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Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Reduced cerebral blood flow with orthostasis precedes hypocapnic hyperpnea, sympathetic activation, and postural tachycardia syndrome.
Hypertension
PUBLISHED: 04-07-2014
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Hyperventilation and reduced cerebral blood flow velocity can occur in postural tachycardia syndrome (POTS). We studied orthostatically intolerant patients, with suspected POTS, with a chief complaint of upright dyspnea. On the basis of our observations of an immediate reduction of cerebral blood flow velocity with orthostasis, we hypothesize that the resulting ischemic hypoxia of the carotid body causes chemoreflex activation, hypocapnic hyperpnea, sympathetic activation, and increased heart rate and blood pressure in this subset of POTS. We compared 11 dyspneic POTS subjects with 10 healthy controls during a 70° head-up tilt. In POTS subjects during initial orthostasis before blood pressure recovery; central blood volume and mean arterial pressure were reduced (P<0.025), resulting in a significant (P<0.001) decrease in cerebral blood flow velocity, which temporally preceded (17±6 s; P<0.025) a progressive increase in minute ventilation and decrease in end tidal CO2 (P<0.05) when compared with controls. Sympathoexcitation, measured by muscle sympathetic nerve activity, was increased in POTS (P<0.01) and inversely proportional to end tidal CO2 and resulted in an increase in heart rate (P<0.001), total peripheral resistance (P<0.025), and a decrease in cardiac output (P<0.025). The decrease in cerebral blood flow velocity and mean arterial pressure during initial orthostasis was greater (P<0.025) in POTS. Our data suggest that exaggerated initial central hypovolemia during initial orthostatic hypotension in POTS results in reduced cerebral blood flow velocity and postural hypocapnic hyperpnea that perpetuates cerebral ischemia. We hypothesize that sustained hypocapnia and cerebral ischemia produce sympathoexcitation, tachycardia, and a statistically significant increase in blood pressure.
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Design and implementation of practical bidirectional texture function measurement devices focusing on the developments at the University of Bonn.
Sensors (Basel)
PUBLISHED: 01-03-2014
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Understanding as well as realistic reproduction of the appearance of materials play an important role in computer graphics, computer vision and industry. They enable applications such as digital material design, virtual prototyping and faithful virtual surrogates for entertainment, marketing, education or cultural heritage documentation. A particularly fruitful way to obtain the digital appearance is the acquisition of reflectance from real-world material samples. Therefore, a great variety of devices to perform this task has been proposed. In this work, we investigate their practical usefulness. We first identify a set of necessary attributes and establish a general categorization of different designs that have been realized. Subsequently, we provide an in-depth discussion of three particular implementations by our work group, demonstrating advantages and disadvantages of different system designs with respect to the previously established attributes. Finally, we survey the existing literature to compare our implementation with related approaches.
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Interaction of photoperiod and vernalization determine flowering time of Brachypodium distachyon.
Plant Physiol.
PUBLISHED: 12-19-2013
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Timing of flowering is key to the reproductive success of many plants. In temperate climates, flowering is often coordinated with seasonal environmental cues such as temperature and photoperiod. Vernalization is an example of temperature influencing the timing of flowering and is defined as the process by which a prolonged exposure to the cold of winter results in competence to flower during the following spring. In cereals, three genes (VRN1, VRN2 and FT) have been identified that influence the vernalization requirement and are thought to form a regulatory loop to control the timing of flowering. Here, we characterize natural variation in the vernalization and photoperiod responses in Brachypodium distachyon, a small temperate grass related to wheat and barley. Brachypodium accessions display a wide range of flowering responses to different photoperiods and lengths of vernalization. In addition, we characterize the expression patterns of the closest homologs of VRN1, VRN2 (BdVRN2L) and FT before, during, and after cold exposure as well as in different photoperiods. FT mRNA levels generally correlate with flowering time among accessions grown in different photoperiods, and FT is more highly expressed in vernalized plants after cold. VRN1 is induced by cold in leaves and remains high following vernalization. Plants overexpressing VRN1 or FT flower rapidly in the absence of vernalization and plants overexpressing VRN1 exhibit lower BdVRN2L levels. Interestingly, BdVRN2L is induced during cold, which is a difference in the behavior of BdVRN2L compared to wheat VRN2 during cold.
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Disruption of phase synchronization between blood pressure and muscle sympathetic nerve activity in postural vasovagal syncope.
Am. J. Physiol. Heart Circ. Physiol.
PUBLISHED: 08-09-2013
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Withdrawal of muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) may not be necessary for the precipitous fall of peripheral arterial resistance and arterial pressure (AP) during vasovagal syncope (VVS). We tested the hypothesis that the MSNA-AP baroreflex entrainment is disrupted before VVS regardless of MSNA withdrawal using the phase synchronization between blood pressure and MSNA during head-up tilt (HUT) to measure reflex coupling. We studied eight VVS subjects and eight healthy control subjects. Heart rate, AP, and MSNA were measured during supine baseline and at early, mid, late, and syncope stages of HUT. Phase synchronization indexes, measuring time-dependent differences between MSNA and AP phases, were computed. Directionality indexes, indicating the influence of AP on MSNA (neural arc) and MSNA on AP (peripheral arc), were computed. Heart rate was greater in VVS compared with control subjects during early, mid, and late stages of HUT and significantly declined at syncope (P = 0.04). AP significantly decreased during mid, late, and syncope stages of tilt in VVS subjects only (P = 0.001). MSNA was not significantly different between groups during HUT (P = 0.700). However, the phase synchronization index significantly decreased during mid and late stages in VVS subjects but not in control subjects (P < .001). In addition, the neural arc was significantly affected more than the peripheral arc before syncope. In conclusion, VVS is accompanied by a loss of the synchronous AP-MSNA relationship with or without a loss in MSNA at faint. This provides insight into the mechanisms behind the loss of vasoconstriction and drop in AP independent of MSNA at the time of vasovagal faint.
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The neural interaction between the arterial baroreflex and muscle metaboreflex is preserved in older men.
Exp. Physiol.
PUBLISHED: 06-03-2013
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Sympathetic baroreflex sensitivity is increased during selective activation of the skeletal muscle metaboreflex with postexercise ischaemia (PEI) in young adults. However, to date, there are no data demonstrating this neural interaction between the arterial baroreflex and the muscle metaboreflex in healthy older adults. Therefore, the goal of the present study was to examine the influence of healthy ageing on the metabolic component of the exercise pressor reflex and its interaction with the arterial baroreflex in the control of sympathetic outflow. Postexercise ischaemia following static hand grip performed at 30% maximal voluntary contraction was used to isolate muscle metaboreflex activation in young [n = 10; 24 ± 1 years old; resting blood pressure (BP) 116 ± 3/64 ± 3 mmHg] and older men (n = 9; 59 ± 2 years old; resting BP 120 ± 2/77 ± 2 mmHg). Arterial BP (Finometer) and muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) were measured continuously. Weighted linear regression analysis between MSNA and diastolic BP was used to estimate arterial baroreflex MSNA gain. There were no age-related differences in the increase in mean BP (young, ?14 ± 3 mmHg versus older, ?15 ± 2 mmHg; P > 0.05) or MSNA burst frequency (young, ?11 ± 2 bursts min(-1)?versus older, ?9 ± 1 bursts min(-1); P > 0.05) during PEI. Likewise, the gain of arterial baroreflex control of total MSNA increased to a similar extent in both groups during PEI (young, -4.2 ± 0.9 baseline versus -6.3 ± 1.1 PEI a.u. beat(-1) mmHg(-1); and older, -3.7 ± 1.1 baseline versus -6.7 ± 1.4 PEI a.u. beat(-1) mmHg(-1); P < 0.05 for both). Collectively, these findings indicate that the neural interaction between the arterial baroreflex and the skeletal muscle metaboreflex in the regulation of MSNA is preserved in healthy ageing.
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Spontaneous fluctuation indices of the cardiovagal baroreflex accurately measure the baroreflex sensitivity at the operating point during upright tilt.
Am. J. Physiol. Regul. Integr. Comp. Physiol.
PUBLISHED: 04-10-2013
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Spontaneous fluctuation indices of cardiovagal baroreflex have been suggested to be inaccurate measures of baroreflex function during orthostatic stress compared with alternate open-loop methods (e.g. neck pressure/suction, modified Oxford method). We therefore tested the hypothesis that spontaneous fluctuation measurements accurately reflect local baroreflex gain (slope) at the operating point measured by the modified Oxford method, and that apparent differences between these two techniques during orthostasis can be explained by a resetting of the baroreflex function curve. We computed the sigmoidal baroreflex function curves supine and during 70° tilt in 12 young, healthy individuals. With the use of the modified Oxford method, slopes (gains) of supine and upright curves were computed at their maxima (Gmax) and operating points. These were compared with measurements of spontaneous indices in both positions. Supine spontaneous analyses of operating point slope were similar to calculated Gmax of the modified Oxford curve. In contrast, upright operating point was distant from the centering point of the reset curve and fell on the nonlinear portion of the curve. Whereas spontaneous fluctuation measurements were commensurate with the calculated slope of the upright modified Oxford curve at the operating point, they were significantly lower than Gmax. In conclusion, spontaneous measurements of cardiovagal baroreflex function accurately estimate the slope near operating points in both supine and upright position.
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Middle cerebral O? delivery during the modified Oxford maneuver increases with sodium nitroprusside and decreases during phenylephrine.
Am. J. Physiol. Heart Circ. Physiol.
PUBLISHED: 04-05-2013
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The modified Oxford maneuver is the reference standard for assessing arterial baroreflex function. The maneuver comprises a systemic bolus injection of 100 ?g sodium nitroprusside (SNP) followed by 150 ?g phenylephrine (PE). On the one hand, this results in an increase in oxyhemoglobin and total hemoglobin followed by a decrease within the cerebral sample volume illuminated by near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). On the other hand, it produces a decrease in cerebral blood flow velocity (CBFv) within the middle cerebral artery (MCA) during SNP and an increase in CBFv during PE as measured by transcranial Doppler ultrasound. To resolve this apparent discrepancy, we hypothesized that SNP dilates, whereas PE constricts, the MCA. We combined transcranial Doppler ultrasound of the right MCA with NIRS illuminating the right frontal cortex in 12 supine healthy subjects 18-24 yr old. Assuming constant O? consumption and venous saturation, as estimated by partial venous occlusion plethysmography, we used conservation of mass (continuity) equations to estimate the changes in arterial inflow (?Qa) and venous outflow (?Qv) of the NIRS-illuminated area. Oxyhemoglobin and total hemoglobin, respectively, increased by 13.6 ± 1.6 and 15.2 ± 1.4 ?mol/kg brain tissue with SNP despite hypotension and decreased by 6 ± 1 and 7 ± 1 ?mol/kg with PE despite hypertension. SNP increased ?Qa by 0.36 ± .03 ?mol·kg(-1)·s(-1) (21.6 ?mol·kg(-1)·min(-1)), whereas CBFv decreased from 71 ± 2 to 62 ± 2 cm/s. PE decreased ?Qa by 0.27 ± .2 ?mol·kg(-1)·s(-1) (16.2 ?mol·kg(-1)·min(-1)), whereas CBFv increased to 75 ± 3 cm/s. These results are consistent with dilation of the MCA by SNP and constriction by PE.
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Fish oil and neurovascular reactivity to mental stress in humans.
Am. J. Physiol. Regul. Integr. Comp. Physiol.
PUBLISHED: 02-13-2013
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Omega-3 fatty acids found in fish oil have been suggested to protect against cardiovascular disease, yet underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Despite the well-documented link between mental stress and cardiovascular risk, no study has examined neural cardiovascular reactivity to mental stress after fish oil supplementation. We hypothesized that fish oil would blunt the blood pressure, heart rate (HR), and muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) responsiveness to mental stress and/or augment limb vasodilation associated with mental stress. Blood pressure, HR, MSNA, forearm vascular conductance (FVC), and calf vascular conductance (CVC) responses were recorded during a 5-min mental stress protocol in 67 nonhypertensive subjects before and after 8 wk of fish oil (n = 34) or placebo supplementation (n = 33). Fish oil blunted HR reactivity to mental stress (group × condition × time interactions, P = 0.012) but did not alter blood pressure reactivity to mental stress (interactions, P > 0.05). Fish oil blunted total MSNA reactivity to mental stress (interaction, P = 0.039) but did not alter MSNA burst frequency and burst incidence reactivity (interactions, P > 0.05). Finally, fish oil significantly blunted CVC reactivity to mental stress (interaction, P = 0.013) but did not alter FVC reactivity (interaction, P > 0.05). In conclusion, 8 wk of fish oil supplementation significantly attenuated both HR and total MSNA reactivity to mental stress and elicited a paradoxical blunting of calf vascular conductance. These findings support and extend the growing evidence that fish oil may have positive health benefits regarding neural cardiovascular control in humans.
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Nitrogen recycling and flowering time in perennial bioenergy crops.
Front Plant Sci
PUBLISHED: 01-01-2013
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Perennials have a number of traits important for profitability and sustainability of a biofuel crop. Perennialism is generally defined as the ability to grow and reproduce in multiple years. In temperate climates, many perennial plants enter dormancy during winter and recycle nutrients, such as nitrogen, to below ground structures for the next growing season. Nitrogen is expensive to produce and application of nitrogen increases the potent greenhouse gas NO x . Perennial bioenergy crops have been evaluated for biomass yields with nitrogen fertilization, location, year, and genotype as variables. Flowering time and dormancy are closely related to the N recycling program. Substantial variation for flowering time and dormancy has been identified in the switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) species, which provides a source to identify the genetic components of N recycling, and for use in breeding programs. Some studies have addressed recycling specifically, but flowering time and developmental differences were largely ignored, complicating interpretation of the results. Future studies on recycling need to appreciate plant developmental stage to allow comparison between experiments. A perennial/annual model(s) and more environmentally controlled experiments would be useful to determine the genetic components of nitrogen recycling. Increasing biomass yield per unit of nitrogen by maximizing recycling might mean the difference for profitability of a biofuel crop and has the added benefit of minimizing negative environmental effects from agriculture.
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Neurovascular responses to mental stress in prehypertensive humans.
J. Appl. Physiol.
PUBLISHED: 11-04-2010
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Neurovascular responses to mental stress have been linked to several cardiovascular diseases, including hypertension. Mean arterial pressure (MAP), muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA), and forearm vascular responses to mental stress are well documented in normotensive (NT) subjects, but responses in prehypertensive (PHT) subjects remain unclear. We tested the hypothesis that PHT would elicit a more dramatic increase of MAP during mental stress via augmented MSNA and blunted forearm vascular conductance (FVC). We examined 17 PHT (systolic 120-139 and/or diastolic 80-89 mmHg; 22 ± 1 yr) and 18 NT (systolic < 120 and diastolic < 80 mmHg; 23 ± 2 yr) subjects. Heart rate, MAP, MSNA, FVC, and calf vascular conductance were measured during 5 min of baseline and 5 min of mental stress (mental arithmetic). Mental stress increased MAP and FVC in both groups, but the increases in MAP were augmented (? 10 ± 1 vs. ?14 ± 1 mmHg; P < 0.05), and the increases in FVC were blunted (?95 ± 14 vs. ?37 ± 8%; P < 0.001) in PHT subjects. Mental stress elicited similar increases in MSNA (?7 ± 2 vs. ?6 ± 2 bursts/min), heart rate (?21 ± 3 vs. ?18 ± 3 beats/min), and calf vascular conductance (?29 ± 10 vs. ?19 ± 5%) in NT and PHT subjects, respectively. In conclusion, mental stress elicits an augmented pressor response in PHT subjects. This augmentation appears to be associated with altered forearm vascular, but not MSNA, responses to mental stress.
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Phenylmethimazole blocks palmitate-mediated induction of inflammatory cytokine pathways in 3T3L1 adipocytes and RAW 264.7 macrophages.
J. Endocrinol.
PUBLISHED: 09-02-2010
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Visceral adipocytes and associated macrophages produce and release excessive amounts of biologically active inflammatory cytokines via the portal and systemic vascular system, which induce insulin resistance in insulin target tissues such as fat, liver, and muscle. Free fatty acids (FFAs) absorbed via the portal system or released from adipocytes also induce insulin resistance. In this report, we show that phenylmethimazole (C10) blocks basal IL6 and leptin production as well as basal Socs-3 expression in fully differentiated 3T3L1 cells (3T3L1 adipocytes) without affecting insulin-stimulated AKT signaling. In addition, C10 inhibits palmitate-induced IL6 and iNos up-regulation in both 3T3L1 adipocytes and RAW 264.7 macrophages, LPS-induced NF-?B and IFN-? activation in 3T3L1 cells, and LPS-induced iNos, Ifn-?, Il1?, Cxcl10, and Il6 expression in RAW 264.7 macrophages. C10 also blocks palmitate-induced Socs-3 up-regulation and insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1) serine 307 phosphorylation in 3T3L1 adipocytes. Additionally, we show for the first time that although palmitate increases IRS-1 serine 307 phosphorylation in 3T3L1 adipocytes, AKT serine 473 phosphorylation is enhanced, not reduced, by palmitate. These results suggest that through inhibition of FFA-mediated signaling in adipocytes and associated macrophages, as well as possibly other insulin target cells/tissues (i.e. non-immune cells), C10 might be efficacious to prevent or reverse cytokine-induced insulin resistance seen in obesity-related insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes mellitus.
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Natural allelic variation underlying a major fitness trade-off in Arabidopsis thaliana.
Nature
PUBLISHED: 04-14-2010
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Plants can defend themselves against a wide array of enemies, from microbes to large animals, yet there is great variability in the effectiveness of such defences, both within and between species. Some of this variation can be explained by conflicting pressures from pathogens with different modes of attack. A second explanation comes from an evolutionary tug of war, in which pathogens adapt to evade detection, until the plant has evolved new recognition capabilities for pathogen invasion. If selection is, however, sufficiently strong, susceptible hosts should remain rare. That this is not the case is best explained by costs incurred from constitutive defences in a pest-free environment. Using a combination of forward genetics and genome-wide association analyses, we demonstrate that allelic diversity at a single locus, ACCELERATED CELL DEATH 6 (ACD6), underpins marked pleiotropic differences in both vegetative growth and resistance to microbial infection and herbivory among natural Arabidopsis thaliana strains. A hyperactive ACD6 allele, compared to the reference allele, strongly enhances resistance to a broad range of pathogens from different phyla, but at the same time slows the production of new leaves and greatly reduces the biomass of mature leaves. This allele segregates at intermediate frequency both throughout the worldwide range of A. thaliana and within local populations, consistent with this allele providing substantial fitness benefits despite its marked impact on growth.
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Effects of oral contraceptives on sympathetic nerve activity during orthostatic stress in young, healthy women.
Am. J. Physiol. Regul. Integr. Comp. Physiol.
PUBLISHED: 10-14-2009
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Recent studies report that the menstrual cycle alters sympathetic neural responses to orthostatic stress in young, eumenorrheic women. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether oral contraceptives (OC) influence sympathetic neural activation during an orthostatic challenge. Based on evidence that sympathetic baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) is increased during the "low hormone" (LH) phase (i.e., placebo pills) in women taking OC, we hypothesized an augmented muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) response to orthostatic stress during the LH phase. MSNA, mean arterial pressure (MAP), and heart rate (HR) were recorded during progressive lower body negative pressure (LBNP; -5, -10, -15, -20, -30, -40 mmHg; 3 min/stage) in 12 healthy women taking OC (age 22 +/- 1 years). Sympathetic BRS was assessed by examining relations between spontaneous fluctuations of diastolic arterial pressure and MSNA. Subjects were examined twice: once during LH phase and once approximately 3 wk after LH during the "high hormone" phase (randomized order). Resting MSNA (10 +/- 2 vs. 13 +/- 2 bursts/min), MAP (85 +/- 3 vs. 84 +/- 3 mmHg), and HR (62 +/- 2 vs. 65 +/- 3 beats/min) were not different between phases. MSNA and HR increased during progressive LBNP (P < 0.001), and these increases were similar between phases. Progressive LBNP did not change MAP during either phase. Sympathetic BRS increased during progressive LBNP, but these responses were not different between LH and high hormone phases. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that OCs do not alter cardiovascular and sympathetic neural responses to an orthostatic challenge in young, healthy women.
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Cis-regulatory changes at FLOWERING LOCUS T mediate natural variation in flowering responses of Arabidopsis thaliana.
Genetics
PUBLISHED: 08-03-2009
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Flowering time, a critical adaptive trait, is modulated by several environmental cues. These external signals converge on a small set of genes that in turn mediate the flowering response. Mutant analysis and subsequent molecular studies have revealed that one of these integrator genes, FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT), responds to photoperiod and temperature cues, two environmental parameters that greatly influence flowering time. As the central player in the transition to flowering, the protein coding sequence of FT and its function are highly conserved across species. Using QTL mapping with a new advanced intercross-recombinant inbred line (AI-RIL) population, we show that a QTL tightly linked to FT contributes to natural variation in the flowering response to the combined effects of photoperiod and ambient temperature. Using heterogeneous inbred families (HIF) and introgression lines, we fine map the QTL to a 6.7 kb fragment in the FT promoter. We confirm by quantitative complementation that FT has differential activity in the two parental strains. Further support for FT underlying the QTL comes from a new approach, quantitative knockdown with artificial microRNAs (amiRNAs). Consistent with the causal sequence polymorphism being in the promoter, we find that the QTL affects FT expression. Taken together, these results indicate that allelic variation at pathway integrator genes such as FT can underlie phenotypic variability and that this may be achieved through cis-regulatory changes.
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Sympathetic neural responses to mental stress during acute simulated microgravity.
J. Appl. Physiol.
PUBLISHED: 06-18-2009
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Neural and cardiovascular responses to mental stress and acute 6 degrees head-down tilt (HDT) were examined separately and combined. We hypothesized sympathoexcitation during mental stress, sympathoinhibition during HDT, and an additive neural interaction during combined mental stress and HDT. Muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA), mean arterial pressure (MAP), and heart rate (HR) were recorded in 16 healthy subjects (8 men, 8 women) in the supine position during three randomized trials: 1) mental stress (via mental arithmetic), 2) HDT, and 3) combined mental stress and HDT. Mental stress significantly increased MSNA (7+/-1 to 12+/-2 bursts/min; P<0.01), MAP (91+/-2 to 103+/-2 mmHg; P<0.01), and HR (70+/-3 to 82+/-3 beats/min; P<0.01). HDT did not change MSNA or HR, but MAP was reduced (91+/-2 to 89+/-3 mmHg; P<0.05). Combined mental stress and HDT significantly increased MSNA (7+/-1 to 10+/-1 bursts/min; P<0.01), MAP (88+/-3 to 99+/-3 mmHg; P<0.01), and HR (70+/-3 to 82+/-3 beats/min; P<0.01). Increases in MSNA and HR during the combination trial were not different from the sum of the individual trials. However, the increase in MAP during the combination trial was significantly greater than the sum of the individual trials (change of 11+/-1 vs. 9+/-1 mmHg; P<0.05). We conclude that the interaction for MSNA and HR are additive during combined mental stress and HDT but that MAP responses are slightly augmented during the combined trial. These findings demonstrate that sympathetic neural responses to mental stress are unaltered by simulated microgravity.
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QTL mapping in new Arabidopsis thaliana advanced intercross-recombinant inbred lines.
PLoS ONE
PUBLISHED: 02-02-2009
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Even when phenotypic differences are large between natural or domesticated strains, the underlying genetic basis is often complex, and causal genomic regions need to be identified by quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping. Unfortunately, QTL positions typically have large confidence intervals, which can, for example, lead to one QTL being masked by another, when two closely linked loci are detected as a single QTL. One strategy to increase the power of precisely localizing small effect QTL, is the use of an intercross approach before inbreeding to produce Advanced Intercross RILs (AI-RILs).
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The arterial baroreflex resets with orthostasis.
Front Physiol
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The arterial baroreflexes, located in the carotid sinus and along the arch of the aorta, are essential for the rapid short term autonomic regulation of blood pressure. In the past, they were believed to be inactivated during exercise because blood pressure, heart rate, and sympathetic activity were radically changed from their resting functional relationships with blood pressure. However, it was discovered that all relationships between carotid sinus pressure and either HR or sympathetic vasoconstriction maintained their curvilinear sigmoidal shape but were reset or shifted so as to best defend BP during exercise. To determine whether resetting also occurs during orthostasis, we examined the arterial baroreflexes measured supine and upright tilt. We studied the relationships between systolic BP and HR (the cardiovagal baroreflex), mean BP, and ventilation (the ventilatory baroreflex) and diastolic BP and sympathetic nerve activity (the sympathetic baroreflex). We accomplished these measurements by using the modified Oxford method in which BP was rapidly varied with bolus injections of sodium nitroprusside followed 1?min later by bolus injections of phenylephrine. Both the cardiovagal and ventilatory baroreflexes were "reset" with no change in gain or response range. In contrast, the sympathetic baroreflex was augmented as well as shifted causing an increase in peripheral resistance that improved the subjects defense against hypotension. This contrasts with findings during exercise in which peripheral resistance in active skeletal muscle is not increased. This difference is likely selective for exercising muscle and may represent the actions of functional sympatholysis by which exercise metabolites interfere with adrenergic vasoconstriction.
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Fish oil and neurovascular control in humans.
Am. J. Physiol. Heart Circ. Physiol.
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The antihypertensive influence of fish oil is controversial, and the mechanisms remain unclear. Because the inverse relation between fish oil and hypertension appears to be partially dependent on the degree of hypertension, we tested the hypothesis that fish oil would elicit more dramatic reductions in mean arterial pressure (MAP) and muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) in prehypertensive (PHT) compared with normotensive (NT) subjects. Resting MAP, MSNA, and heart rate (HR) were examined before and after 8 wk of fish oil (9 g/day; 1.6 g eicosapentaenoic acid and 1.1 g docosahexaenoic acid) or placebo (olive oil; 9 g/day) in 38 NT (19 fish oil; 19 placebo) and 29 PHT (15 fish oil; 14 placebo) volunteers. Fish oil did not alter resting MAP, MSNA, or HR in either NT (80 ± 1 to 80 ± 1 mmHg; 11 ± 2 to 10 ± 1 bursts/min; 71 ± 2 to 71 ± 2 beats/min) or PHT (88 ± 2 to 87 ± 1 mmHg; 11 ± 2 to 10 ± 2 bursts/min; 73 ± 2 to 73 ± 2 beats/min) subjects. When NT and PHT groups were consolidated, analysis of covariance confirmed that pretreatment resting MAP was not associated with changes in MSNA after fish oil. In contrast, pretreatment resting HR was correlated with changes in MSNA (r = 0.47; P = 0.007) and MAP (r = 0.42; P < 0.007) after fish oil but not placebo. In conclusion, fish oil did not alter sympathetic neural control in NT or PHT subjects. However, our findings suggest that fish oil is associated with modest sympathoinhibition in individuals with higher resting heart rates, a finding that is consistent with a recent meta-analysis examining the relations among fish oil, HR, and the risk of cardiovascular disease.
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What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.