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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Randomized controlled trial to evaluate the effects of combined progressive exercise on metabolic syndrome in breast cancer survivors: rationale, design, and methods.
BMC Cancer
PUBLISHED: 03-21-2014
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Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is increasingly present in breast cancer survivors, possibly worsened by cancer-related treatments, such as chemotherapy. MetS greatly increases risk of cardiovascular disease and diabetes, co-morbidities that could impair the survivorship experience, and possibly lead to cancer recurrence. Exercise has been shown to positively influence quality of life (QOL), physical function, muscular strength and endurance, reduce fatigue, and improve emotional well-being; however, the impact on MetS components (visceral adiposity, hyperglycemia, low serum high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, hypertriglyceridemia, and hypertension) remains largely unknown. In this trial, we aim to assess the effects of combined (aerobic and resistance) exercise on components of MetS, as well as on physical fitness and QOL, in breast cancer survivors soon after completing cancer-related treatments.
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Validation and feasibility of a caloric expenditure measuring device in women with early-stage breast cancer.
Support Care Cancer
PUBLISHED: 03-09-2014
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The purpose of this study is to validate the Bodybugg (BB), a caloric expenditure measuring device, in breast cancer patients undergoing adjuvant and neoadjuvant chemotherapy for early-stage breast cancer.
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Increased long-term recreational physical activity is associated with older age at natural menopause among heavy smokers: the California Teachers Study.
Menopause
PUBLISHED: 02-26-2013
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Although physical activity modulates the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis, the few studies that have investigated whether physical activity is associated with age at natural menopause have yielded mixed results. We set out to determine whether physical activity is associated with the timing of natural menopause in a large cohort of California women overall and by smoking history.
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Value of measuring muscle performance to assess changes in lean mass with testosterone and growth hormone supplementation.
Eur. J. Appl. Physiol.
PUBLISHED: 01-25-2011
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We hypothesized that treatment with testosterone (T) and recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) would increase lean mass (LM) and muscle strength proportionally and an in a linear manner over 16 weeks. This was a multicenter, randomized, controlled, double-masked investigation of T and rhGH supplementation in older (71 ± 4 years) community-dwelling men. Participants received transdermal T at either 5 or 10 g/day as well as rhGH at 0, 3.0 or 5.0 ?g/kg/day for 16 weeks. Body composition was determined by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) and muscle performance by composite one-repetition maximum (1-RM) strength and strength per unit of lean mass (muscle quality, MQ) for five major muscle groups (upper and lower body) at baseline, week 8 and 17. The average change in total LM at study week 8 compared with baseline was 1.50 ± 1.54 kg (P < 0.0001) in the T only group and 2.64 ± 1.7 (P < 0.0001) in the T + rhGH group and at week 17 was 1.46 ± 1.48 kg (P < 0.0001) in the T only group and 2.14 ± 1.96 kg (P < 0.0001) in the T + rhGH group. 1-RM strength improved modestly in both groups combined (12.0 ± 23.9%, P < 0.0001) at week 8 but at week 17 these changes were twofold greater (24.7 ± 31.0%, P < 0.0001). MQ did not significantly change from baseline to week 8 but increased for the entire cohort, T only, and T + rhGH groups by week 17 (P < 0.001). Despite sizeable increases in LM measurements at week 8, tests of muscle performance did not show substantive improvements at this time point.
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Does hormone therapy counter the beneficial effects of physical activity on breast cancer risk in postmenopausal women?
Cancer Causes Control
PUBLISHED: 01-07-2011
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Studies consistently demonstrate that physical activity is inversely associated with postmenopausal breast cancer. Whether this association is stronger among non-hormone users or former users of menopausal hormone therapy (HT) is of interest given the marked decline in HT use since 2002. The Womens Contraceptive and Reproductive Experiences Study, a population-based case-control study of invasive breast cancer, recruited white women and black women ages 35-64 years and collected histories of lifetime recreational physical activity and HT use including estrogen-alone therapy (ET) and estrogen plus progestin therapy (EPT). Among postmenopausal women (1,908 cases, 2,013 control participants), breast cancer risk declined with increasing levels of lifetime physical activity among never HT users; among short-term HT users (fewer than 5 years); and among current ET users; P (trend) values ranged from 0.004 to 0.016. In contrast, physical activity had no significant association with risk among long-term and past HT users and among current EPT users. No statistical evidence of heterogeneity was demonstrated for duration or currency of HT use. Breast cancer risk decreases with increasing lifetime physical activity levels among postmenopausal women who have not used HT, have used HT for less than 5 years, or are current ET users, yet this study was unable to demonstrate statistically that HT use modifies the relationship between physical activity and breast cancer. With profound changes in HT use occurring since 2002, it will be important in future studies to learn whether or not any association between physical activity and breast cancer among former HT users is a function of time since last HT use.
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The Stayhealthy bioelectrical impedance analyzer predicts body fat in children and adults.
Nutr Res
PUBLISHED: 03-05-2010
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Bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) is a time-efficient and cost-effective method for estimating body composition. We hypothesized that there would be no significant difference between the Stayhealthy BC1 BIA and the selected reference methods when determining body composition. Thus, the purpose of the present study was to determine the validity of estimating percent body fat (%BF) using the Stayhealthy BIA with its most recently updated algorithms compared to the reference methods of dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry for adults and hydrostatic weighing for children. We measured %BF in 245 adults aged 18 to 80 years and 115 children aged 10 to 17 years. Body fat by BIA was determined using a single 50 kHz frequency handheld impedance device and proprietary software. Agreement between BIA and reference methods was assessed by Bland and Altman plots. Bland and Altman analysis for men, women, and children revealed good agreement between the reference methods and BIA. There was no significant difference by t tests between mean %BF by BIA for men, women, or children when compared to the respective reference method. Significant correlation values between BIA, and reference methods for all men, women, and children were 0.85, 0.88, and 0.79, respectively. Reliability (test-retest) was assessed by intraclass correlation coefficient and coefficient of variation. Intraclass correlation coefficient values were greater than 0.99 (P < .001) for men, women, and children with coefficient of variation values 3.3%, 1.8%, and 1.7%, respectively. The Stayhealthy BIA device demonstrated good agreement between reference methods using Bland and Altman analyses.
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Hormone replacement therapy and messenger RNA expression of estrogen receptor coregulators after exercise in postmenopausal women.
Med Sci Sports Exerc
PUBLISHED: 02-19-2010
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The use of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) is a potential treatment to relieve symptoms of menopause in postmenopausal women; however, the effects on skeletal muscle are unclear. Specifically, it is unknown if HRT enhances estrogen receptor (ER) transcriptional activation in skeletal muscle at rest and after resistance exercise.
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Exercise does not influence myostatin and follistatin messenger RNA expression in young women.
J Strength Cond Res
PUBLISHED: 02-04-2010
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We evaluated changes in myostatin, follistatin, and MyoD messenger RNA (mRNA) gene expression using eccentric exercise (EE) and concentric exercise (CE) as probes to better understand the mechanisms of muscle hypertrophy in young women. Twelve women performed single-leg maximal eccentric (n = 6, 25 +/- 1 years, 59 +/- 7 kg) or concentric (n = 6, 24 +/- 1 years, 65 +/- 7 kg) isokinetic knee extension exercise for 7 sessions. Muscle biopsies were taken from the vastus lateralis at baseline, 8 hours after the first exercise session, and 8 hours after the seventh exercise session. In the EE group, there were no changes in myostatin and follistatin (p > or = 0.17); however, MyoD expression increased after 1 exercise bout (p = 0.02). In the CE group, there were no changes in myostatin, follistatin, or MyoD mRNA gene expression (p > or = 0.07). Differences between the EE and CE groups were not significant (p > or = 0.05). These data suggest that a single bout or multiple bouts of maximal EE or CE may not significantly alter myostatin or follistatin mRNA gene expression in young women. However, MyoD mRNA expression seems to increase only after EE.
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Influence of hormone replacement therapy on eccentric exercise induced myogenic gene expression in postmenopausal women.
J. Appl. Physiol.
PUBLISHED: 08-20-2009
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Hormone replacement therapy (HRT) is used in postmenopausal women to relieve symptoms of menopause and prevent osteoporosis. We sought to evaluate changes in mRNA expression of key myogenic factors in postmenopausal women taking and not taking HRT following a high-intensity eccentric resistance exercise. Fourteen postmenopausal women were studied and included 6 control women not using HRT (59 +/- 4 years, 63 +/- 17 kg) and 8 women using traditional HRT (59 +/- 4 yr, 89 +/- 24 kg). Both groups performed 10 sets of 10 maximal eccentric repetitions of single-leg extension on a Cybex dynamometer at 60 degrees /s. Muscle biopsies of the vastus lateralis were obtained from the exercised leg at baseline and 4 h after the exercise bout. Gene expression was determined using RT-PCR for follistatin, forkhead box 3A (FOXO3A), muscle atrophy F-box (MAFbx), muscle ring finger-1 (MuRF-1), myogenic differentiation factor (MyoD), myogenin, myostatin, myogenic factor 5 (Myf5), and muscle regulatory factor 4 (MRF4). At rest, the HRT group expressed higher levels of MyoD, myogenin, Myf5, MRF4, and follistatin (P < 0.05). In response to eccentric exercise, follistatin, MyoD, myogenin, Myf5, and MRF4 were significantly increased (P
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Hormone therapy attenuates exercise-induced skeletal muscle damage in postmenopausal women.
J. Appl. Physiol.
PUBLISHED: 07-02-2009
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Hormone therapy (HT) is a potential treatment to relieve symptoms of menopause and prevent the onset of disease such as osteoporosis in postmenopausal women. We evaluated changes in markers of exercise-induced skeletal muscle damage and inflammation [serum creatine kinase (CK), serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), and skeletal muscle mRNA expression of IL-6, IL-8, IL-15, and TNF-alpha] in postmenopausal women after a high-intensity resistance exercise bout. Fourteen postmenopausal women were divided into two groups: women not using HT (control; n = 6, 59 +/- 4 yr, 63 +/- 17 kg) and women using traditional HT (HT; n = 8, 59 +/- 4 yr, 89 +/- 24 kg). Both groups performed 10 sets of 10 maximal eccentric repetitions of single-leg extension on the Cybex dynamometer at 60 degrees /s with 20-s rest periods between sets. Muscle biopsies of the vastus lateralis were obtained from the exercised leg at baseline and 4 h after the exercise bout. Gene expression was determined by RT-PCR for IL-6, IL-8, IL-15, and TNF-alpha. Blood draws were performed at baseline and 3 days after exercise to measure CK and LDH. Independent t-tests were performed to test group differences (control vs. HT). A probability level of P
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Validation of the CardioCoachCO2 for submaximal and maximal metabolic exercise testing.
J Strength Cond Res
PUBLISHED: 06-17-2009
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This study examined the validity of the CardioCoachCO2 metabolic system to measure oxygen capacity by comparison to a previously validated device. Fourteen subjects (8 men and 6 women; 25.9 +/- 6.6 years of age) completed 2 maximal graded exercise tests on a cycle ergometer. Subjects were randomly tested on the CardioCoachCO2 and Medical Graphics CardiO2/CP (MedGraphics) system on 2 separate visits. The exercise test included 3 submaximal 3-minute stages (50, 75, and 100 W for women; 50, 100, and 150 W for men) followed by incremental, 25 W, 1-minute stages until volitional fatigue (Vo2max). There was no significant difference between the CardioCoachCO2 and MedGraphics except at the 100 W stage (22.4 +/- 4.8 and 20.3 +/- 3.7 ml x kg(-1) x min(-1), p = 0.048, respectively). Spearman correlations demonstrated a strong correlation between the 2 devices at maximal Vo2 (R = 0.94). Bland-Altman plots demonstrated small limits of agreement, indicating that the 2 devices are similar in measuring oxygen consumption. This study indicates that the CardioCoachCO2 is a valid device for testing Vo2 at submaximal and maximal levels. Validation of this device supports the CardioCoachCO2 as a feasible and convenient method for testing participants and may be useful in the field or clinic.
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Hormone therapy and maximal eccentric exercise alters myostatin-related gene expression in postmenopausal women.
J Strength Cond Res
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We sought to evaluate baseline mRNA values and changes in gene expression of myostatin-related factors in postmenopausal women taking hormone therapy (HT) and not taking HT after eccentric exercise. Fourteen postmenopausal women participated including 6 controls not using HT (59 ± 4 years, 63 ± 17 kg) and 8 women using HT (59 ± 4 years, 89 ± 24 kg). The participants performed 10 sets of 10 maximal eccentric repetitions of single-leg extension on a dynamometer. Muscle biopsies from the vastus lateralis were obtained from the exercised leg at baseline and 4 hours after the exercise bout. Gene expression was determined using reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction for myostatin, activin receptor IIb (ActRIIb), follistatin, follistatin-related gene (FLRG), follistatin-like-3 (FSTL3), and GDF serum-associated protein-1 (GASP-1). In response to the exercise bout, myostatin and ActRIIb significantly decreased (p < 0.05), and follistatin, FLRG, FSTL3, and GASP-1 significantly increased in both groups (p < 0.05). Significantly greater changes in gene expression of all genes occurred in the HT group than in the control group after the acute eccentric exercise bout (p < 0.05). These data suggest that postmenopausal women using HT express greater myostatin-related gene expression, which may reflect a mechanism by which estrogen influences the preservation of muscle mass. Further, postmenopausal women using HT experienced a profoundly greater myostatin-related response to maximal eccentric exercise.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.