25-gene panel.
Cancer
PUBLISHED: 09-03-2014
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Next-generation sequencing (NGS) allows for simultaneous sequencing of multiple cancer susceptibility genes and, for an individual, may be more efficient and less expensive than sequential testing. The authors assessed the frequency of deleterious germline mutations among individuals with breast cancer who were referred for BRCA1 and BRCA2 (BRCA1/2) gene testing using a panel of 25 genes associated with inherited cancer predisposition.
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Psychometric evaluation of the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) with Dupuytren's contracture: validity evidence using Rasch modeling.
BMC Musculoskelet Disord
PUBLISHED: 02-20-2014
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Dupuytren's contracture is a progressive, fibroproliferative disorder that causes fixed finger contractures and can lead to disability. With the advances of new therapeutic interventions, the necessity to assess the functional repercussions of this condition using valid, reliable and sensitive outcome measures is of growing interest. The Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) is one frequently used patient-reported outcome measure but its reliability and validity have never been demonstrated specifically for a population affected with Dupuytren's contracture. The objective of this study was to evaluate the psychometric properties of the DASH, with focus on validity evidence using the Rasch measurement model.
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Clinical course, costs and predictive factors for response to treatment in carpal tunnel syndrome: the PALMS study protocol.
BMC Musculoskelet Disord
PUBLISHED: 01-23-2014
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Carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) is the most common neuropathy of the upper limb and a significant contributor to hand functional impairment and disability. Effective treatment options include conservative and surgical interventions, however it is not possible at present to predict the outcome of treatment. The primary aim of this study is to identify which baseline clinical factors predict a good outcome from conservative treatment (by injection) or surgery in patients diagnosed with carpal tunnel syndrome. Secondary aims are to describe the clinical course and progression of CTS, and to describe and predict the UK cost of CTS to the individual, National Health Service (NHS) and society over a two year period.
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Distribution of neurotransmitter receptors and zinc in the pigeon (Columba livia) hippocampal formation: A basis for further comparison with the mammalian hippocampus.
J. Comp. Neurol.
PUBLISHED: 01-17-2014
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The avian hippocampal formation (HF) and mammalian hippocampus share a similar functional role in spatial cognition, but the underlying neuronal mechanisms allowing the functional similarity are incompletely understood. To understand better the organization of the avian HF and its transmitter receptors, we analyzed binding site densities for glutamatergic AMPA, NMDA, and kainate receptors; GABAA receptors; muscarinic M1 , M2 and nicotinic (nACh) acetylcholine receptors; noradrenergic ?1 and ?2 receptors; serotonergic 5-HT1A receptors; dopaminergic D1/5 receptors by using quantitative in vitro receptor autoradiography. Additionally, we performed a modified Timm staining procedure to label zinc. The regionally different receptor densities mapped well onto seven HF subdivisions previously described. Several differences in receptor expression highlighted distinct HF subdivisions. Notable examples include 1) high GABAA and ?1 receptor expression, which rendered distinctive ventral subdivisions; 2) high ?2 receptor expression, which rendered distinctive a dorsomedial subdivision; 3) distinct kainate, ?2 , and muscarinic receptor densities that rendered distinctive the two dorsolateral subdivisions; and 4) a dorsomedial region characterized by high kainate receptor density. We further observed similarities in receptor binding densities between subdivisions of the avian and mammalian HF. Despite the similarities, we propose that 300 hundred million years of independent evolution has led to a mosaic of similarities and differences in the organization of the avian HF and mammalian hippocampus and that thinking about the avian HF in terms of the strict organization of the mammalian hippocampus is likely insufficient to understand the HF of birds.
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New targets for triple-negative breast cancer.
Oncology (Williston Park, N.Y.)
PUBLISHED: 11-29-2013
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Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) lacks the three most commonly targeted receptors in human breast cancer--the estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)/neu--and it is associated with an aggressive natural history. More recently, TNBC has been further dissected into smaller, distinct subsets with unique molecular alterations and response to therapy. Large-scale genomic projects have yielded new knowledge about the molecular characteristics of TNBC, including similarities with high-grade serous ovarian cancers, suggesting a possible coordinated treatment algorithm for these malignancies. Moreover, translation of preclinical findings has led to clinical trials testing a plethora of targets and pathways in TNBC, which will be reviewed here; these include epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), angiogenesis, DNA repair capacity, epigenetic regulation, androgen receptor (AR) and folate receptor (FR) signaling, cell-cycle control, and cell survival. Given the complexity of TNBC biology and the lack of "traditional" therapeutic targets, the advancement of care for women with TNBC will require a true partnership between clinicians, translational investigators, and basic scientists.
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Predicting response to physiotherapy treatment for musculoskeletal shoulder pain: Protocol for a longitudinal cohort study.
BMC Musculoskelet Disord
PUBLISHED: 04-09-2013
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Shoulder pain affects all ages, with a lifetime prevalence of one in three. The most effective treatment is not known. Physiotherapy is often recommended as the first choice of treatment. At present, it is not possible to identify, from the initial physiotherapy assessment, which factors predict the outcome of physiotherapy for patients with shoulder pain. The primary objective of this study is to identify which patient characteristics and baseline measures, typically assessed at the first physiotherapy appointment, are related to the functional outcome of shoulder pain 6 weeks and 6 months after starting physiotherapy treatment.
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Cingulate area 32 homologies in mouse, rat, macaque and human: cytoarchitecture and receptor architecture.
J. Comp. Neurol.
PUBLISHED: 03-19-2013
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Homologizing between human and nonhuman area 32 has been impaired since Brodmann said he could not homologize with certainty human area 32 to a specific cortical domain in other species. Human area 32 has four divisions, however, and two can be structurally homologized to nonhuman species with cytoarchitecture and receptor architecture: pregenual (p32) and subgenual (s32) in human and macaque monkey and areas d32 and v32 in rat and mouse. Cytoarchitecture showed that areas d32/p32 have a dysgranular layer IV in all species and that areas v32/s32 have large and dense neurons in layer V, whereas a layer IV is not present in area v32. Areas v32/s32 have the largest neurons in layer Va. Features unique to humans include large layer IIIc pyramids in both divisions, sparse layer Vb in area p32, and elongated neurons in layer VI, with area s32 having the largest layer Va neurons. Receptor fingerprints of both subdivisions of area 32 differed between species in size and shape, although AMPA/GABAA and NMDA/GABAA ratios were comparable among humans, monkeys, and rats and were significantly lower than in mice. Layers I-III of primate and rodent area 32 subdivisions share more similarities in their receptor densities than layers IV-VI. Monkey and human subdivisions of area 32 are more similar to each other than to rat and mouse subdivisions. In combination with intracingulate connections, the location, cytoarchitecture, and ligand binding studies demonstrate critical homologies among the four species.
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Predicting response to physiotherapy treatment for musculoskeletal shoulder pain: a systematic review.
BMC Musculoskelet Disord
PUBLISHED: 02-18-2013
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People suffering from musculoskeletal shoulder pain are frequently referred to physiotherapy. Physiotherapy generally involves a multimodal approach to management that may include; exercise, manual therapy and techniques to reduce pain. At present it is not possible to predict which patients will respond positively to physiotherapy treatment. The purpose of this systematic review was to identify which prognostic factors are associated with the outcome of physiotherapy in the management of musculoskeletal shoulder pain.
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Autobiographical Memory: A Clinical Perspective.
Front Behav Neurosci
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
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Autobiographical memory (ABM) comprises memories of ones own past that are characterized by a sense of subjective time and autonoetic awareness. Although ABM deficits are among the primary symptoms of patients with major psychiatric conditions such as mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and Alzheimer Disease (AD) or chronic schizophrenia large clinical studies are scarce. We therefore summarize and discuss the results of our clinical studies on ABM deficits in the respective conditions. In these studies ABM was assessed by using the same instrument - i.e., the Erweitertes Autobiographisches Gedächtnis Inventar (E-AGI) - thus allowing a direct comparison between diagnostic groups. Episodic ABM, especially the richness of details was impaired already in MCI and in beginning AD. Semantic memories were spared until moderate stages, indicating a dissociation between both memory systems. A recency effect was detectable in cognitively unimpaired subjects and vanished in patients with AD. A similar pattern of deficits was found in patients with chronic schizophrenia but not in patients with major depression. These ABM deficits were not accounted for by gender, or education level and did not apply for the physiological ageing process in otherwise healthy elderly. In conclusion, ABM deficits are frequently found in AD and chronic schizophrenia and primarily involve episodic rather than semantic memories. This dissociation corresponds to the multiple trace theory which hypothesized that these memory functions refer to distinct neuronal systems. The semi-structured interview E-AGI used to discern ABM changes provided a sufficient reliability measures, moreover potential effects of a number of important confounders could be falsified so far. These findings underline the relevance of ABM-assessments in clinical practice.
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Phase II trial of dasatinib in patients with metastatic breast cancer using real-time pharmacodynamic tissue biomarkers of Src inhibition to escalate dosing.
Clin. Cancer Res.
PUBLISHED: 08-02-2011
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A phase II study of dasatinib, an inhibitor of multiple oncogenic tyrosine kinases including Src, was conducted to evaluate 16-week progression-free rate and tolerability in patients with previously treated metastatic breast cancer (MBC). Real-time assessment of potential tissue biomarkers of Src inhibition was used to optimize dosing.
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The responsiveness of sensibility and strength tests in patients undergoing carpal tunnel decompression.
BMC Musculoskelet Disord
PUBLISHED: 07-18-2011
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Several clinical measures of sensory and motor function are used alongside patient-rated questionnaires to assess outcomes of carpal tunnel decompression. However there is a lack of evidence regarding which clinical tests are most responsive to clinically important change over time.
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Second primary ipsilateral breast cancer with contralateral axillary involvement: a case report and literature review.
Clin. Breast Cancer
PUBLISHED: 06-23-2011
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After breast-conserving surgery for an initial breast cancer, the incidence of lymphatic drainage to sites other than the ipsilateral axilla, such as the contralateral axilla, increases significantly at the time of a second primary ipsilateral breast cancer. Given the likelihood of altered lymphatic drainage, and in the absence of distant metastatic sites, consideration should be given to treating patients with a second primary ipsilateral breast cancer and contralateral axillary lymph node involvement with curative intent. This clinical issue may become more common as the incidence of second primary ipsilateral breast cancer would be expected to increase due to widespread adoption of breast-conserving surgery, improved prognosis for patients with an initial early-stage breast cancer, and highly sensitive screening modalities such as magnetic resonance imaging.
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Circulating tumor cells from patients with advanced prostate and breast cancer display both epithelial and mesenchymal markers.
Mol. Cancer Res.
PUBLISHED: 06-10-2011
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During cancer progression, malignant cells undergo epithelial-mesenchymal transitions (EMT) and mesenchymal-epithelial transitions (MET) as part of a broad invasion and metastasis program. We previously observed MET events among lung metastases in a preclinical model of prostate adenocarcinoma that suggested a relationship between epithelial plasticity and metastatic spread. We thus sought to translate these findings into clinical evidence by examining the existence of EMT in circulating tumor cells (CTC) from patients with progressive metastatic solid tumors, with a focus on men with castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) and women with metastatic breast cancer. We showed that the majority (> 80%) of these CTCs in patients with metastatic CRPC coexpress epithelial proteins such as epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM), cytokeratins (CK), and E-cadherin, with mesenchymal proteins including vimentin, N-cadherin and O-cadherin, and the stem cell marker CD133. Equally, we found that more than 75% of CTCs from women with metastatic breast cancer coexpress CK, vimentin, and N-cadherin. The existence and high frequency of these CTCs coexpressing epithelial, mesenchymal, and stem cell markers in patients with progressive metastases has important implications for the application and interpretation of approved methods to detect CTCs.
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Lenalidomide-Associated ITP.
Case Rep Hematol
PUBLISHED: 04-27-2011
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Lenalidomide is a potent immunomodulatory agent being used increasingly for treatment of hematologic malignancies including multiple myeloma and myelodysplasia. The common toxicities of lenalidomide, including dose-limiting myelosuppression, are well described. However, the immunomodulatory properties of lenalidomide may give rise to unexpected autoimmune complications. Herein, we describe a case of immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) associated with use of lenalidomide.
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Effect of a high-density foam seating wedge on back pain intensity when used by 14 to 16-year-old school students: a randomised controlled trial.
Physiotherapy
PUBLISHED: 04-19-2011
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No previous randomised controlled trials had been undertaken investigating the effect of school seating on back pain in 14 to 16 year olds. This study was designed to test the effect of the use of a high-density foam wedge on normal school seating on the intensity of back pain.
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Sensory relearning in peripheral nerve disorders of the hand: a web-based survey and delphi consensus method.
J Hand Ther
PUBLISHED: 02-15-2011
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Sensory relearning (SR) first described in the 1970s by Wynn-Parry and Dellon has evolved over the last 20 years as a result of new insights into cortical plasticity. It has eluded precise definition, and a detailed description of its "key ingredients" is rarely documented in published studies investigating effectiveness. The purpose of this two-part study was to define SR and describe the content of an SR program in the treatment of peripheral nerve disorders of the hand. The first part included a review of current published evidence and a survey of clinical practice. The second part comprised a Delphi method to develop consensus on the definition and indicative content of an SR program with a view to evaluating its clinical effectiveness in future trials. The Web-based survey of SR practices among European hand therapists was undertaken first. A total of 70 respondents returned their questionnaires representing 10 European-member countries. Frequencies and percentages were used to summarize the responses. The results confirmed that both classical and novel techniques for SR are being used by hand therapists. Classical methods, such as retraining of tactile gnosis through graded textures, shapes, and objects, were more frequently used than newer methods, such as mirrors or sensory substitution, which have been advocated as part of early-phase retraining and were developed in the last 10 years. An internet-mediated Delphi method with seven experts from four European countries yielded consensus on a definition of SR and its indicative content. Further work is needed to ensure that this can be translated into feasible treatment programs that can be evaluated in future trials.
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A questionnaire-based survey of participants decisions regarding recruitment and retention in a randomised controlled trial - lessons learnt from the SCoRD trial.
Contemp Clin Trials
PUBLISHED: 01-24-2011
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Successful recruitment and retention on trials is critical to ensuring that adequate power is conferred, results are generalisable and trials are completed within the allocated time and resources. Nested within an existing pragmatic randomised controlled trial a process evaluation was conducted to explore the reasons for a much higher than anticipated recruitment (120% of required sample size) and retention rate (96% completed follow-up). A questionnaire was designed to ascertain patients views on reasons affecting consent and retention. 148 patients still enrolled in the trial at their final follow-up were either given or mailed a questionnaire of which 102 were returned (69%). 96% rated the written information as very or somewhat important in their decision to consent. Verbal information given to them by the operating surgeon was considered very or somewhat important by 86% and the relative inconvenience was rated as important by 79% of patients. Reasons for consenting for a large proportion of patents were the wish to help in research which may benefit others in the future and the perception that this was an important and relevant study. There was also some evidence that patients weighed up the demands with the potential benefits to them. High levels of satisfaction were expressed with trial personnel and trial procedures. The inclusion of a trial process evaluation such as the one presented here is an efficient method for gathering information of participants decisions regarding recruitment and retention in a trial and can help to inform the successful planning of future trials.
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Night-time splinting after fasciectomy or dermo-fasciectomy for Dupuytrens contracture: a pragmatic, multi-centre, randomised controlled trial.
BMC Musculoskelet Disord
PUBLISHED: 01-19-2011
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Dupuytrens disease is a progressive fibroproliferative disorder which can result in fixed flexion contractures of digits and impaired hand function. Standard treatment involves surgical release or excision followed by post-operative hand therapy and splinting, however the evidence supporting night splinting is of low quality and equivocal.
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The receptor architecture of the pigeons nidopallium caudolaterale: an avian analogue to the mammalian prefrontal cortex.
Brain Struct Funct
PUBLISHED: 01-12-2011
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The avian nidopallium caudolaterale is a multimodal area in the caudal telencephalon that is apparently not homologous to the mammalian prefrontal cortex but serves comparable functions. Here we analyzed binding-site densities of glutamatergic AMPA, NMDA and kainate receptors, GABAergic GABA(A), muscarinic M(1), M(2) and nicotinic (nACh) receptors, noradrenergic ?(1) and ?(2), serotonergic 5-HT(1A) and dopaminergic D(1)-like receptors using quantitative in vitro receptor autoradiography. We compared the receptor architecture of the pigeons nidopallial structures, in particular the NCL, with cortical areas Fr2 and Cg1 in rats and prefrontal area BA10 in humans. Our results confirmed that the relative ratios of multiple receptor densities across different nidopallial structures (their "receptor fingerprints") were very similar in shape; however, the absolute binding densities (the "size" of the fingerprints) differed significantly. This finding enables a delineation of the avian NCL from surrounding structures and a further parcellation into a medial and a lateral part as revealed by differences in densities of nACh, M(2), kainate, and 5-HT(1A) receptors. Comparisons of the NCL with the rat and human frontal structures showed differences in the receptor distribution, particularly of the glutamate receptors, but also revealed highly conserved features like the identical densities of GABA(A), M(2), nACh and D(1)-like receptors. Assuming a convergent evolution of avian and mammalian prefrontal areas, our results support the hypothesis that specific neurochemical traits provide the molecular background for higher order processes such as executive functions. The differences in glutamate receptor distributions may reflect species-specific adaptations.
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NMDA and D2-like receptors modulate cognitive flexibility in a color discrimination reversal task in pigeons.
Behav. Neurosci.
PUBLISHED: 06-10-2010
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Reversal and extinction learning represent forms of cognitive flexibility that refer to the ability of an animal to alter behavior in response to unanticipated changes on environmental demands. A role for dopamine and glutamate in modulating this behavior has been implicated. Here, we determined the effects of intracerebroventricular injections in pigeons forebrain of the D2-like receptor agonist quinpirole, the D2-like receptor antagonist sulpiride and the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor antagonist AP-5 on initial acquisition and reversal of a color discrimination task. On day one, pigeons had to learn to discriminate two color keys. On day two, pigeons first performed a retention test, which was followed by a reversal of the reward contingencies of the two color keys. None of the drugs altered performance in the initial acquisition of color discrimination or affected the retention of the learned color key. In contrast, all drugs impaired reversal learning by increasing trials and incorrect responses in the reversal session. Our data support the hypothesis that D2-like receptor mechanisms, like N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor modulations, are involved in cognitive flexibility and relearning processes, but not in initial learning of stimulus-reward association.
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Severity of contracture and self-reported disability in patients with Dupuytrens contracture referred for surgery.
J Hand Ther
PUBLISHED: 05-26-2010
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The purpose of the study was to explore the relationship between preoperative flexion contracture (FC) and self-reported disability in patients undergoing surgical release by fasciectomy or dermofasciectomy. The study design used was a prospective observational study: Dupuytrens disease (DD) is a fibroproliferative disorder of the palmar fascia and may lead to functional deficits requiring surgical intervention. Outcomes are usually reported using digital range of motion although recent studies have also included patient-rated outcome measures with the extensively validated Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH) Questionnaire commonly used. One hundred fifty-four patients consecutively enrolled in a prospective randomized trial were assessed before surgery for active range of movement using goniometry and self-reported functioning using DASH questionnaire. The small finger was affected in 69% of patients with a mean FC of 77.8 degrees (standard deviation=43.5°). The mean DASH score was 16 points (range, 0-62). The correlation between severity of FC in all four fingers and DASH was weak (r=0.264, p=0.001). At individual digital level, the correlation between FC and DASH was weak in the index (r=0.26), middle (r=0.28), and ring (r=0.21) fingers but almost absent in the small finger (r=0.07). These results show that the relationship between severity of FC and functional disability measured by the DASH questionnaire appear to be very weak or even absent.
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The reliability of one vs. three trials of pain-free grip strength in subjects with rheumatoid arthritis.
J Hand Ther
PUBLISHED: 02-04-2010
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Measurement Reliability. The purpose of the study was to evaluate the test-retest reliability of one vs. the mean of three trials of pain-free grip strength in participants with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The study used was a repeated-measures, crossover design. Pain-free grip strength was measured with the Biometric E-Link Evaluation System V900S (Unit 25, Nine Mile Point Ind. Est., Gwent UK NP11 7HZ), pain levels recorded before and after grip tests with visual analog scale. High levels of test-retest reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient?0.91) were found for both one trial and the mean of three trials of pain-free grip strength testing. Median values of grip strength for both methods produced comparable results. Clinically small but statistically significant increases in pain (p?0.01) were found. One trial of pain-free grip strength is reliable and may save valuable clinical time while reducing the assessment burden placed on patients with RA.
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Reliable data on 5- and 10-year survival provide accurate estimates of 15-year survival in estrogen receptor-positive early-stage breast cancer.
Breast Cancer Res. Treat.
PUBLISHED: 02-13-2009
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There are few studies of model-based survival projections using early empirical results for estimating long-term survival. Utilizing Early Breast Cancer Trialists Collaborative Group (EBCTCG) data, a Markov model was generated to compare empirical results with those modeled beyond the empirical result time horizon in estrogen receptor (ER)-positive early-stage breast cancer (ESBC). Modeling 15-year survival based on 5- and 10-year EBCTCG data resulted in an average error estimate in breast cancer mortality of 0.75% [range -0.83 to 2.19%]. Although modeling life expectancy differences ranged from an underestimate of -7.93% to an overestimate of 12.64%, over the span of 15 years this corresponded to a loss of 18 days or a gain of 40 days of life. Reliable early survival data may be used to generate models that accurately estimate 15-year survival in ER-positive ESBC. Whether early survival data can be employed over the lifetime horizon remains to be demonstrated.
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Hippocampal volume reduction and autobiographical memory deficits in chronic schizophrenia.
Psychiatry Res
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Although autobiographical memory (AM) deficits and hippocampal changes are frequently found in schizophrenia, their actual association remained yet to be established. AM performance and hippocampal volume were examined in 33 older, chronic schizophrenic patients and 21 healthy volunteers matched for age, gender and education. Psychopathological symptoms and additional neuropsychological parameters were assessed by using appropriate rating scales; magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) 3-T data were analyzed via an automated region-of-interest procedure. When compared with the control subjects, patients showed significantly decreased left anterior and posterior hippocampal volumes. Episodic but not semantic AM performance was significantly lower in the patients than in the healthy controls. Both episodic and semantic AM deficits were significantly correlated with volume of the left hippocampus in the patient group. In contrast, deficits in verbal memory, working memory and remote semantic memory observed in the patients did not relate to hippocampal volume. Our findings indicate that AM deficits in chronic schizophrenia are associated with hippocampal volume reductions and underline the importance of this pathology in schizophrenia.
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Sensory relearning after surgical treatment for carpal tunnel syndrome: a pilot clinical trial.
Muscle Nerve
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Surgical treatment for carpal tunnel syndrome does not always alleviate sensory deficits, especially in patients with severe disease. No proven treatment is currently available for these patients.
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Effects of sensory reeducation programs on functional hand sensibility after median and ulnar repair: a systematic review.
J Hand Ther
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This is the first systematic review looking at the effectiveness of sensory re-education programmes on functional sensibility which focuses purely on clinical trials of adult patients with median and ulnar nerve injuries.
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Reduced gray to white matter tissue intensity contrast in schizophrenia.
PLoS ONE
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While numerous structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies revealed changes of brain volume or density, cortical thickness and fibre integrity in schizophrenia, the effect of tissue alterations on the contrast properties of neural structures has so far remained mostly unexplored.
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Plasticity in D1-like receptor expression is associated with different components of cognitive processes.
PLoS ONE
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Dopamine D1-like receptors consist of D1 (D1A) and D5 (D1B) receptors and play a key role in working memory. However, their possibly differential contribution to working memory is unclear. We combined a working memory training protocol with a stepwise increase of cognitive subcomponents and real-time RT-PCR analysis of dopamine receptor expression in pigeons to identify molecular changes that accompany training of isolated cognitive subfunctions. In birds, the D1-like receptor family is extended and consists of the D1A, D1B, and D1D receptors. Our data show that D1B receptor plasticity follows a training that includes active mental maintenance of information, whereas D1A and D1D receptor plasticity in addition accompanies learning of stimulus-response associations. Plasticity of D1-like receptors plays no role for processes like response selection and stimulus discrimination. None of the tasks altered D2 receptor expression. Our study shows that different cognitive components of working memory training have distinguishable effects on D1-like receptor expression.
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Diagnostic accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance arthrography for triangular fibrocartilaginous complex injury: a systematic review and meta-analysis.
J Bone Joint Surg Am
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Triangular fibrocartilaginous complex (TFCC) tears are common sources of ulnar-sided wrist pain and resultant functional disability. Diagnosis is based on the history and clinical examination as well as radiographic evidence of a TFCC central perforation or a radial/ulnar tear. The purpose of this study was therefore to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetic resonance arthrography (MRA) in the detection of TFCC injury in the adult population.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

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We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.