JoVE Visualize What is visualize?
Stop Reading. Start Watching.
Advanced Search
Stop Reading. Start Watching.
Regular Search
Find video protocols related to scientific articles indexed in Pubmed.
Controlling the stereochemistry and regularity of butanethiol self-assembled monolayers on Au(111).
J. Am. Chem. Soc.
PUBLISHED: 11-20-2014
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
The rich stereochemistry of the self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of the four butanethiols on Au(111) is described, SAMs containing up to 12 individual C, S, or Au chiral centers per surface unit cell. This is facilitated by synthesis of enantiomerically pure 2-butanethiol (the smallest unsubstituted chiral alkanethiol), followed by in situ scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) imaging combined with density-functional theory (DFT) molecular dynamics STM-image simulations. Even though butanethiol SAMs manifest strong head-group interactions, steric interactions are shown to dominate SAM structure and chirality. Indeed, steric interactions are shown to dictate the nature of the head-group itself: whether it takes on the adatom-bound motif RS•Au(0)S•R or else involves direct binding of RS• to face-centered cubic (FCC) or hexagonal close-packed (HCP) sites. Binding as RS• produces large organizationally chiral domains even when R is achiral, while adatom binding leads to rectangular plane groups that suppress long-range expression of chirality. Binding as RS• also inhibits the pitting intrinsically associated with adatom binding, desirably producing more regularly structured SAMs.
Related JoVE Video
Activity of ZnO polar surfaces: an insight from surface energies.
Phys Chem Chem Phys
PUBLISHED: 09-12-2014
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
The calculation of the accurate surface energies for (0001) surfaces of wurtzite ZnO is difficult because it is impossible to decouple the two inequivalent (0001)-Zn and (0001¯)-O surfaces. By using a heterojunction model we have transformed the uncertainty of the surface energies into that of interface energies which is much smaller than the former and hence estimated the surface energies to a high degree of accuracy. It is found that the oxygen terminated (0001¯)-O face of the wurtzite phase and (1¯1¯1¯O of the zinc blende phase are more stable than their Zn-terminated counterparts within the major temperature and oxygen partial pressure range accessible to experiment. The instability of Zn-terminated polar surfaces explains the experimentally observed high activity of these surfaces. The effects of native surface vacancies on the surface energies have also been discussed. These results provide insights into the modification of the surface stability and activity of ZnO nanoparticles.
Related JoVE Video
Anomalously slow crystal growth of the glass-forming alloy CuZr.
Nat Mater
PUBLISHED: 03-13-2013
Show Abstract
Hide Abstract
Our ability to exploit the benefits of metallic glasses depends on identifying alloys of high glass-forming ability (GFA). So far, the established empirical correlations of GFA (ref. ) are statistical guides at best and lack a microscopic rationale. Although simulations have the potential to provide this physical insight into the maximum crystallization rate, crystal nucleation is often too slow to be observed. In contrast, measuring the growth rate of a planar crystal surface represents an accessible route to understanding ordering kinetics. Here we use molecular dynamics simulations to show that the crystal growth rate for an important binary glass former, CuZr, is significantly slower than that of a poor glass former, NiAl. In accounting for this difference, we find that the crystal/liquid interface in NiAl exhibits a significantly greater width than that of CuZr. Our results suggest that the crystal/liquid interfacial structure exerts an important influence on the GFA of alloys.
Related JoVE Video

What is Visualize?

JoVE Visualize is a tool created to match the last 5 years of PubMed publications to methods in JoVE's video library.

How does it work?

We use abstracts found on PubMed and match them to JoVE videos to create a list of 10 to 30 related methods videos.

Video X seems to be unrelated to Abstract Y...

In developing our video relationships, we compare around 5 million PubMed articles to our library of over 4,500 methods videos. In some cases the language used in the PubMed abstracts makes matching that content to a JoVE video difficult. In other cases, there happens not to be any content in our video library that is relevant to the topic of a given abstract. In these cases, our algorithms are trying their best to display videos with relevant content, which can sometimes result in matched videos with only a slight relation.